The Cake Collapsed All Over The Floor...

Decorating By cathie1327 Updated 19 Oct 2010 , 3:53am by Ironbaker

madgeowens Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 3:11am
post #31 of 56

are these bubble straws sturdy?

UpAt2am Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 3:30am
post #32 of 56

i use bubble tea straws exclusively and they support my cakes beautifully! i've gone up to five tiers with them! never a collapse...knock on wood icon_surprised.gif i buy them from my local asian supply store and i get a bag of 100 for $1.49! i always buy 10 bags at a time b/c i burn through 100 in a month or so. they're wide and hollow and don't displace the cake. they're cheap and can be found in any city. you can cut them to any size and they don't splinter or get soaked with grease! win, win, win!

Sweet_Toof Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 5:26am
post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by UpAt2am

i use bubble tea straws exclusively and they support my cakes beautifully! i've gone up to five tiers with them! never a collapse...knock on wood icon_surprised.gif i buy them from my local asian supply store and i get a bag of 100 for $1.49! i always buy 10 bags at a time b/c i burn through 100 in a month or so. they're wide and hollow and don't displace the cake. they're cheap and can be found in any city. you can cut them to any size and they don't splinter or get soaked with grease! win, win, win!




I like the great idea of them not splintering in the cake icon_smile.gif
However they ARE rather thin and hollow. I haven't done much stacking before but I'm really surprised? What type of cakes are you stacking with? Light spongy cakes, nothing too dense?

fondantgrl Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 6:13am
post #34 of 56

I do not do a lot of cakes, but I have not had a single stacked cake collapsed.. I use more than enough required dowel and I add a fat dowel at the center all the way thru from top to bottom. For a 10 inch 4 leayered cake I would use 11 dowels. But there could probably other reasons why this happened.. Heat and shifting while transposting can also contibute to this. Good luck next time.. Black ALWAYS turns purple when put under sun light. sorry to hear about your desaster., I do not use straws for they are really not meant for this purpose.. they are too weak. icon_sad.gif

DaPom Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 6:49am
post #35 of 56

I had a disaster with wooden dowels as well, and only use them when I'm out of options. When I do, I always use 2-3 cardboard cake boards on the bottm and drive a single dowel with a sharpened point all the way through all tiers and into the cardboard for added support.

My first disaster was a beautiful german chocolate stacked cake for a 50th birthday. I went to get my camera and when I turned back around it had gone from 6-10" layers (stacked) to a mess about 3" tall and all over the counter. After I sat on the kitchen floor and cried icon_cry.gif for about 20 minutes I scooped it all up into a crystal punch bowl, added some chocolate ganache and headed out to the party.

I just ordered some bubble tea straws to use for stacking. I've heard good things about them, and even that guy on TV uses them icon_wink.gif. I ordered mine on E-bay.

Don't give up, we all have disasters, just dust the sugar off and pick up your decorating bag again!! icon_smile.gif

chocolatestone Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 7:23am
post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof


I like the great idea of them not splintering in the cake icon_smile.gif
However they ARE rather thin and hollow. I haven't done much stacking before but I'm really surprised? What type of cakes are you stacking with? Light spongy cakes, nothing too dense?




I just used the straws for the first time this weekend and I loved them. They easier to cut than wooden dowels. When you insert the straws into the cakes they fill up with cake which makes them sturdier.

Sweet_Toof Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 7:47am
post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by chocolatestone

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof


I like the great idea of them not splintering in the cake icon_smile.gif
However they ARE rather thin and hollow. I haven't done much stacking before but I'm really surprised? What type of cakes are you stacking with? Light spongy cakes, nothing too dense?



I just used the straws for the first time this weekend and I loved them. They easier to cut than wooden dowels. When you insert the straws into the cakes they fill up with cake which makes them sturdier.




I just thought that's a lot of weight for a peice of thin plastic to be supporting? Much more affordable though....
With chocolate cakes, I was taught that if I had no dowels, I could stick a skewer into the cake, wriggle it around and take it out, and then fill the hole with melted chocolate. Of course this is only good for chocolate cakes I guess.

Sweet_Toof Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 7:49am
post #38 of 56

also, does everyone here use cardboard under each tier?

ramacake Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 8:11am
post #39 of 56

I always use SPS plates and columns. The brand I like the best is "Coast". They are available from Pheil and Holling. Their website is cakedeco.com They are listed under tier cake support systems. I only use the white colums, because I think the clear ones are more brittle and are harder to cut. they come in 7" and 9" columns. And you can cut them to whatever height you need, with a plumbers pipe cutter. And the plates come in sizes from 6" to 18". If you use these plates and columns, you will NEVER have a cake fall. And yes, I ALWAYS use a board under EVERY tier.

dnrlee Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 10:05am
post #40 of 56

I am so sorry!! I've only done 2 stacked cakes but I used the bubble tea straws and they worked great! As for the color change, I've heard of that being a Wilton issue before. The only time I use Wilton is if I'm doing a practice cake because I'm trying to use my Wilton supply up (hate to throw it away!)

costumeczar Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 11:22am
post #41 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof

also, does everyone here use cardboard under each tier?



I use tuffboards, they're really strong and are plastic so they don't need to be covered in any kind of waterproof paper before using them. http://tuffboardcakeboards.com/

BlakesCakes Posted 11 Oct 2010 , 10:57pm
post #42 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof

bubble tea straws...

I like the great idea of them not splintering in the cake icon_smile.gif
However they ARE rather thin and hollow. I haven't done much stacking before but I'm really surprised? What type of cakes are you stacking with? Light spongy cakes, nothing too dense?




In the physics of things, the hollow cylinder (a straw) is much stronger than a solid post (a dowel). The straw will take more pounds of direct pressure per inch than a wooden dowel.

If you press down on a straw, it takes a lot to bend it, let alone break it. If you press down on a wooden dowel, it will first bend, it may shift, and with enough pressure, it will break.

Rae

Sweet_Toof Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 1:57am
post #43 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof

bubble tea straws...

I like the great idea of them not splintering in the cake icon_smile.gif
However they ARE rather thin and hollow. I haven't done much stacking before but I'm really surprised? What type of cakes are you stacking with? Light spongy cakes, nothing too dense?



In the physics of things, the hollow cylinder (a straw) is much stronger than a solid post (a dowel). The straw will take more pounds of direct pressure per inch than a wooden dowel.

If you press down on a straw, it takes a lot to bend it, let alone break it. If you press down on a wooden dowel, it will first bend, it may shift, and with enough pressure, it will break.

Rae




I don't want to sound like a smarty pants, just trying to work out if I should convert to straws myself.... Won't the straws shift?

BlakesCakes Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 2:05am
post #44 of 56

If they're cut level and inserted straight, shifting is less likely than with thinner wooden dowels. The cake plug in the bottom of the straw helps to anchor it.

Rae

mcdonald Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 2:15am
post #45 of 56

I love bubble straws!! they are so easy to use..cutting and all and they are really sturdy!

UpAt2am Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 2:15am
post #46 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof

bubble tea straws...

I like the great idea of them not splintering in the cake icon_smile.gif
However they ARE rather thin and hollow. I haven't done much stacking before but I'm really surprised? What type of cakes are you stacking with? Light spongy cakes, nothing too dense?



In the physics of things, the hollow cylinder (a straw) is much stronger than a solid post (a dowel). The straw will take more pounds of direct pressure per inch than a wooden dowel.

If you press down on a straw, it takes a lot to bend it, let alone break it. If you press down on a wooden dowel, it will first bend, it may shift, and with enough pressure, it will break.

Rae



I don't want to sound like a smarty pants, just trying to work out if I should convert to straws myself.... Won't the straws shift?





they aren't that thin. have you seen a bubble tea straw before? they aren't like drinking straws, they're almost as wide as the plastic dowel rods that wilton sells. and yes, every tier needs a board underneath it, whether it's a cardboard cirlce, foamboard, etc.

madgeowens Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 2:20am
post #47 of 56

where do you get the bubble tea straws on line....no where that I know of around here..and where do you get foam boards to fit cakes instead of cardboard ones

UpAt2am Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 2:25am
post #48 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

where do you get the bubble tea straws on line....no where that I know of around here..and where do you get foam boards to fit cakes instead of cardboard ones




if you don't have any local asian food supply stores, i'd try a chinese/thai/asian restaurant. they may sell them to you? i know some people have gotten them on ebay and amazon, so try that! again, i can get them for $1.50/100 so if they're way higher than that, let me know. i'll buy them for you and ship them icon_smile.gif

madgeowens Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 2:41am
post #49 of 56

thanks I will google them...I asked in a chinese restrante and she looked at me like I had 2 heads lol

Renaejrk Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 3:09am
post #50 of 56

bubble tea straws are great! I was nervous about using them but they work wonderfully - and much easier to cut! The Wilton black definitely has purple issues, but I use Americolor and it is wonderful - never had a problem with being purple.

costumeczar Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 10:54am
post #51 of 56

I just want to emphasize that the straws people are talking about using are NOT the same straws as the ones they use in McDonalds. I've heard horror stories from reception sits about people puttig regular drinking straws into cakes and the cakes collapsing. It sounds like a lot of people here might be confused about the type of straw peopel are recommending, so make sure you're using the bubble tea straws, not regular ones.

trixieleigh Posted 12 Oct 2010 , 4:07pm
post #52 of 56

I understand bubble tea straws are different than regular straws. Are they similar to sonic straws? You know, the big red ones? I use those frequently for 2 tiered cakes, and they have worked wonderfully! I bought a big bag from them for a few bucks.

UpAt2am Posted 13 Oct 2010 , 8:33pm
post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by trixieleigh

I understand bubble tea straws are different than regular straws. Are they similar to sonic straws? You know, the big red ones? I use those frequently for 2 tiered cakes, and they have worked wonderfully! I bought a big bag from them for a few bucks.




even bigger than those! they are made for "boba" tea, which is a tea served in asian rest. that has tapioca pearls in it. so the straw has to be super wide so the pearls can be sucked up it, along with the tea. they measure 1/2 inch in diameter. i believe it's primarily found in thai rest.

lanana Posted 14 Oct 2010 , 4:48pm
post #54 of 56

i used to use wooden dowels and 2 of my cakes collapsed. I decide to use hollow plastic dowels, which i cut with a pvc cutter ($12 at home depot). I use enough dowels!!!more than 6 for sure on the bigger tiers and 4 on the smaller ones. Since i changed the way i stacked, no other collapsing problem for me. And finally i use a wooden dowel, i sharp one end and pass it all through the all stacked cake for better stability.

hilly Posted 17 Oct 2010 , 8:39pm
post #55 of 56

Another bubble tea straw advocate here. Love them, so easy to use, sturdy and cheap!

Ironbaker Posted 19 Oct 2010 , 3:53am
post #56 of 56

Leah converted me - SPS all the way. I used it again recently for a 3 tier cake, fully stacked before delivery....in Atlanta traffic and had to come to a sudden stop. Nothing moved. I am a firm believer!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%