Client Wants Me To Stay And Cut/serve The Cake???

Business By heather1124 Updated 20 Oct 2010 , 4:08pm by cakesdivine

heather1124 Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 4:49pm
post #1 of 21

I have a possible client for a 50th wedding anniversary cake, and she has asked me if I can be there to cut/serve the cake. I'm sure she means plate the cake as I'm certainly not going to be walking around delivering 100 pieces of cake to her guests. I'm not sure how this would work since I'm sure they will not want the cake cut as soon as it is delivered. Would I have to sit around until it's time to cut the cake? Should I just say no? Does anyone else do this? Should I charge and extra fee (I'm thinking a big YES on this one) and how much?

Thanks so much for your help!!!

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20 replies
Auryn Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 4:52pm
post #2 of 21

I would tell her you charge $x.xx by the hour- that includes the time you are sitting around waiting for them to decide to cut the cake- me personally that price would be at least $40/ hr because its not only your time but the cost of other things you could be doing with that time. I would also remind her that she would have to provide plates, cutlery, a appropriate cutting knife etc.

Do you have anything else to be doing that day??
If you do I would tell her sorry no can do

Kiddiekakes Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 4:58pm
post #3 of 21

Some people charge per hour so if they wanted you to stick around for 2-3 hours charge them the going rate per hour..Others charge per serving so if you are cutting up a 100 serving cake...charge per serving.Many venues nowadays charge a serving fee to cut and serve the cake so it is similar to that.Whatever you decide make sure it is worth your while as you may be sitting there a while and it is time away from your family etc...

leah_s Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 5:02pm
post #4 of 21

Around here, the caterer cuts the cake. Just sayin'.

dreamcakesmom Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 5:08pm
post #5 of 21

Sounds like maybe they are trying to "cut" costs thinking you would do this for free But I agree with all other posts thatA. inform her you would have to charge her an hourly fee for the service from the delivery time until the time you walk out the door and B. make the hourly fee worth your effort, this is time you could be with family, friends or making money on other business. Amd under no under certain terms would I agree to delivery and then come back for just an hour- ruins your whole night waiting to do that

Chasey Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 5:17pm
post #6 of 21

I was asked (as a guest) to slice and plate a birthday cake at a venue because the caterer was scared to. icon_confused.gif

Maybe you could suggest to your client that she ask a friend beforehand if they are comfortable doing that, IF the caterer doesn't offer that service?

I can't imagine myself wanting to sit around at a party of strangers, no matter what fee I charge per hour. Awkward!

cakesbycathy Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 5:34pm
post #7 of 21

You charge an hourly fee from the time you walk in with the cake until the time you leave. CASH upfront. I'm thinking like $50 per hour since you could be doing so many more things with your time.

heather1124 Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 5:45pm
post #8 of 21

Whoo, I knew I came to the right place to validate my opinion! I am going to try not to be too chicken to charge her a fair rate for my time. I WILL ask her if the caterer can cut the cake (Leah you are right, my first thought was, no one does this...the caterer/venue does!) I am going to try to get out of it...although this is a 50th wedding anniversary so this lady and her friends are all quite....mature icon_smile.gif Thanks so much for all your input!

tootie0809 Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 2:39pm
post #9 of 21

I've had a few client ask me about cutting the cake. I tell them I make the cakes, I don't cut them. I really don't know how to cut a cake very well anyway. Of the hundreds of cakes I've made, I think I've only ever cut 1 or 2 of them (and that was for family....now I don't even offer to cut them for family functions. I sit back and watch everyone else try to figure out how to cut the cake. My family is actually getting quite good at it now!)

Debcent Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 3:09pm
post #10 of 21

Does anyone know if there is a tutorial on how to cut the different styles of cakes? I would like to know. cake cutting is something Im not comfortable with. Not even sure where to start on a tiered cake. I know I will be asked to cut cake at future family functions. Or even be asked for advice on how to cut a cake. I guess I really dont know!!

KathysCC Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 3:17pm
post #11 of 21

Wilton has a cake cutting guide. It is in most of their catalogs. Here is a link to the online version.

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/cake-cutting-guides/wedding-cake-cutting-guide.cfm

indydebi Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 3:17pm
post #12 of 21

50th anniversary ..... these are usually open house type of functions. Is this what they're having? If so, they are wanting someone to stand by the cake for about 4 hours to cut a piece of cake when someone walks up to the table. Even if the caterer does this, there will be a hefty fee. As a caterer, I would have to bring one extra staffer with me JUST to man the cake table on an open house type of setting. Extra payroll for me = higher cost for you.

So yes, they are going to pay you (no less than $25/hour, 4 hour MINIMUM) to sit around and read a book until they need a piece of cake cut. This includes travel time "door to door", as we call it. (If I sent a staffer to an event just to cut a cake, my person would clock in at the shop, get in the van and drive there, and they wouldn't clock out until they got BACK to the shop. I'd have to pay my employee for ALL of that time ..... ergo so do they.)

They may just be nervous about cutting the cake. Print out my Cake Cutting Guide (signature link) and show them how easy it is. Assigning a granddaughter or a niece to this job is a no-brainer. Most "kids" would think it's pretty cool to be "in charge" of the cake. thumbs_up.gif

Otherwise they can write you a hefty check. They are not paying you to "cut the cake". They are paying you for your TIME and expertise!

BTW, I believe it's very important that bakers know how to cut a cake and I am always enciuraging bakers to cut at least 2-3 of their own wedding cakes a year. 1) It shows the baker how their assembly method affects the client on the cutting end 2) It adds credibiity when the baker assures them how many it will serve ("Because I cut cakes all the time and it always works out great!" as opposed to "well, I've HEARD this is enough!") and 3) I'm just not sure i'd be comfortable buying my cake from someone who tells me "I've no idea how to cut them .... I just slap 'em together and after that you're on your own,"

Add to your credibility and professionalism by becoming THE cake expert! thumbs_up.gif

onceuponacake Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 3:49pm
post #13 of 21

we charge $150 to stay and cut the cake. We let them know that's for four hours of wait time.

we go set up the cake, grab a bite to eat, come back and check on the cake then hang out discreetly til cut time.

dreamcakesmom Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 4:47pm
post #14 of 21

Indydeb- I think that is a great piece of advice about knowing how to cut a cake. I have made it a point ot be the person who cuts the cake when I attend a function I do the cake for. It helped me feel confident in standing behind the # of servings the cake actually produced, gave me insight about disassembling and now when I send a 2-3 tier off with someone I can give them "insider tips" on how to make it as easy as possible for the person who will be responsible. The reality for me is that alot of my 2 tier cakes are in home functions which someone who is not familiar with cakes will be responsible, giving written instructions and any extra feedback will only help ensure your product is presented in it's best light.

indydebi Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 4:51pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamcakesmom

Indydeb- I think that is a great piece of advice about knowing how to cut a cake. I have made it a point ot be the person who cuts the cake when I attend a function I do the cake for. It helped me feel confident in standing behind the # of servings the cake actually produced, gave me insight about disassembling and now when I send a 2-3 tier off with someone I can give them "insider tips" on how to make it as easy as possible for the person who will be responsible. The reality for me is that alot of my 2 tier cakes are in home functions which someone who is not familiar with cakes will be responsible, giving written instructions and any extra feedback will only help ensure your product is presented in it's best light.


YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! EXACTLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

tsal Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 4:57pm
post #16 of 21

Indydebi - great advice. I personally have cake-cutting fear but I'm just a hobbyist. I always feel like I'm cramming for an exam because there I am, on your web page the day before the cake is to be served, reviewing and then I try to make it look as if I completely am at ease! Lol!!!!

It always works out perfectly so I don't know what my issue is - actually, I think it's more that everyone is standing around staring while they wait for cake (I liken this moment to the feelings evoked by public speaking or performing!)

indydebi Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 5:00pm
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsal

(I liken this moment to the feelings evoked by public speaking or performing!)


This is where I differ from most folks because I LUV public speaking! Give me a stage and a microphone and I'm in hog heaven, baby! Audience while I'm putting together or cutting a cake? Total Euphoria!!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

tsal Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 11:36am
post #18 of 21

Indy: I think you should have your own show on TLC. With your confidence and quick wit, it would be a hit for sure!

cakecraft Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 11:57am
post #19 of 21

I agree with you, tsal...let's get indydebi her own show!!!! Who knows how to get the ball rolling? I'm in!!! Debi, LOVE your buttercream and your quick comebacks. Recipe for success for sure.

diane223 Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 12:28pm
post #20 of 21

I actually have a degree in video production! I can tape and produce the Indydebi show!!! We'll just have to shop it to TLC or Food network!

cakesdivine Posted 20 Oct 2010 , 4:08pm
post #21 of 21

I charge $50 an hour to stay an cut/plate cake. I do not take the cake to each person if I am there, they must come to the cake table and get it. icon_wink.gif

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