Making Large Cakes (14" & 16")

Decorating By AnnGeeV Updated 13 Oct 2010 , 11:53pm by CWR41

AnnGeeV Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 8:29pm
post #1 of 15

I tried to made one of the larger cakes sizes (16"). The problem is my cake turned out to be bumpy and it cracked in the middle. It also broke-up when I took it out of the pan. Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can make better larger cakes? I'm doing a wedding cake in a couple of months and any help, suggestions or ideas would be appreciated.

14 replies
squeaky121603 Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 9:03pm
post #2 of 15

This is how I handle large cakes. Once done and rested for 15 minutes I then take my cooling rack and place it on top of the cake and then flip it over for cake to come out. Then, once cake is cooled completely, I take the cake (still on cooling rack) and use the backside of pan and flip it onto the pan to wrap for freezer for few days. You could put the saran wrap onto the pan before flipping. Once you have a layer of saran wrap on it is easier to handle. These large cakes are much easier to handle if you freeze them first, then you can pick them up and place then on your board for frosting.

HTH,
Carol

DianeLM Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 9:21pm
post #3 of 15

I don't know what you mean by 'bumpy'.

If you line the bottom of your pan with parchment, it will be easier to handle the cake once it's out of the pan.

Just remember that whenever you turn over a cake of this size, you need to sandwich it between a board, rack or any combination of those - not just your hand. So, even when you go to remove the parchment, turn the cake over onto a board or rack first.

When you remove the cake from the oven, let it cool at least 15 minutes.

Place a cooling rack or board on top of the cake and turn it out of the pan. Then, immediately after removing the pan, place a cooling rack on the cake and flip it back over so it's cooling on the flat bottom. Leave the parchment attached to the cake until you're ready to decorate.

If you must move parts of the cake in such a way that you can't sandwich them between boards (like when you're torting and filling), chill the part you're going to have to handle in the freezer for at least 30 minutes. Longer, if you can. Much less likely to break.

If your cake doesn't fit in the freezer, cover a board with Glad Press N Seal and use it slide under the layers that need to be moved.

Hope this helps!

TrixieTreats Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 9:23pm
post #4 of 15

I think the tips carol gave are great, and are really all you can do. I always use my largest cutting boards to move large cakes around, flip them over, when torting and especially when assembling layers. It is much larger than my cooling rack, and I find it easier for me to work with.

AnnGeeV Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 9:48pm
post #5 of 15

Thank you so much for your advice. I will try.....

Happy Caking!!!

All4Show Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 10:00pm
post #6 of 15

When I am moving a large torted layer, I use a cookie sheet with only one side. I also freeze the cake for a while before I torte or move it like some have already said.

yummy_in_my_tummy Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 10:09pm
post #7 of 15

Are you using a heating core when you bake large cakes? I'm not sure what kind of crack you got - was it in the middle of your cake when you pulled it out of the oven? Maybe you baked it too long, to get the center cooked all the way thru, which maybe caused it to be extra dry and fall apart?

I always use a heating core when baking a cake 14" and larger, just to make sure it bakes all the way thru, without staying in too long and drying out.

Just a thought! thumbs_up.gif

sillywabbitz Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 10:33pm
post #8 of 15

A couple of minor things. Your cake rack needs to be plenty large to hold the entire cake. Also if there is a large dome, it helps to trim that off before you flip it out onto a cooling rack. I take a long knife and lay it flush with the pan and trim the cake to pan height. If you turn out a domed cake onto a cooling rack it will almost always crack.

eve81 Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 10:42pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

A couple of minor things. Your cake rack needs to be plenty large to hold the entire cake. Also if there is a large dome, it helps to trim that off before you flip it out onto a cooling rack. I take a long knife and lay it flush with the pan and trim the cake to pan height. If you turn out a domed cake onto a cooling rack it will almost always crack.



OMG such a simple thing yet I've NEVER thought to do it....Thank you! icon_smile.gif

Kandis Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 11:07pm
post #10 of 15

My freezer isn't large enough for that size cake but I sure wish it was!!! I wish someone would make a video showing how they put the top layer of a large cake on!! I need visuals!! LOL Seriously thank you to all you experienced cakers for all your suggestions!!!

yummy_in_my_tummy Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 11:19pm
post #11 of 15

Kandis , I don't know how many other people do this, but when I'm torting a LARGE sheet cake, I do it in halves. I could totally be doing it the wrong way, but I found it's easier to cut the cake in half so you have a top and a bottom, then cut it down the middle, so you basically have four pieces. Then you can take the top two pieces off, fill it and then put them back on. For all I know, it could be frowned upon, but it's easy that way icon_smile.gif

pattycakesnj Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 11:45pm
post #12 of 15

I use 2 Wilton cake lifters and slide them under cake, one from each side. They work great and can handle large layers including full sheet cakes.

greengyrl26 Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 11:46pm
post #13 of 15

My problem with cakes this large...is covering them in fondant. Is there some secret that I'm missing? I mean, how do you possibly roll out a piece of fondant big enough to cover a 14" (or larger) cake, without a sheeter? The mats that I use to roll fondant out on, aren't even that big....
Any advice here would be SOO VERY appreciated! icon_smile.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 11:50pm
post #14 of 15

Nobody has mentioned low and slow yet. By that, I mean lower the baking temperature by at least 25 degrees F, then increase the baking time by at least 15-30 minutes.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

CWR41 Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 11:53pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by greengyrl26

I mean, how do you possibly roll out a piece of fondant big enough to cover a 14" (or larger) cake, without a sheeter?




You could roll it out onto a 22" cake circle, and slide it off onto your 14" cake.

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