Doing My First Tiered Cake

Decorating By disney16 Updated 11 Oct 2010 , 3:05pm by Apti

disney16 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 12:19am
post #1 of 13

I'm doing my first tiered fondant cake and I need a little help. The cake will be a 6 " round over a 9" round. I'm going to use the cake plate in between the tiers and bubble straws in the bottom tiers with the long wooden dowel going thru both tiers.


1. Do I put a little buttercream in between the top tier and the bottom tier? Basically under the cake board but above the next cake that will also be covered in fondant.

2. When I put the straws into the bottom tier covered with fondant should the straws show or do they need to be cut a little lower? I just want to make sure that I have the correct amount of support.

3. Will MMF be strong enough to hold both tiers plus decorations?

Thanks in advance

12 replies
KristyCakes Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 12:50am
post #2 of 13

I use buttercream or royal icing before adding the top cake. Straws/dowels should be cut flush with the fondant on the bottom cake - you don't want any pressure on that bottom cake.

Not sure about the MMF - I use Satin Ice - but it should be fine.

Good luck.

disney16 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 1:30am
post #3 of 13

so the dowels should be the exact same height as the bottom tier? I'm not sure what you mean by "flush".

CWR41 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 1:42am
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by disney16

I'm going to use the cake plate in between the tiers and bubble straws in the bottom tiers with the long wooden dowel going thru both tiers.


How are you going to get the one long wooden dowel thru both tiers since you're using a cake plate in between?

Quote:
Originally Posted by disney16

1. Do I put a little buttercream in between the top tier and the bottom tier?


Yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by disney16

2. When I put the straws into the bottom tier covered with fondant should the straws show or do they need to be cut a little lower?


The advice of "flush", means level with or the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by disney16

3. Will MMF be strong enough to hold both tiers plus decorations?


MMF will hold decorations, but it doesn't have anything to do with holding both tiers--that's what your support system does.

Apti Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 1:47am
post #5 of 13

google: how to stacked cakes

there are a ton a fabulous videos on line. Here's a link to one of my favorites:
http://www.youtube.com/sweetwiseinc#p/u/3/KdzLN5hjulo

disney16 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 1:57am
post #6 of 13

so the dowels should be the exact same height as the bottom tier? I'm not sure what you mean by "flush".

disney16 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 2:00am
post #7 of 13

I will be using the paper cake board so when sharpen the wooden doll rod, I'm assuimg it will go thru it.

Thanks everyone

iluvpeeks Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 4:50am
post #8 of 13

You said that you are using straws, right? The whole idea of the straws is to support the top tier. You don't want the top tier to put any weight on the bottom tier. Stick the straws into the bottom tier, and mark the straw so you know where to cut the straws. Make sure that the cut straws are level with the top of the bottom cake, so when you put the top tier on, the cake is resting on the straws and not the cake.

Apti Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 6:54am
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by disney16

so the dowels should be the exact same height as the bottom tier? I'm not sure what you mean by "flush".




flush means level with the top of the cake.
If you are only doing a 2 tier and the top tier is 6" you will not need to put a dowel thru both cakes. All you have to do is measure the straws for the bottom tier: 4-6 straws should be sufficient. Make sure they are all the exact same length and don't stick up above the cake when you put them in. Make sure they will be under the 6" round cake on top (I lay a 6" cardboard cake board and then poke a few tiny holes inside the "circle" with a toothpick) Before you start, if you haven't already, watch the video I suggested!

Let us know how it turns out, ok?

disney16 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 12:55pm
post #10 of 13

I won't be starting this until Thursday and I plan on watching the videos also. So why don't I need to the top dowel to go thru both cakes? Will the cake shift when it's being transported?

I'm bring the cake to work on Friday and then my co-worker has to bring it home and then to the party on Saturday. Will it survive without that top dowel going thru both cakes?

Pickulz Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 1:00pm
post #11 of 13

How big (as in width) should dowel rods be?

CWR41 Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 1:44pm
post #12 of 13

Use a center dowel rod.

Apti Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 3:05pm
post #13 of 13

yeah, with all the movement, CWR41 is correct and I'm wrong. Sorry. I haven't needed a center dowel with my two tier cakes when I was transporting them, but if yours is going thru all those transfers, better safe than sorry.

Just buy a package of wooden dowel rods by Wilton, $3.29, 12"x1/4". Sharpen with a pencil sharpener. You may wish to also purchase Wilton cake boards and tape or glue about 4 of them together or make your own with clean cardboard. Make sure when you stack your cake boards that you alternate the cardboard corrugations (bottom with corrugations going east/west, next one with corrugations going north/south, etc.). It will make them very strong. You can cover your board with freezer paper, shiny side up.

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