Sheet Cake Help Please

Decorating By Tlcs Updated 6 Oct 2010 , 2:55am by Tlcs

Tlcs Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 1:22pm
post #1 of 20

Help please-- I need a sheet cake to feed about 200 and the largest pan I can use is 11x15--small oven icon_sad.gif . If I put two side by side and torte and fill that doesn't quite get me there. How about a total of four two side by side and two on top? How many servings would that be and what size would the pieces be? I'd like to keep the cakes flat and not tiered. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks icon_smile.gif

19 replies
caymancake Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 1:35pm
post #2 of 20

An 11x15 that is torted should give you about 60 servings (party sized - 1.5x2x4). You'll get a little extra if its wedding sized (not sure what your event is). So if you put the 4 cakes together, you should definitely have enough to feed 200 with extras...hope that helps!

BTW - here is one the go to guides I use when figuring out servings...I have it on my favourites - it's been a real help icon_smile.gif.

http://bakedecoratecelebrate.com/techniques/amountbakingguide.cfm

ddaigle Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 1:39pm
post #3 of 20

Wow! THat's a lot of sheet cake! Our (single) full sheets serve 100. A double full sheet will be HUGE and HEAVY. When we need that many servings we always do 2. Is this an option for you?

Tlcs Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 1:54pm
post #4 of 20

Thank you both. It's for a HS sports dinner and will be decorated like the field the boys play on so one cake is much better than two.

Tlcs Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 1:56pm
post #5 of 20

Cayman do you suggest torting both the bottom and top layers or just filling between the two layers?

CWR41 Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 2:05pm
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by caymancake

An 11x15 that is torted should give you about 60 servings (party sized - 1.5x2x4). You'll get a little extra if its wedding sized (not sure what your event is). So if you put the 4 cakes together, you should definitely have enough to feed 200 with extras...hope that helps!

BTW - here is one the go to guides I use when figuring out servings...I have it on my favourites - it's been a real help icon_smile.gif.

http://bakedecoratecelebrate.com/techniques/amountbakingguide.cfm




If you read the key to your chart, it says:
This chart shows baking information and serving amounts for 2-in. deep pans. The figures for 2-in. pans are based on a 2-layer or 4-in. high cake; fill pans 1/2 to 2/3 full.

So, a single-layer 2-in. high 11 x 15 serves 30. Four cakes together = 120.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 2:26pm
post #7 of 20

Clarification: The cake that will serve 60 is two layers of 11x15 with filing and frosting(Frosting and filling could be the same. Each layer does not need to be torted for this event.)

That said, you would need four of these cakes to make your 200 mark. I would put two of these large (and heavy!) cakes together to make a football field. I would keep the other two in the background to cut ahead of time. 200 servings is a lot to prepare!

For a project like this, could the next size pan fit? It would save some work!

caymancake Posted 2 Oct 2010 , 11:21pm
post #8 of 20

The serving sizes are based on 2, 2" tall cakes. I never torte cakes that large because I always end up with ripped cake LOL! I would just bake the two cakes and fill inbetween. There was another poster who recommended keeping two cakes in the back for serving...if this is an option for you - it is a GREAT idea icon_smile.gif That way you don't get stuck trying to lug a HUGE and heavy cake to the event icon_smile.gif.

Please let us know how it turns out! Hope that helps!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tlcs

Cayman do you suggest torting both the bottom and top layers or just filling between the two layers?


indydebi Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 12:17am
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly

Clarification: The cake that will serve 60 is two layers of 11x15 with filing and frosting(Frosting and filling could be the same. Each layer does not need to be torted for this event.)

That said, you would need four of these cakes to make your 200 mark.



Just to clarify, what you're saying is she would have to bake EIGHT of the 11x15 cakes to make FOUR of the 2-layer cakes as you described above.

I say for a job like this, it would be in your best interest to invest in a 12x18 pan, if it will fit in your oven. you'd only need to bake four of these (each one serves approx 50, single layer).

I baked a cake for the governor's office that involved four 14x22 cakes (yep, I found a 14x22 pan and I LUV'D it!!!), which I assembled as a 2-layer, 28x22 cake. I couldn't lift it!!! thank god one of my brides came by and volunteered to go with me to deliver this cake or I don't know what I would have done! icon_surprised.gif So be sure you know how much you can lift or have a helper on stand by.

cakeythings1961 Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 1:37am
post #10 of 20

Whatever configuration you use, don't forget to plan for a really strong board to put under the cake. Maybe 1/4" plywood? Best of luck to you...I sure the team will love it!

SugarFrosted Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 4:53am
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeythings1961

Whatever configuration you use, don't forget to plan for a really strong board to put under the cake. Maybe 1/4" plywood? Best of luck to you...I sure the team will love it!




I'd recommend 1/2" or 5/8" plywood for something that large. I'd be wary that 1/4" wouldn't be heavy-duty enough.

Evoir Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 5:07am
post #12 of 20

Agrre with SugarFrosted. Go the heavy duty board.

cakeythings1961 Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 1:02pm
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarFrosted

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeythings1961

Whatever configuration you use, don't forget to plan for a really strong board to put under the cake. Maybe 1/4" plywood? Best of luck to you...I sure the team will love it!



I'd recommend 1/2" or 5/8" plywood for something that large. I'd be wary that 1/4" wouldn't be heavy-duty enough.




That's good to know. I've never had to use plywood for a cake, but I can't imagine having to carry 2-4 sheet cakes at once!!! For future reference, what kind of materials would you suggest to cover the plywood? tia

CWR41 Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 2:43pm
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeythings1961

For future reference, what kind of materials would you suggest to cover the plywood? tia




I'd use colored or white Poly-foil from the florist, or fanci-foil from Wilton.

SugarFrosted Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 11:45pm
post #15 of 20

My husbands cuts the plywood boards for me, and sands and rounds the edges slightly. I use white Contact which covers the whole board (top, bottom, edges) sealing the underside with heavy clear package mailing tape. This gives the board a wipe clean surface. Generally I cover the boards with carefully applied (read: NO wrinkles or marks) heavy duty foil which is taped to the underside of the board with painters tape. I also provide a cutter/server with a smooth edge, which will not cut or shred the foil, so it also won't cut into my board. My clients always return my boards and servers.

Some people complain about the "tackiness" of covering a board with foil. But in my opinion, when the board is neat, tidy, and tightly wrapped, the board itself becomes incidental to the presentation.... especially when the sheet cake on it is well iced and decorated.

cakeythings1961 Posted 4 Oct 2010 , 3:20am
post #16 of 20

Thanks CRW41 & Sugar Frosted! I'll be doing a double sheet cake for the holiday mixer that my son's fraternity hosts every December, and this will really make things easier for me. icon_smile.gif

CWR41 Posted 4 Oct 2010 , 4:09am
post #17 of 20

I also use white Contact paper on plywood boards (like SugarFrosted) underneath the poly-foil. It makes it easier for anyone to dispose of the crumb-covered foil after serving, yet shows a nice clean washable surface for reuse rather than a porous icky hunk of wood. (Remember to write on the back with permanant marker "return to:" plus your phone number if you want your boards returned and charge a deposit.)

Also, the poly-foil doesn't rip or tear very easily and doesn't shred up with knife cuts either. It has a plastic layer in the middle of the two layers of foil... very durable.

Keep in mind, your cake should always be on its own corrugated cake board when using coverings that you aren't certain to be food-safe, like Contact paper.

Evoir Posted 4 Oct 2010 , 4:17am
post #18 of 20

I like to offer a refund if my clients choose to return the board, but its not compulsory. As the board cost is built into my quote, it is just an incentive really for them to return the board for some money back, rather than forcing them to return something they feel they have paid a special fee/deposit for.

I use MDF board covered in cake foil. Plus all my cakes sit on an additional silver cake cardboard.

SugarFrosted Posted 4 Oct 2010 , 4:52am
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

I also use white Contact paper on plywood boards (like SugarFrosted) underneath the poly-foil. It makes it easier for anyone to dispose of the crumb-covered foil after serving, yet shows a nice clean washable surface for reuse rather than a porous icky hunk of wood. (Remember to write on the back with permanant marker "return to:" plus your phone number if you want your boards returned and charge a deposit.)

Also, the poly-foil doesn't rip or tear very easily and doesn't shred up with knife cuts either. It has a plastic layer in the middle of the two layers of foil... very durable.

Keep in mind, your cake should always be on its own corrugated cake board when using coverings that you aren't certain to be food-safe, like Contact paper.




I use the book tape to "seal" a larger version of my business card to the back of my boards, with instructions to return the board within one week.
In 22 years, I have only "lost" one board when a client's HUSBAND threw it away.

Men! What good are they! icon_wink.gif
just kidding!

Tlcs Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 2:55am
post #20 of 20

Hi everyone thank you for your quick responses, ideas and advice. Much appreciated. I'll post a picture of the cake when I'm finished.

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