Gum Paste Rose Tips

Decorating By pag41989 Updated 29 Sep 2010 , 8:30pm by sillywabbitz

pag41989 Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 6:39pm
post #1 of 9

I am currently in between making gum paste roses and I feel like they don't look the way I want them to. I have watched Edna's tutorial which was amazing and very helpful but I feel like my roses don't look very lifelike. Does anyone have any tips? I know Ron Ben Israel uses soup spoons to help with the shape of the rose petals. Also, how do you dust roses? Do you dust the petals then put the rose together or do you put the rose together then dust the petal? thanks in advance!

8 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 6:45pm
post #2 of 9

This is the video that has been most helpful to me:




I dust the roses after they're made. It's easier to tell where the color needs to go when you're looking at a finished rose.

Cake4ever Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 7:06pm
post #3 of 9

It's nice if you can lightly color your paste, make the rose, then dust with a contrasting or highlighting shade once dry. It really brings it to life. Check out flickr for real rose garden roses so you can see the shapes, colors, and shades that make a rose.

For me, I prefer that my roses don't look perfect. I think they look more realistic if they're not perfect. I am surrounded by over 40 rose bushes and am amazed by their beauty and imperfections.

sillywabbitz Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 7:22pm
post #4 of 9

I use the same tutorials Texas Rose posted but I did get a hint from a lady who specialized in gumpaste flowers. If your roses are colored, the petals should be lighter as they come out of the center of the rose. So she said to color your gumpaste and do all the centers and first layer of petals. Then add a little white to the gumpaste and make your next round of petals. And continue doing this. I think it gave my flowers a very delicate feel.
You can see them here.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1800635

I didn't take a close up of just the roses..sorry.

pag41989 Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 7:26pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillywabbitz

I use the same tutorials Texas Rose posted but I did get a hint from a lady who specialized in gumpaste flowers. If your roses are colored, the petals should be lighter as they come out of the center of the rose. So she said to color your gumpaste and do all the centers and first layer of petals. Then add a little white to the gumpaste and make your next round of petals. And continue doing this. I think it gave my flowers a very delicate feel.
You can see them here.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1800635

I didn't take a close up of just the roses..sorry.




That is a beautiful cake! Where can I find white food color? Could I add some white gumpaste and have the same effect?

Texas_Rose Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 7:35pm
post #6 of 9

You can get white food color at the craft store, but I think she meant to add some white gumpaste in.

I'm lazy, unless I need a really dark color of roses, I make them all white and then just dust to get the colors I want.
Image

sillywabbitz Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 7:46pm
post #7 of 9

Thanks for the compliment. It was my first wedding cake and first attempt at roses. Texas Rose is right, I just meant to add a little white gumpaste to it...I have a pasta roller attachment for my kitchen aid and I had to make a lot of roses so I colored a big chunk of gumpaste yellow.
Did all my centers and all my first layers. Then I took whatever was left and added some white gumpaste. I just guessed at the amount but I wanted a slight difference not a noticeable difference. Made all the next layers and while those were drying added more white to whatever gumpaste I had left over. I just did that until I was done.

Texas Rose those are beautiful. I really need to work on my dusting. Do you let the roses dry completely or are they still a bit soft when you dust?

Texas_Rose Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 8:05pm
post #8 of 9

Let them dry completely. Depending on the dust, sometimes you have to scrub with the paintbrush to get enough color into the petal. For the ones in the picture, I used Wilton dusts...copper, yellow and pink. You can use grated chalk too.

You can steam them to set the dust. Just boil a pan of water and hold the flowers over it until they start looking dewy, then let them dry before you do anything else with them.

sillywabbitz Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 8:30pm
post #9 of 9

Thanks. I did some white ones and "tipped" the edges with red petal dust and that worked but when I tried to dust dust them it came out blotchy..maybe I'm using the wrong brush or something.

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