Smbc Under Fondant Users??

Decorating By cocobean Updated 3 Oct 2010 , 11:55pm by litlecuchi

cocobean Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:44am
post #1 of 43

Have you used smbc under your fondant. I went to a wedding the other day and had a piece of cake like that. It was great. I realized it was probably the reason the the fondant was so flawless. Am I correct? I think it is probably the same reasoning as using chocolate ganache under fondant. You probably smooth the icing and refridgerate and smooth again until you have very sharp edges. The cold smbc must be nice and hard and give a great surface for the fondant. Is that correct??

42 replies
KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 5:00am
post #2 of 43

You are correct.

cocobean Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 5:12am
post #3 of 43

So Kimmy, is that what you always use under fondant? It seems like a much better choice than the ganache people are using because not everything goes with chocolate.

Can't wait to give it a try. Only one little thing. I hate making SMBC! icon_confused.gif

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 5:15am
post #4 of 43

If it's not a meringue bc I'm using, it's ganache. I can't stomach the smell or texture, or really anything about American bc's. Ganche is a bit rich at times, so I only do it if someone asks or it makes sense for the design.

cocobean Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 5:29am
post #5 of 43

Now I'm going to have to learn to love making SMBC. icon_confused.gif Or even IMBC.

I'd love to hear some more positive comments about this technique.

Thanks for sharring yours! icon_smile.gif Also, do you use IMBC underneath the fondant?

amyoungbl00d5 Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 5:52am
post #6 of 43

There is a great tutorial on Facebook by RL CAKES ( he is a teenager and a fantastic caker) I wish I could use SMBC but I live in the deep south where it is too humid and hot most of the year to use that recipe. I hope that helps...good luck!

tonedna Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 6:27am
post #7 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by amyoungbl00d5

There is a great tutorial on Facebook by RL CAKES ( he is a teenager and a fantastic caker) I wish I could use SMBC but I live in the deep south where it is too humid and hot most of the year to use that recipe. I hope that helps...good luck!




Im with ya..although I am not a fan of butter based buttercream, the thought of all that butter, I just cant stand it.
Edna icon_smile.gif

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 2:29pm
post #8 of 43

Isn't that funny? All that butter makes people gag, and all that Crisco is delicious to others. To each his/her own.

imagenthatnj Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 2:45pm
post #9 of 43

After you get the hang of it, I think IMBC is a lot easier to make than SMBC. Your thermometer will do the work for you. I made SMBC once, then I got good at making IMBC; I'll never do the Swiss again.

Crisco, yikes... I totally dislike it. I don't even like looking at it.

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 2:55pm
post #10 of 43

[quote="cocobean"}
I'd love to hear some more positive comments about this technique.
[/quote]

It really makes the difference between you and probably 90% of decorators out there. Most people use a Crisco or some other lardish like substance to make their bc.

Offering a meringue bc is a step up if you will, towards the higher end of the cake world. Not trying to offend, but there's a difference. Spago and Pizza Hut certainly offer different things, Spago being the more gourmet, so please don't rail me for making my claims unless you want to slam other gourment restaurants as well. And every other place that has ever touted their products as being better than the average. Not directed at you coco, but the ones that will inevitably argue with me.

It's not sickly sweet, it's very creamy but light, and never gritty or greasy.

It can be smoother ultra smooth and shiny, when done right, the sharpest of all edges beneath fondant, and is generally just the most delicious stuff ever if you make it right and don't use salted butter.

lollyponpon Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 3:15pm
post #11 of 43

oh wow reading this thread has really given me a reason to try SMBC!@
i had read a lot about it, but had no idea what the taste or texture would be--but as I also cannot stomach the SMELL of american buttercream, let alone eat it--this may be an alternative for me@@ I'm definately looking for an icing that isn;t nauseating or ganache LOL!! I love my ganache but as mentioned--it limits what flavours you can use!!
Woohooo off to find the SMBC recipe!!

GGFan Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 3:52pm
post #12 of 43

Hi KimmyKakes4Me: I'm in california (southern) too. Do you offer buttercream cake? If so, how do you handle delivering meringue BC covered cake in the summer? Do you deliver all stacked or assemble on site? I love to eat merigue BC myself but I found it's so hard to assemble on site because the BC turn soft by the time I get to the party. Thank you icon_biggrin.gif

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:00pm
post #13 of 43

You keep it completely chilled, like rock hard. If you're in an air conditioned car going to an air conditioned venue, there really is no issue whatsoever. I calculate how much time between delivery to actual cutting time when gauging when to take it out of fridge.

And yeah, meringues and ganaches are all I do, I don't offer other bcs at all.

cocobean Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:15pm
post #14 of 43

Thanks for all the comments about how you guys like the taste or not of meringue bc.
Looking for more positive comments on how people like to use it under fondant because of the sharpe edges it can make.

Anymore decorators with that experience. icon_smile.gif Do you find that the edges stay sharpe looking after it warms up?

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:20pm
post #15 of 43

It stays exactly how it is when you are all done. When you're working with cold bc, the fondant gets locked into shape, and stays exactly that way.

imagenthatnj Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:24pm
post #16 of 43

We discussed this in a thread about ganache. I think AngelFood4, one of our members, have used IMBC under fondant too.

Not sure if you can find it in her blog.
http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/

This is the thread, and maybe you can PM her. She was giving us tips on how to keep sharp edges, and how to use the upside down method (gasp).
http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6946113-.html&sid=4b7256fc52892bda0f7bb667d98b5509

mpetty Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:32pm
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimmyKakes4Me

It stays exactly how it is when you are all done. When you're working with cold bc, the fondant gets locked into shape, and stays exactly that way.




So much advice can be confusing - I've read elsewhere that cold cake is one of the reasons for air bubbles under fondant; as the cake warms up, the air is released and causes the bubbles.

It sounds like you've done this a lot, so I'm assuming it hasn't given you trouble? Maybe it's the lard-based frosting that develops bubbles.

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:38pm
post #18 of 43

I get bubbles sometimes, everyone does occasionally. After smoothing out the fondant, I let it sit out for a bit and see if anything happens. If so, pop, smooth flat and you're good to go.

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:41pm
post #19 of 43

Also, if you allow your cake to settle down after filling before you ever ice it, that eliminates a lot of the chances for it to happen.

cocobean Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:41pm
post #20 of 43

Thnaks so much Kimmy, I'm really going to have to give it a try. Maybe I'll do it when a do a cake for a mauk (sp) wedding because I need to also drive around with a stacked cake using the sps system just to see how it works for me. I don't think I can take the pressure for a real wedding!

So much to try sooo little time! icon_sad.gif

imagenthatnj Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 4:45pm
post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocobean



So much to try sooo little time! icon_sad.gif




I hear you. I wish I could quit my job and just try the thousands of things that I've downloaded to my hard drives.

chrisviz Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 5:02pm
post #22 of 43

I love SMBC, so smooth!... I think it is easier than IMBC... I used it under fondant for the first time about 2 weeks ago, and I had the air bubbles that someone mentioned when putting fondant on a really cold cake.... it scared me at first (I was afraid it was going to happen and it did!) but I just took a pin and popped it so to speak and everything was fine.... I def prefer the "butter"creams over the crisco based... but then again, I dont mind those either icon_smile.gif

aswartzw Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 5:22pm
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpetty

Quote:
Originally Posted by KimmyKakes4Me

It stays exactly how it is when you are all done. When you're working with cold bc, the fondant gets locked into shape, and stays exactly that way.



So much advice can be confusing - I've read elsewhere that cold cake is one of the reasons for air bubbles under fondant; as the cake warms up, the air is released and causes the bubbles.

It sounds like you've done this a lot, so I'm assuming it hasn't given you trouble? Maybe it's the lard-based frosting that develops bubbles.




I get my worse bubbles when putting fondant on a cold cake. So much so that I switched to ganache. At first I thought ganache couldn't work well on every cake, but I used chocolate on red velvet and it was to die for and white chocolate on carrot and it was amazing. White chocolate really goes with anything.

Also, IMBC and SMBC are the same (except for the cooking method). Both handle the same way, both can be covered in fondant, used for decorations, etc. It's like two people getting from A to Z two different ones. No matter which cooking method you use you still get the same product.

Herekittykitty Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 6:00pm
post #24 of 43

I just used SMBC under fondant and it worked beautifully. Upside down method to fill and ice (I can't get sharp edges otherwise) chill, flip, then cover in MMF. Chill again then decorate. I can only do this in the cooler months however b/c I don't have A/C. SMBC is my fave - however my AMBC is good too since I don't use crisco, only butter - at worst 1/2 and 1/2 if the weather requires it.

cocobean Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 6:05pm
post #25 of 43

Hummm air bubbles on cold meringue bc. Do other people get that?

How bout do you ever have the problem of the cold bc making the fondant sweat when it starts to warm up? Just thought about that as a potential problem.

AngelFood4 Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 7:00pm
post #26 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocobean

Hummm air bubbles on cold meringue bc. Do other people get that?

How bout do you ever have the problem of the cold bc making the fondant sweat when it starts to warm up? Just thought about that as a potential problem.




I haven't had problems with air bubbles on cold cakes. Like KimmyKakes said, let the cake sit a while before covering it in the buttercream or SMBC/IMBC. Freshly baked cakes let out a lot of air while cooling and settling. Also, when covering it with fondant, you don't want to trap the air under it, smooth out the fondant starting over the top then gradually start on one side then work your way around it from the top of the side to the bottom pressing the fondant against the cake being sure to not trap any air - hope it makes sense but you don't want to randomly press the sides first.

And yes, as the cake comes back down to room temperature, it will sweat. Hasn't been a problem. I usually keep IMBC cakes refrigerated making them easier to decorate and transport cold. Once it comes back down to room temperature (3-4 hours), it looks totally fine....perfectly fine.

I did a Super Mario cake recently with Oreo IMBC and MMF over it. The oreo was crushed and I did a crumb coat with it then a final coat of plain IMBC over that so that the crumbs wouldn't show through the fondant (there's always a way).

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 7:11pm
post #27 of 43

I've diagnosed a lot of people's issues with meringues/fondant, and Angelfood nailed it right there. Random smoothing seems to be a BIG part of it. You lay the fondant on lightly, and don't do a dang thing other than get that top smooth first, work every bit of trapped air off of your top surface. Then, you go straight to the edges, and get those perfectly air free. THEN you start working down around the cake, in a spiral pattern.

Kind of like squeezing out the last bit of toothpaste. You don't squish it in the middle, then move to another area of the tube and jump around all random like.

chrisviz Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 7:28pm
post #28 of 43

I did a Super Mario cake recently with Oreo IMBC and MMF over it. The oreo was crushed and I did a crumb coat with it then a final coat of plain IMBC over that so that the crumbs wouldn't show through the fondant (there's always a way).[/quote]


Oreo IMBC???? I think I may have died and gone to heaven hearing that icon_smile.gif

chrisviz Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 7:30pm
post #29 of 43

Thanks KimmyKakes.... I will personally try to be more precise when I smooth my fondant next time and see what happens... and I guess another question to you all would be if you are going to use the SMBC or IMBC and you recommend rechilling after it has been fondant covered... will there be a difference in chilling the fondant if it is MMF or say Satin Ice?

AngelFood4 Posted 28 Sep 2010 , 7:31pm
post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisviz

Oreo IMBC???? I think I may have died and gone to heaven hearing that icon_smile.gif




It is heavenly delicious!!! icon_biggrin.gif Everyone loves it!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%