Which Icings Last Under Fondant??

Decorating By FayMakesCakes Updated 9 Nov 2010 , 5:21am by KimmyKatCakes

FayMakesCakes Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 2:20am
post #1 of 25

Hi, I've been roaming around this site for a while now but I haven't been able to find the answer to this question. Which frostings/icings can you put in a fondant covered cake? I see fondant cakes that say peanut butter, cream cheese, heavy cream and certain icings that I wouldn't think would hold up well when they can't be refrigerated. Is there a way to know which ones can sit out for a day or so without going bad? I've been selling cakes as a hobby but I only put in different versions of buttercream and I'd really like to expand.

I'd appreciate any help (recipes included icon_smile.gif ) Thanks!

24 replies
FayMakesCakes Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 2:20pm
post #2 of 25

icon_cry.gif Please any help...... anyone???? I know this may seem like an amateur question but I'd really appreciate any help. Do people using cream cheese type frostings put their cakes in the fridge and hope the fondant doesn't sweat?? Or does everyone put basic buttercream under fondant and the others are just for other cakes and cupcakes??

Cakegirl313 Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 4:41pm
post #3 of 25

I tend to only use the basic buttercream since I know it sets up very nice but I did experiment with a cream cheese buttercream that crusted and it worked nicely and lasted too. I only know this because the cake was for my husband so it was easy to keep an eye on it. I've also heard of a lot of people using ganache under the buttercream. I've never tried this one. I think that will actually be my next experiment. Good luck!

Sweet_Toof Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 11:46pm
post #4 of 25

I've used sugar syrup (homemade) and buttercream.
I will be using ganache this weekend too.
I think anything at a reasonable fairly thick consistency that doesn't need refrigeration would work ok?
You can try flavouring ganache and buttercreams so there's probably not many more options that you NEED to put under a fondant I would think?

FayMakesCakes Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 2:07am
post #5 of 25

Thanks so much. I thought everyone knew something I didn't.

Thanks!!

Karen421 Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 2:24am
post #6 of 25

I use ganache a lot, more than buttercream now. Not only is just darn good, but I like the way my fondant goes on. icon_biggrin.gif

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=633264&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

Sweet_Toof Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 3:24am
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karen421

I use ganache a lot, more than buttercream now. Not only is just darn good, but I like the way my fondant goes on. icon_biggrin.gif

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=633264&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0




The taste of ganache really does put any other icing to shame doesn't it!

Karen421 Posted 18 Oct 2010 , 11:12am
post #8 of 25

Oh My Gosh!!! Since I started using it, my family and friends ONLY want ganache. They do have their favorites though, I like the semi-sweet, my DD loves the milk and my BBF only wants the bittersweet. I guess we have become coinsures of ganache LOL icon_lol.gif

Sweet_Toof Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 3:47am
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karen421

I use ganache a lot, more than buttercream now. Not only is just darn good, but I like the way my fondant goes on. icon_biggrin.gif

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=633264&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0




Karen
I was going to try cover a cake with fondant, with the ganache underneath for my sister's baby shower this weekend - which is fine because obviously its family and i'll get the practice
Only I just got an order today - MY FIRST WEDDING CAKE! --- I've only ever covered fruitcakes and they work differently because almond-ing fondant and then white fondant so you get the most beautiful coverage with 2 layers of thick icing
I'm really nervous because this is my 1st wedding cake which needs ganache underneath. How co-incidental that I was here talking about it this week and now I have to put it to the test for a paying customer.....
SO ....
How much ganache should I put on? Do I pour when really hot, spread when a little cool? I'm so worried about getting the perfect covering... really nervous! Sometimes I wonder if I should be committing myself to these things because it should be easy peasy and there's something wrong if you're going to be stressing about it?!

kkbritt8 Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 4:05am
post #10 of 25

Sweet_Toof - In my opinion the best way to use ganache under fondant is to let it sit overnight. It will thicken the ganache and it is so easy to spread on (if it gets too thick you can microwave it for a couple seconds to loosen it up). I will actually throw it in my mixer and whip it for a nice mousse-like texture. After you cover the cake and get it nice and smooth, just pop your cake in the fridge and it will set up very nicely for easy fondant covering!

P.S. If you like regular chocolate ganache, try white ganache! YUM!

BecL Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 5:15am
post #11 of 25

FayMakesCakes, I agree with everyone that has suggested ganache (I find a ration of 1 part cream to 3 parts chocolate gives you a ganache that sets really firmly - for me in ACT, Australia anyway). Not only does it give you a smooth surface to put your fondant on, but it hardens enough to withhold the weight of the decorations without sinking. Also, given the smooth surface, you don't have to use a thick layer of fondant to try an cover any bumpy bits, meaning that you save on the amount and therefore the price of fondant.

Karen421 Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 12:27pm
post #12 of 25

You don't want to pour it on, you want to make it and let it set up to a peanut butter consistency. I personally like to whip mine, but it isn't necessary. For (semi, milk, bittersweet) real chocolate the ratio should be a 2 to 1 (2 parts chocolate to 1 part heavy cream) for white chocolate it would be a 3 to 1 ratio. After you do it a few times, you will get the hang of it and "know" what consistency works for you. Here is another website that might help:


http://www.artandappetite.com/2009/11/ganache-instead-of-buttercream/

I don't add butter, but quite often I do add a little raspberry liqueur.

smbegg Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 12:43pm
post #13 of 25

I do not use anything that would require refrigeration, as I do not refrigerate cakes covered in fondant. I recently discovered the Planet Cakes method of covering with ganache-check out their website and book. If I use buttercream, I freeze the bc covered cake for about an hour before covering to give it a firm base to apply.


Hope that helps!

Stephanie

Karen421 Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 12:54pm
post #14 of 25

If you check out the first thread I posted, it was based on the Planet Cake method. A lot of people don't refrigerate - I put everything in the fridge. icon_lol.gif

aswartzw Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 1:16pm
post #15 of 25

Fondant can be refrigerated. I do it all the time especially since I use IMBC.

In all reality, there is no buttercream that can't be used under fondant. If you want super crisp lines though it's easier to achieve with ganache (not pouring kind) or SMBC/IMBC.

smbegg Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 1:20pm
post #16 of 25

I know if can be refrigerated, I just choose not to. I don't like having to deal with the condensation. Maybe this is more of an issue in TX because of the heat and air conditioning.



Stephanie

FayMakesCakes Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 4:19pm
post #17 of 25

Thanks guys.

EvMarie Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 9:42pm
post #18 of 25

Thanks to the OP for this question & of course to Karen421 for the link to that "novel" of a post on ganache.

I don't make many cakes but would love to try ganache for my next one. All the info is super helpful & I guess the only way to get it right is to try it!

icon_smile.gif

FayMakesCakes Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 12:51pm
post #19 of 25

Someone just asked me to make a cake for a family that has milk and soy allergies. Can I make the ganache non dairy? using a creamer and non dairy chocolate? Has anyone done that and is the ratio of chocolate to creamer still the same?

Sweet_Toof Posted 6 Nov 2010 , 12:37pm
post #20 of 25

Just wondering how long you would whip ganache for? I guess this would be a nice idea for cupcakes- would you mix anything else through it to lighten it up?

Karen421 Posted 7 Nov 2010 , 1:15pm
post #21 of 25

Whip just long enough for it to get "fluffy", and it will lighten up considerably. Just don't mix it to long because it will break! (found that out the hard way!) icon_smile.gif
I tried to attach a picture - but it wouldn't let me - so here is a picture of my whipped ganache. (this was milk chocolate)

http://i1185.photobucket.com/albums/z341/Karen421/whippedGanachesm.jpg

Sweet_Toof Posted 8 Nov 2010 , 1:46am
post #22 of 25

Nice! Looks damn tasty!

KimmyKatCakes Posted 8 Nov 2010 , 2:28am
post #23 of 25

Does anyone have a good recipe for the ganache? I am new and I have not heard of this, but the way you talk about it, I guess I must try this! icon_biggrin.gif

Sweet_Toof Posted 8 Nov 2010 , 2:33am
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimmyKatCakes

Does anyone have a good recipe for the ganache? I am new and I have not heard of this, but the way you talk about it, I guess I must try this! icon_biggrin.gif




Kimmy, boil 250ml cream. Turn heat off. Add 500g dark chocolate and stir through til lumps are all gone icon_smile.gif

KimmyKatCakes Posted 9 Nov 2010 , 5:21am
post #25 of 25

THANKS! Sound yummy! icon_biggrin.gif

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