Cake Drying Out In The Fridge

Decorating By princesscatt Updated 4 Jan 2014 , 11:11pm by cledaryl

princesscatt Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 12:49am
post #1 of 14

I use Toba Garret's scratch recipe for both my vanilla and chocolate cake. When they are first baked they are very soft and tender. After sitting in the fridge for a day or two they seem to get very thick and loose their softness? I just made a cake for a wedding I attended. The cakes were made on Wed, filled and crumb coated on Thursday/Friday and fully iced and stacked on Sat. The wedding was today, sunday. while it was delicious, if i may say so myself icon_smile.gif The cake wasn't as soft as it was on the first day. I wrap them in plastic wrap. Any suggestions?

13 replies
indydebi Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 3:26am
post #2 of 14

why are you refrigerating cakes to start with? Unless there is a perishable filling, cakes don't need refrigerated. (having milk in the icing does not make it 'perishable'.) I never refrigerate my cakes.


Putting cakes in the 'frig accelerates the "going stale" process ..... see pastrylady's post on this thread (on page 2): http://forum.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=608252&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=cooks&&start=15

blissfulbaker Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 3:45am
post #3 of 14

I always thought that putting a cake in the fridge would dry it out too. However, I recently took a fondant class by Collette Peters and she recommended to keep a cake moist was to keep it in the pan, about 15 minutes after taking it out of the oven to cover it with plastic wrap and put it in the fridge. She told us not to remove it from the pan until we were ready to frost it. After crumb coating and covering it with fondant she said it was not necessary to put it back in the fridge.

Indydebi, what is your opinion on this. I have always valued your thoughts.

sweetheart6710 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 4:12am
post #4 of 14

I agree with IndyDeb. I never refridgerate if I don't have to. Actually, I let my cake cool about 80% (to where it is cool to the touch, but you can still sense some warmth in the middle) and then I wrap it up a few good times with plastic wrap, and leave it right on my counter. The warmth from the middle kind of sweats out, but the plastic wrap seals it in. The next day when I unwrap it, getting it ready to fill and ice, its always SO moist, never dry.

I'm not saying you should do what I do.. but my vote is no fridge.

indydebi Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 5:21am
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

I always thought that putting a cake in the fridge would dry it out too. However, I recently took a fondant class by Collette Peters and she recommended to keep a cake moist was to keep it in the pan, about 15 minutes after taking it out of the oven to cover it with plastic wrap and put it in the fridge. She told us not to remove it from the pan until we were ready to frost it. After crumb coating and covering it with fondant she said it was not necessary to put it back in the fridge.

Indydebi, what is your opinion on this. I have always valued your thoughts.



I absolutely respect C.Peters, the work she does and her contributions to the industry. Since I baked my cakes early in the week and froze them, I'd need a MUCh large pan inventory if I were to store the cakes in the pans for any length of time. I would not dispute her advice. I would only offer that logistically, that method wouldnt' work for me.

jenscreativity Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 6:02am
post #6 of 14

I never refridgerate cakes unless I have a filling that needs it. No need..just wrap in plastic wrap.

Best of luck!

icon_smile.gif

jenscreativity Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 6:02am
post #7 of 14

I never refridgerate cakes unless I have a filling that needs it. No need..just wrap in plastic wrap.

Best of luck!

icon_smile.gif

jenscreativity Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 6:02am
post #8 of 14

I never refridgerate cakes unless I have a filling that needs it. No need..just wrap in plastic wrap.

Best of luck!

icon_smile.gif

sweettreat101 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 6:20am
post #9 of 14

If you are baking your cakes ahead of time and want to keep them moist then wrap them in plastic wrap and freeze them. Take them out of the freezer leaving the plastic wrap on for at least two hours before you decorate. This will keep them nice and moist. I only refrigerate my cakes for a couple of hours before delivery to help things firm up for travel. Cakes taste best at room temp.

princesscatt Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 12:05pm
post #10 of 14

It was a bavarian cream filling with cool whip cream cheese and milk...I had to refrigerate it...maybe I made the cake too early? I mean filled and iced it? No one complained to me, people came up and told me how delicious it was but I am my worst critic and I think it can always be better!

Here is a another question...do you use room temp ingredients to make your cake? If so do you think it makes a difference?

blissfulbaker Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 12:29pm
post #11 of 14

@Indydebi, I had the same thoughts about the number of pans that must be needed. Since I bake at home for friends and family I usually have enough cake pans. However, I decorate for a local bakery and she does not have the luxury of keeping all her cakes in the pans. At the bakery, the cakes wrapped in plastic and kept frozen until they are decorated.

It has been my thoughts that when a cake comes out of the oven there is a certain amount of evaporation. By keeping the cake in the pan and putting plastic over it shortly after it comes out of the oven and then refridgerating it, the condensation and moisture are kept in the cake. Since I have taken the classes by Collette, I am now using her method. My cakes are very moist.

ChrissyLynn Posted 28 Jan 2011 , 6:17pm
post #12 of 14

Ok, I wrapped a cake (It was an extra layer from a wedding cake I made 2 weeks ago), put it in the refrigerator and forgot about it. Is it still okay to eat?

blissfulbaker Posted 28 Jan 2011 , 7:25pm
post #13 of 14

It is probably safe to eat but it maybe a little dry. I would make cakeballs out of it.

cledaryl Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 11:11pm
post #14 of 14

AWouldn't simple syrup help with moisture. Just asking

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