How Would I Go About Making Black Scroll On A Wedding Cake?

Decorating By CarolLee Updated 3 Jun 2011 , 4:03am by akgirl10

CarolLee Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 8:04pm
post #1 of 18

I have a wedding cake this weekend. The bride wants black scroll-work done on the top sides of the cake (3 tier). Today I practiced and really did a lousy job. Any suggestions? I have a fairly steady hand but working on the sides are difficult for me - oh, and it's butter cream. I could Paint it on fondant. Not so with butter cream.

17 replies
DSmo Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 8:21pm
post #2 of 18

Run over to Michael's and pick up some Wilton press sets. You can lightly press the pattern in the buttercream, then just pipe over the pattern.

imagenthatnj Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 8:32pm
post #3 of 18

Your cake sides have to be at eye level.

Some people work on that Wilton wheel, the one that slants.

It's better if you use a cone made of parchment paper with the tiniest cut.

You can get the Wilton press sets, but if you have a specific scroll you want to imprint, you'll have to do it some other way.

Some piping videos:



arosstx Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 8:52pm
post #5 of 18

To get your cake at eye level, use an upside down 20lb empty fondant bucket. I place that on my counter, then put my regular cake turntable on it, then the cake. Makes life SO much easier!

Sassy74 Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 9:00pm
post #6 of 18

I've done a few cakes with scrollwork, and I was terrified to do the first one lol !!! But, with lots of practice beforehand, I found that it's not so bad.

I use a #1 or #2 tip, depending on the size of the tier, and a thinner medium consistency RI. I don't use presses because I'm afraid I won't be able to pipe EXACTLY over the imprint, then it'll show.

I practiced on a cutting board at least a half a dozen times just to get the right feel for pressure and arm movement. I steady my tip with my left hand and move my whole arm when I pipe (if that makes sense).

For me, the most critical part is correctly dividing my cake into sections so that my pattern is even, and making sure I get even spacing. If needed, I'll lightly mark my cake with a toothpick to get even height/spacing.

I'd recommend practice practice practice. HTH!

arosstx Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 9:08pm
post #7 of 18

I get asked about my scrollwork a lot, so maybe this will help. You can go look at some of my pictures as well to get an idea of what I do.

I basically go around each tier, piping big "S" shapes all over, and in different directions, trying not to have any pointing exactly the same way. Then in the "holes" that are left, I pipe "C" shapes. Then I go back and add little curls off the "S" shapes to kind of fill it in. It's all freehand.

Practice is what makes it easy. And if you do practice, on a cutting board or whatever, make sure you tilt it up to mimic piping on the side of a cake.

Good luck! thumbs_up.gif

VNatividad Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 9:28pm
post #8 of 18

Hi Arosstx, I love your work. One question about the bead border you have on you 65th anniversary cake. What tip size did you use? I'm big believer in practice, practice , practice. Would you mind sharing your technique when piping this border. It's beautiful!

Sassy74 Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 9:30pm
post #9 of 18

Forgot to mention that, YES, you need to have your cake at eye level, and tilted upward. I put my cake on a tall turntable and put a styro wedge under the front to lift it up. Makes a huge difference!

VNatividad Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 9:43pm
post #10 of 18

This tutorial is what helped me the most, my pipe work has improved 100% since watching Denise pipe. No where near her expertise but I appreciate this video soooo much, love it!

http://sugarteachers.blogspot.com/2010/07/creating-scrolls-on-your-cake-by-denise.html

imagenthatnj Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 9:52pm
post #11 of 18

I know that you'll be piping black on white buttercream, and that in itself is kind of scary.

Do you think (or have you tried) some other way? Making the scrolls separately and then attaching them to the cake? Kind of like this:

http://inspiredbycake.blogspot.com/2009/04/piping-with-black-royal-icing.html

http:[email protected]/3490140677/in/set-72157623120353236/

http:[email protected]/3490974658/in/set-72157623120353236/

http:[email protected]/3422618630/in/set-72157623120353236/

jmr531 Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 9:56pm
post #12 of 18

As grandmomof1 mentioned, you can get scroll cutters. If you are still not confident in your piping skills after more practice, you could cut out the scrolls from fondant and attach them to the buttercream covered cake. Make sure the fondant is very thin.

fba322 Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 10:17pm
post #13 of 18

I wonder if you could do the scrolls on wax paper the same as a frozen buttercream transfer. That was if you make a mistake, you just fix it rather than make the mistake directly on the cake. Once frozen then you can just wrap it around the cake. I have not tried this myself, but maybe some others have.

CNCS Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 10:20pm
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by arosstx

To get your cake at eye level, use an upside down 20lb empty fondant bucket. I place that on my counter, then put my regular cake turntable on it, then the cake. Makes life SO much easier!




Make sure you use a non skid mat. I learned the hard way. icon_cry.gif

ecmc Posted 28 May 2011 , 5:31am
post #15 of 18

Thanks for the video posts! That are awesome!

cakegirl1973 Posted 28 May 2011 , 6:16am
post #16 of 18

I read a post today about taking a piece of glass from a picture frame, piping in RI the pattern in revse, letting the RI harden, and then placing the glass onto the side of the cake to emboss the cake with your piped pattern. Then, you pipe onto top of the embossed pattern. Haven't tried it yet, but thought that might be a good technique to try. I'd post a link to that thread, but I'm on my phone, so I can't do links. Good luck!

mena2002 Posted 28 May 2011 , 6:21am
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by arosstx

I get asked about my scrollwork a lot, so maybe this will help. You can go look at some of my pictures as well to get an idea of what I do.

I basically go around each tier, piping big "S" shapes all over, and in different directions, trying not to have any pointing exactly the same way. Then in the "holes" that are left, I pipe "C" shapes. Then I go back and add little curls off the "S" shapes to kind of fill it in. It's all freehand.

Practice is what makes it easy. And if you do practice, on a cutting board or whatever, make sure you tilt it up to mimic piping on the side of a cake.

Good luck! thumbs_up.gif




Thanks for sharing your technique, I will definitely be trying it out.

akgirl10 Posted 3 Jun 2011 , 4:03am
post #18 of 18

I've printed out scroll patterns and traced them with a thin line of piping gel. Then lightly press against the cake for an almost invisible pattern to trace.

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