Even Baking For 6" X 4' Pan

Baking By by_mommamee Updated 16 Oct 2010 , 12:24am by madgeowens

by_mommamee Posted 14 Oct 2010 , 4:54am
post #1 of 14

Help...i've used a flower nail when baking on my 6 inch pan that's 4" high but it still doesn't bake right...it domes high and almost burns on the top...the inside isn't even done yet...i've tried wrapping in a wet towel too but i still can't get it right...any tips?...and at what temp and how long do you guys usually bake from a 6"x4"?...TIA

13 replies
madgeowens Posted 14 Oct 2010 , 5:29am
post #2 of 14

I would make shoter cake myself...its hard to get a cake to bake evenly when you have too much batter in there...and thats a wee cake to use a core....

by_mommamee Posted 14 Oct 2010 , 5:23pm
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

I would make shoter cake myself...its hard to get a cake to bake evenly when you have too much batter in there...and thats a wee cake to use a core....




i would too...it's just that i haven't found the pans to make 5" and 6" cakes that are short =(....

Suzisweet Posted 14 Oct 2010 , 5:33pm
post #4 of 14

You must turn down your oven for all 4" high cake pans....I removed about 25 degrees from my recipes...ie 350 reduced to 325 etc. One of my recipes bakes at 285ish. I ALWAYS use an icing nail, some times two depending on cake round/square size (even in the very small ones). I do love the 4" pan and still experiment with different recipes and after trial and error I have had success.

Give it a try. Best of luck.
Suzi

madgeowens Posted 14 Oct 2010 , 11:47pm
post #5 of 14

just put less batter in the cake pan.....

Suzisweet Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 1:09am
post #6 of 14

The pans are made to make a 4" cake. If you use less batter you might as well use a 3" or a 2". I guess it depends what you want that type of pan for. I am actually using them to get a 4" cake though.
They have become my favorite pans (Fat Daddio) I have the 4" height rounds in just about every size.

madgeowens Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 3:16am
post #7 of 14

well thats all I can come up with for you...sorry

by_mommamee Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 4:39am
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzisweet

You must turn down your oven for all 4" high cake pans....I removed about 25 degrees from my recipes...ie 350 reduced to 325 etc. One of my recipes bakes at 285ish. I ALWAYS use an icing nail, some times two depending on cake round/square size (even in the very small ones). I do love the 4" pan and still experiment with different recipes and after trial and error I have had success.

Give it a try. Best of luck.
Suzi




is icing nail the same as the flower nail?...for a 4inch pan that's 4 inch high how long would you bake it at 325?...how long for a 5 inch one?

by_mommamee Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 4:42am
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

just put less batter in the cake pan.....




i was thinking of putting a little batter on about 3 pans and just stack them...=)

Suzisweet Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 11:55am
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by by_mommamee

Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

just put less batter in the cake pan.....



i was thinking of putting a little batter on about 3 pans and just stack them...=)




Yes, it is a flower nail....sorry I did not explain better.

Be very careful when not filling them the proper height for a 4" cake as they become very difficult to remove from the pan sometimes. Because the pan is so deep the cakes want to start coming out diagonally (as in one side comes out more then the other and it gets wedged) and it may crack. I have had this happen a couple of times when I am too lazy to get out and prepare my 2" or 3" when there is left over batter. (You can always make cake truffles with broken cake though!!! icon_biggrin.gif )

For the baking times, I think I have some notes for these pans but they are at my work kitchen. I will take a look today and get back to you.

For now though, when I was learning I always timed for the max time on the recipe then adding time as needed which there always is. Some recipes (pound cakes in particular) take a very long time. Do not be temped to keep opening the oven. I used to do this when I was learning to use these pans and probably created a lot of the flops that had occurred. Just drop the temp the initial 25 degrees, time for max, look at cake (through oven window if possible) do not open until it looks like it is done. Once you think it looks done, crack oven, reach in and touch top, if not springing back adjust time and bake more. I do not test with cake tester until I get that little bit of spring on the top. Once I do I then insert tester and if it comes out clean I am good if not put back in and adjust time.
Suzi

madgeowens Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 3:16pm
post #11 of 14

Oh Im sorry I must have read wrong...I thought you didnt have good results with the nail. Of course that is a choice, and a good one. Personally, all my 4 inch hi pans I use less batter so I don't have to cut them down I use a lower temp to bake. Happy caking!!

by_mommamee Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 4:06pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzisweet

Quote:
Originally Posted by by_mommamee

Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

just put less batter in the cake pan.....



i was thinking of putting a little batter on about 3 pans and just stack them...=)



Yes, it is a flower nail....sorry I did not explain better.

Be very careful when not filling them the proper height for a 4" cake as they become very difficult to remove from the pan sometimes. Because the pan is so deep the cakes want to start coming out diagonally (as in one side comes out more then the other and it gets wedged) and it may crack. I have had this happen a couple of times when I am too lazy to get out and prepare my 2" or 3" when there is left over batter. (You can always make cake truffles with broken cake though!!! icon_biggrin.gif )

For the baking times, I think I have some notes for these pans but they are at my work kitchen. I will take a look today and get back to you.

For now though, when I was learning I always timed for the max time on the recipe then adding time as needed which there always is. Some recipes (pound cakes in particular) take a very long time. Do not be temped to keep opening the oven. I used to do this when I was learning to use these pans and probably created a lot of the flops that had occurred. Just drop the temp the initial 25 degrees, time for max, look at cake (through oven window if possible) do not open until it looks like it is done. Once you think it looks done, crack oven, reach in and touch top, if not springing back adjust time and bake more. I do not test with cake tester until I get that little bit of spring on the top. Once I do I then insert tester and if it comes out clean I am good if not put back in and adjust time.
Suzi




ooohh!...please do get back on the baking times...please...my tops always burn...i think even before midway of the time so i top it off with foil...i really need help!!!

by_mommamee Posted 15 Oct 2010 , 4:08pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

Oh Im sorry I must have read wrong...I thought you didnt have good results with the nail. Of course that is a choice, and a good one. Personally, all my 4 inch hi pans I use less batter so I don't have to cut them down I use a lower temp to bake. Happy caking!!




how much batter do you put in and how low the temp?...i still haven't found the small pans so i need all the advice i can get! =)....

madgeowens Posted 16 Oct 2010 , 12:24am
post #14 of 14

I never measure....I would guess about one third full....and I always turn baking temp backatleast ten degrees....I visited IloIlo Bocalid and Manila....loved it

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