Pricing (Wait! Read On!) For Extra Tiers...

Decorating By tavyheather Updated 31 Mar 2011 , 2:16am by CWR41

tavyheather Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 9:39pm
post #1 of 61

I did a search first...in all fairness...but seriously bear with me..I'm really confused about this one...

Cake to serve 50-60. Easy, right? nope...they have this idea of a 3-tier round and possibly adding a 4th tier as a gift.

Making a 3 tier cake to feed 60 is as almost easy as making a two-tiered to feed 60, I just shrink the bottom tier...so why would that be the same price?

I realize the servings would be off...but ok, maybe this will make more sense...
A 10-8-6 serves 60. A 12-8 also serves 60. If someone wants a three tiered cake it is a lot more work (esp if I'm doing piping, or in this case, a mosaic) than just 2 tiers...kwim?

I guess I'll add maybe $50+ if they want a 4th tier, but the rest has me baffled...do u charge an "extra tier fee" if an extra is unnecessary to reach the servings needed?

60 replies
karenm0712 Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 9:58pm
post #2 of 61

Good point! For me, my two tier cakes are one price per serving (and the same as a non-tiered party cake), anything 3+ tiers is an additional .25 per serving for basic designs. I will add to the cost of the cake for intricate details.

cakesbycathy Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 10:10pm
post #3 of 61

I charge per serving, regardless of how many tiers the cake is.

leah_s Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 10:31pm
post #4 of 61

Ditto cakesbycathy. I charge by the serving. I couldn't care less how many tiers it is. They will however, pay more in an equipment, because a three tier cake uses more equipment than a two tier cake.

The 8/12 combo has slightly less area to decorate, but not that much difference between the 6/8/10.

The real issue is that a 6/8/10 round serves 75 NOT 60.

loriemoms Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 10:50pm
post #5 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesbycathy

I charge per serving, regardless of how many tiers the cake is.




same here. and for a three tiered cake for 50, which will serve 60, I charge for 60...

tavyheather Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 11:19pm
post #6 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Ditto cakesbycathy. I charge by the serving. I couldn't care less how many tiers it is. They will however, pay more in an equipment, because a three tier cake uses more equipment than a two tier cake.

The 8/12 combo has slightly less area to decorate, but not that much difference between the 6/8/10.

The real issue is that a 6/8/10 round serves 75 NOT 60.




I agree, normally slightly less... but not always...and I guess the shinymetalobjects link is wrong, b/c that's where I got the info (though I trust u and ur experience more than a computer link) though u get my point, right?

tavyheather Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 11:21pm
post #7 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by karenm0712

Good point! For me, my two tier cakes are one price per serving (and the same as a non-tiered party cake), anything 3+ tiers is an additional .25 per serving for basic designs. I will add to the cost of the cake for intricate details.




I like this concept!

indydebi Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 11:52pm
post #8 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesbycathy

I charge per serving, regardless of how many tiers the cake is.



same here. and for a three tiered cake for 50, which will serve 60, I charge for 60...



ditto these two and leah.

And more than once I've told a bride, "You cant' have a 3 tier cake to serve 50."

CWR41 Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 12:25am
post #9 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by tavyheather

...and I guess the shinymetalobjects link is wrong...




Not necessarily, you just need to select the chart you wish to use (in this case, wedding servings 2" deep pans):
http://www.shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi

A 12x8 = 80 wedding cake servings.

I get what you're saying though... sometimes a 4-tier cake costs less than a larger diameter 3-tier cake and you think "why wouldn't anyone rather have the 4-tier for less money?" (even though the 3-tier probably serves more.)

You can look at it this way: Either don't offer the size that you think is "too good to be true" or charge accordingly for how many tiers, OR

don't worry about it because it all averages out; more batter/servings for the 3-tier with less decorating surface or less batter/servings for the 4-tier with a little more decorating surfaces.

tavyheather Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 5:07am
post #10 of 61

hmm...ok so why wedding cake servings? I'm not adding in the top tier anyway and it's not for a wedding...ughh stupid cake calculator..I'm going back to Erline's chart ..or whatever her name is!

indydebi Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 5:37am
post #11 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by tavyheather

hmm...ok so why wedding cake servings? I'm not adding in the top tier anyway and it's not for a wedding...ughh stupid cake calculator..I'm going back to Erline's chart ..or whatever her name is!



it's just a unit of measure to give you a consistent method of determining price .... and oh yeah, you can figure how many people it will feed, too.

People don't have to agree with the unit of measure. It is what it is. A can of campbell's tomato soup says it will serve 2.5 people, but I guarantee you that when I make a can of it, the whole thing gets poured into my big coffee mug and *I* say it serves ONE! icon_wink.gif That doesn't stop campbell's from advertising "lunch for only $......" based on 2.5 servings.

whatever chart you use, just select the one you want and stick with it. I went by the wilton wedding chart to determine pricing. A 10" round serves 38 and I would tell people, "This serves 25-35, depending on how you cut it." But they would PAY for 38 servings, since that's how many servings it was DESIGNED to serve, and I would give them a short how-to lesson in cake cutting.

If you use a chart that offers more generous servings, be sure you explain that to each and every client, especially if you charge more per serving (since they are getting more cake per serving). The genl public .... when buying ANYTHING ...,. can be a little dense and I swear to you someone will someday say, "I"m getting my cake at XYZ bakery. Their 10" round serves 35 but but tavyheather's 10" round only serves 25. I get more cake at the bakery."

I swear to god it will happen. dunce.gif

CWR41 Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 6:16am
post #12 of 61

A serving is based on the industry standard of 8 cu. in.

A 2" tall single-layer cake is cut 2x2x2
A 4" tall double-layer cake is cut 1x2x4

Kiddiekakes Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 12:11pm
post #13 of 61

I agree with Leah_S and Indydebi....I charge by the serving.More often than not the client is looking for a specific look and not neccessarily the servings so if they want a 3 tiered cake from a picture they saw...they get charged for those many servings...I can't tell you how many people I deal with that want a 2 tiered cake and only want to feed 10 people...Go Figure....once they find out the cost they usually choose something else.

jlynnw Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 12:47pm
post #14 of 61

Ok, another stupid questions. I have always read to charge by the serving and not the cake. But if a 10 inch cake serves x for weddings and y for parties - isn't is just easier to say a 10 inch cake charge is $$$, and just make it simpler? I know you need to know the serving size, like indydebi says, just because that is the # of servings does not mean that is how the cake will be cut. Isn't a party tier cake and a wedding cake going to cost the same even if the number of servings is different? Please don't shoot! icon_redface.gif

TexasSugar Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 2:01pm
post #15 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlynnw

I have always read to charge by the serving and not the cake. But if a 10 inch cake serves x for weddings and y for parties - isn't is just easier to say a 10 inch cake charge is $$$, and just make it simpler?




Why should a cake cost differently because of the occasion it is for? Pick one chart and use it. It is perfectly fine to use the wedding chart for other occasion cakes, since the serving size is plenty. And if they want to serve larger pieces then they can order more cake.

leah_s Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 2:31pm
post #16 of 61

Ditto Texas. Don't charge differently for wedding or party cakes. Use the wedding chart to figure pricing (like Indy said.) The event that the cake is being served at is TOTALLY irrelevant. The Wilton wedding chart provides plently of cake for a serving.

And Indy is right on. If your 10" cake only serves 25 and the bakery's serves 35, you will lose lots of business! LOL

tavyheather Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 9:42pm
post #17 of 61

you all are amazing...thank you so much for the info.

Debi I laugh at almost everything u post icon_lol.gif

jlynnw Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 10:04pm
post #18 of 61

I get the size thing. One size is for parties that assume you will only have cake therefore a larger serving is needed. I am asking why not just charge $x for the y size cake. I do not understand why to price per serving. A loaf of bread is $x and serves y. A larger loaf is $x and serves more. A specialty loaf cost more. I am just trying to wrap my head around the idea. Not meaning to argue. I just don't get this and need to real quick! A 10 inch cake is a 10 inch cake, wedding or not, and costs $x. I have a strong feeling I need to buy stock in tylenol. icon_cry.gif

TexasSugar Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 11:17pm
post #19 of 61

You are right, a 10in cake should cost the same thing no matter the occasion.

The problem comes from when people have two serving sizes but don't factor in that that the occasions serves different amounts.

Some people don't have differen't price per servings for the different sizes so they may in fact be charging two different amounts for the cake. Which means unless you have a higher price per serving on your party cakes you are losing money.

8in round serves 24 wedding servings and 20 party servings. If someone doesn't factor that difference in and charge one price per serving no matter what size the slice is then they are losing out on the cost of 4 servings. Not a huge deal on a small cake but on a three tier cake that is a 6/8/10 that is a difference of 14 servings. And at $3 a serving that is $42.

If your 10in cake costs the same amount, no matter if they get 2, 10, or 35 servings, then you don't have to over think it at all. You are right on track.

cakesbycathy Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 11:19pm
post #20 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlynnw

I get the size thing. One size is for parties that assume you will only have cake therefore a larger serving is needed. I am asking why not just charge $x for the y size cake. I do not understand why to price per serving. A loaf of bread is $x and serves y. A larger loaf is $x and serves more. A specialty loaf cost more. I am just trying to wrap my head around the idea. Not meaning to argue. I just don't get this and need to real quick! A 10 inch cake is a 10 inch cake, wedding or not, and costs $x. I have a strong feeling I need to buy stock in tylenol. icon_cry.gif




Indydebi has a much better explanation of this but I'll give it a shot:
You are pricing per serving. Client wants cake for 30 people. You tell them it costs $90. When you break it down that's $3 per serving.

Pick one serving chart and go by that.

KoryAK Posted 7 Oct 2010 , 11:42pm
post #21 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlynnw

I get the size thing. One size is for parties that assume you will only have cake therefore a larger serving is needed. I am asking why not just charge $x for the y size cake. I do not understand why to price per serving. A loaf of bread is $x and serves y. A larger loaf is $x and serves more. A specialty loaf cost more. I am just trying to wrap my head around the idea. Not meaning to argue. I just don't get this and need to real quick! A 10 inch cake is a 10 inch cake, wedding or not, and costs $x. I have a strong feeling I need to buy stock in tylenol. icon_cry.gif




Because if, at the bakery you go to, the bread is available in 20 different widths and 5 different heights it's just easier to charge by the slice at that point icon_smile.gif

misha35 Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 12:11am
post #22 of 61

This pricing discussion comes up a lot & I love this video to explain why one cake, one price. This has been posted her before but i still love it!


costumeczar Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 1:25am
post #23 of 61

I don't even charge per serving anymore, technically. I give the bride a range of servings because I've seen how they cut cakes so small around here, who knows how many servings they'll actually get out of it. Here's my blog entry about it http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2009/11/how-i-price-my-wedding-cakes.html

SugarKissesCakery Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 2:50am
post #24 of 61

I'm still a little confused on the topic. I do charge differently for weddings. Wedding cakes involve a consultation and delivery while my party cakes do not. Instead of charging for those services, they are included in the price of the wedding cake. For those of you who have the same price for party/wedding cakes, do you charge for the consult and delivery?

leah_s Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 3:13am
post #25 of 61

I don't charge for the consultations but I do charge for the delivery.

tavyheather Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 4:11am
post #26 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by misha35

This pricing discussion comes up a lot & I love this video to explain why one cake, one price. This has been posted her before but i still love it!





lol

linstead Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 4:38am
post #27 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by misha35

This pricing discussion comes up a lot & I love this video to explain why one cake, one price. This has been posted her before but i still love it!






icon_lol.gificon_lol.gifthumbs_up.gif
Thanks for the laughs!

jlynnw Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 1:32pm
post #28 of 61

Still don't get this at all! OK, I will try from a different thought. An event needs cake for 63 people - 63 is not on a chart. I make a cake for 75 servings. I charge for 75 serving not the 63 ordered because the cake is not missing a few servings. Therefore, am I not charging for the whole cake?

Video does make a good point!

TexasSugar Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 2:13pm
post #29 of 61

Yes you charge what the cake will serve, not the number of servings they need.

In your example, they are paying for a cake that serves 75. So they pay $3 per serving or $225 for the thing. Either way, but numbers equal the same thing.

If you only charge for teh 63 servings they asked for but gave them a cake for 75 then you are giving them free cake.

jlynnw Posted 8 Oct 2010 , 3:16pm
post #30 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Yes you charge what the cake will serve, not the number of servings they need.

In your example, they are paying for a cake that serves 75. So they pay $3 per serving or $225 for the thing. Either way, but numbers equal the same thing.

If you only charge for teh 63 servings they asked for but gave them a cake for 75 then you are giving them free cake.




So I am charging for the cake and not by the serving?! I guess I will just do a chart that had the number of serving, the price, and just go with that. The rest of this does not make sense to me.

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