KrazyAboutCake Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 11:21pm
post #1 of

Please sign the online petition to get the Florida Cottage Food Act Passed.
Send this link to all your family, friends and email buddies.

http://www.petitiononline.com/FLcottag/petition.html

Thank you,
Barbara

25 replies
iamelms Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 11:40pm
post #2 of

Do you know how many they'll need to pass this?

Tug Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 11:45pm
post #3 of

Thanks for getting this out for everyone to sign

BORIKS03 Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 11:46pm
post #4 of

thanks for posting

hugsfrombev Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 11:53pm
post #5 of

Thank you so much for this! Read...sent....and shared! thumbs_up.gif

jason_kraft Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 11:55pm
post #6 of

In order to place an initiative on the FL ballot for 2010 or 2012, you would need the verified signatures of 67,683 Florida residents. Online petitions don't count, they must be signed on paper.

[code:1:1f1599f33c]http://election.dos.state.fl.us/constitutional-amendments/init-peti-process.shtml[/code:1:1f1599f33c]


However, this petition could still be useful for making FL lawmakers aware of the issue so they can pass a law on their own.

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 12:08am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonkraft



However, this petition could still be useful for making FL lawmakers aware of the issue so they can pass a law on their own.




That's exactly what we're doing...making FL lawmakers aware of the issue.

LuvLyrics Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 12:31am
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonkraft

In order to place an initiative on the FL ballot for 2010 or 2012, you would need the verified signatures of 67,683 Florida residents. Online petitions don't count, they must be signed on paper.

Code:http://election.dos.state.fl.us/constitutional-amendments/init-peti-process.shtml


However, this petition could still be useful for making FL lawmakers aware of the issue so they can pass a law on their own.




So should we print out a petition and have people sign? if that's the case, let us print one and have everyone we know sign it.

jason_kraft Posted 29 Sep 2010 , 12:39am
post #9 of

The process for creating an official petition is a little more involved, see my link above for the steps. It's too late for the 2010 ballot, but it might be possible for 2012 if someone takes the initiative to create a Cottage Food Act PAC (the deadline for certifying signatures would be Feb 1, 2012).

KrazyAboutCake Posted 5 Oct 2010 , 11:07pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonkraft

The process for creating an official petition is a little more involved, see my link above for the steps. It's too late for the 2010 ballot, but it might be possible for 2012 if someone takes the initiative to create a Cottage Food Act PAC (the deadline for certifying signatures would be Feb 1, 2012).


jasonkraft, the information you provided regarding the number of people needed for a petition in Florida is incorrect. If you read the information on the website that information pertains to anyone wanting to run for a political office NOT for getting a bill passed into law or to ammend an exisiting law. The year 2012 is the year for anyone wanting to run for President and they need 8% of the last election to be able to apply to run for office. The candidates have two years to run for President and the election is 2014.

I have looked on the web to see if I could find an answer to this question and have not found it. I even asked a state representative and congressman and they didn't know either. I believe the more signatures we get the better, I would think we need at least a couple thousand names for something this simple. I already have two representative that agreed to help get the Act passed but it is an election year and they have to wait until after November 3rd.

Keep watching Florida we will be the next state that has the Cottage Food Act implemented just like the other 25 states.

jason_kraft Posted 5 Oct 2010 , 11:50pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KrazyAboutCake

jasonkraft, the information you provided regarding the number of people needed for a petition in Florida is incorrect. If you read the information on the website that information pertains to anyone wanting to run for a political office NOT for getting a bill passed into law or to ammend an exisiting law.



The information from that web site pertains to proposing amendments to the FL constitution, which can be added to the ballot. Where did you see that it has to do with running for political office?

election.dos.state.fl.us/constitutional-amendments/init-peti-process.shtml

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 12:07am
Quote:
Originally Posted by KrazyAboutCake

Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonkraft

The process for creating an official petition is a little more involved, see my link above for the steps. It's too late for the 2010 ballot, but it might be possible for 2012 if someone takes the initiative to create a Cottage Food Act PAC (the deadline for certifying signatures would be Feb 1, 2012).

jasonkraft, the information you provided regarding the number of people needed for a petition in Florida is incorrect. If you read the information on the website that information pertains to anyone wanting to run for a political office NOT for getting a bill passed into law or to ammend an exisiting law. The year 2012 is the year for anyone wanting to run for President and they need 8% of the last election to be able to apply to run for office. The candidates have two years to run for President and the election is 2014.

I have looked on the web to see if I could find an answer to this question and have not found it. I even asked a state representative and congressman and they didn't know either. I believe the more signatures we get the better, I would think we need at least a couple thousand names for something this simple. I already have two representative that agreed to help get the Act passed but it is an election year and they have to wait until after November 3rd.

Keep watching Florida we will be the next state that has the Cottage Food Act implemented just like the other 25 states.




thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

jasonkraft, not sure why you're so worried about this. You don't even live in Florida. Leave it alone.

jason_kraft Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 12:22am
Quote:
Originally Posted by butterflygirl30

jasonkraft, not sure why you're so worried about this. You don't even live in Florida. Leave it alone.



I'm not sure why you're so worried about me participating in this discussion...California has a similar process for creating propositions (and a similar lack of a home baking law), so it will be interesting to see what happens in FL. It's probably easier to get the attention of state reps than it is to put together a voter-backed initiative, but the problem with the former method is that the bill is often a very low priority and ends up being ignored (as it did in TX).

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 12:30am
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonkraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by butterflygirl30

jasonkraft, not sure why you're so worried about this. You don't even live in Florida. Leave it alone.


I'm not sure why you're so worried about me participating in this discussion...California has a similar process for creating propositions (and a similar lack of a home baking law), so it will be interesting to see what happens in FL. It's probably easier to get the attention of state reps than it is to put together a voter-backed initiative, but the problem with the former method is that the bill is often a very low priority and ends up being ignored (as it did in TX).




You're not bringing anything positive to the discussion. Barb has done extensive research and we're very positive about a good outcome.

jhay Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 12:42am

Signed and sent to all my friends on Facebook! Let's do this people!

jason_kraft Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 12:43am

Wow, why the hostility? icon_razz.gif

In order to help the effort in CA, it would help to know what you guys are doing in FL, since you seem to be pretty organized. Are you also pursuing a voter-backed initiative and forming a PAC in addition to coordinating with state reps to sponsor new legislation?

kelleym Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 2:26am
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonkraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by butterflygirl30

jasonkraft, not sure why you're so worried about this. You don't even live in Florida. Leave it alone.


I'm not sure why you're so worried about me participating in this discussion...California has a similar process for creating propositions (and a similar lack of a home baking law), so it will be interesting to see what happens in FL. It's probably easier to get the attention of state reps than it is to put together a voter-backed initiative, but the problem with the former method is that the bill is often a very low priority and ends up being ignored (as it did in TX).



It was NOT ignored. Not even close. Please don't spread misinformation like that.

jason_kraft Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 2:39am

http://www.texascottagefoodlaw.com/

Quote:
Quote:

In the 2009 Legislative Session, Texas State Representative Dan Gattis filed a bill which would make it legal to sell non-potentially hazardous bakery items prepared in residential kitchens. It was House Bill 3282.

The bill was unanimously voted out of committee for a floor vote. However, it, along with hundreds of others, died on the calendar when it was not read by the deadline of the stroke of midnight on Thursday 5/14/09. It was on page 17 of 25. The legislature made it to page 8.




Perhaps not completely ignored, but it didn't have enough support to prioritize it higher on the agenda. To pass cottage food laws in any state, the goal should be to introduce the legislation with enough support to give it a priority high enough to make the cut...just getting it to the floor is not enough. That said, it sounds like the push for the FL law is off to a good start, and I wish you the best of luck. icon_smile.gif

kelleym Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 2:47am

Jason, that is my web site, and it was my bill. I know what I wrote. I was there, and I know what happened. You do not understand the full scope of what happened, and you are (again) misinterpreting what you read.

jason_kraft Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 2:50am
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelleym

Jason, that is my web site, and it was my bill. I know what I wrote. I was there, and I know what happened. You do not understand the full scope of what happened, and you are (again) misinterpreting what you read.



Thanks for putting together that web site, it's a great resource!

I would love to hear the full story of what happened with that TX bill.

Maria925 Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 2:55am

Awesome! Signed and passed along...

KrazyAboutCake Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 10:56am

jasonkraft, I got the information right from the website on the first page. You see there are constitution and than there are state statutes. Two different things. Everystate and in fact every county in each state can have their own rules. You would think they would all be the same since we are hince United States, but, that is not the case. In Georgia it is by each county to regulate the laws for baking from home.

Here is a link on "How An Idea Becomes Law" maybe this will help everyone here understand the process.
http://www.leg.state.or.us/process.html

The first thing to do is to get a State Representative to sponsor the idea once that is done than it gets passed on to the House and all the way to the Govenor to sign. Our petition and (yes you can get a pad of paper and copy the information from the online petition and go get hand written signatures.) To get this done the Representatives need to know there is a need and a want. The petition shows that, it is all about power by numbers the more people you can get to support the idea the better chance youhave getting it passed. If it doesn't happen this year doesn't mean to give up.

cakefairy03 Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 12:16pm

Normally I don't put myself in the middle of the nasty discussions, but I don't see why some of you are picking on jasonkraft. From what I'm reading, he is not being mean (unlike some of you), but trying to help. Maybe he knows someone in Florida and he wants to help them. Or maybe he will move to Florida. You don't know his story just like he may not know yours. But at least he is being civil about it! Plus, I don't understand why you are pushing someone away who may eventually help you out later. We would all like to see a bill like this pass, to allow us to bake and sell from home. The way I see it, the MORE help we can get, the better! No matter who or where it comes from!

jason_kraft Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 2:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KrazyAboutCake

jasonkraft, I got the information right from the website on the first page. You see there are constitution and than there are state statutes. Two different things. Everystate and in fact every county in each state can have their own rules. You would think they would all be the same since we are hince United States, but, that is not the case. In Georgia it is by each county to regulate the laws for baking from home.

Here is a link on "How An Idea Becomes Law" maybe this will help everyone here understand the process.
http://www.leg.state.or.us/process.html



You had stated that I was incorrect because my original link was about people running for political office, I'm still not sure where you found that in the original link.

You are correct that the state constitution and state statutes are two different things. However, FL provides a way for voters to amend the state constitution directly without the involvement of the legislature (similar to CA's proposition process)...that's what my link was all about. It seems that at least starting toward this end -- which is admittedly a tough road -- will at best result in an amendment placed on a ballot, and at worst show lawmakers that home bakers are organized and willing to take their case directly to the people.

I understand what you guys are doing with the online petition, I'm just suggesting potential next steps (creating an officially sanctioned petition with hand-collected signatures and forming a PAC) that might carry more weight.

jason_kraft Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 3:25pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefairy03

Normally I don't put myself in the middle of the nasty discussions, but I don't see why some of you are picking on jasonkraft. From what I'm reading, he is not being mean (unlike some of you), but trying to help.



I actually have no connection to FL...but I do see FL (which has a proposition process) as a potential bellwether for other states to pass this law without relying on the state legislature. I'm not sure if it can be done, as a LOT of real signatures will be required, but if FL can jump that hurdle and get a cottage food law on the ballot it would be hard to imagine that it wouldn't be voted through by the people -- unless there is opposition from food service unions.

And don't worry too much about the tone of some of these posts...a little animosity is normal when an "outsider" comes in and challenges the status quo. I take it as feedback that I'm on the right path. icon_smile.gif

snowboarder Posted 6 Oct 2010 , 6:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefairy03

but I don't see why some of you are picking on jasonkraft.




Because his questions are perfectly logical and reasonable, but they don't have the answers to them?

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