Baking Multiple Cakes, How To Store Them?

Decorating By Andreasmommy Updated 24 Sep 2010 , 5:11pm by Andreasmommy

Andreasmommy Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 7:32pm
post #1 of 13

Hi Everyone,
Well, I just started doing cakes a couple months ago and absolutely love it!

I was recently asked to participate in a holiday craft fair to earn some extra money for the holiday's by making my cakes! Well, I decided to make mini-fondant cakes decorated for the different holidays!

My question is how should I go about baking these multiple cakes and them not being weeks old when I need them? The fair is on a Saturday so I was hoping to make about 15 to 20 cakes, but I don't want to bake too early because by that day they would be a week old and no one wants to eat a week old cake. (I know I wouldn't want too..lol)

I know I can make all my little decorations a week ahead of time (with gumpaste or fondant) and they will be dry enough to just place on the cakes a day or two before but I'm lost on how to bake that many and keep them fresh..

Any suggestions would be great! icon_biggrin.gif

12 replies
hollyml Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 7:52pm
post #2 of 13

Freeze them. You can make them a week ahead with no problem and they will stay moist. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap; you can freeze them as unfrosted layers, or tort and fill first if you're going to do that. Let them thaw before you put the fondant on, ideally the day before the fair.

srkmilklady Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 8:16pm
post #3 of 13

I've tried freezing cakes ahead of time and when I thaw them the top comes out "gummy". Any suggestions of what I'm doing wrong? I have some cakes that I need to bake ahead of time in a couple of weeks and I'm confused about what to do because of the "gummy" problem I have. Any ideas? icon_redface.gif

janieltilda Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 8:27pm
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by srkmilklady

I've tried freezing cakes ahead of time and when I thaw them the top comes out "gummy". Any suggestions of what I'm doing wrong? I have some cakes that I need to bake ahead of time in a couple of weeks and I'm confused about what to do because of the "gummy" problem I have. Any ideas? icon_redface.gif




When you freeze them, do you level them first? I've experienced this "gumminess" you mention, but only when I wrap cakes without leveling them. I've found if I take off the top layer of the cake to make them level, and then wrap them, that they unwrap perfectly.

srkmilklady Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 8:31pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by janieltilda

Quote:
Originally Posted by srkmilklady

I've tried freezing cakes ahead of time and when I thaw them the top comes out "gummy". Any suggestions of what I'm doing wrong? I have some cakes that I need to bake ahead of time in a couple of weeks and I'm confused about what to do because of the "gummy" problem I have. Any ideas? icon_redface.gif



When you freeze them, do you level them first? I've experienced this "gumminess" you mention, but only when I wrap cakes without leveling them. I've found if I take off the top layer of the cake to make them level, and then wrap them, that they unwrap perfectly.


Well now, that makes sense! Why I didn't think of that, I don't know. Thanks, will give it a try! icon_smile.gif

jerseygirlNga Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 9:01pm
post #6 of 13

I have baked and frozen cakes, as taught here by many bakers. This week, I unwrapped, filled and covered a cake that has been in the freezer for 7 weeks. Not a trace of freezer burn...no gumminess...my biggest critic had NOT a clue!

srkmilklady Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 9:07pm
post #7 of 13

So, just to clarify...wrap the cakes with "plastic wrap" and also foil before freezing?

hollyml Posted 23 Sep 2010 , 8:24pm
post #8 of 13

I'd use plastic first and then foil if storing for a longer period of time, but have used just the plastic wrap (usually two layers) with no problem when it's only going to be in there for a day or two. I think the top tier of my wedding cake got wrapped in plastic, then foil, then more plastic, then more foil -- and it was still good a year later. icon_smile.gif

Sometimes I put a layer of parchment paper on top before wrapping in plastic, and then if there is a bit of a soft crust to the top of the cake, which is what gets "gummy," it doesn't stick to the plastic when unwrapped. This is useful when the cake is going to be carved, rather than just levelled, so you don't want to bother with cutting off the top "crust" beforehand, but also don't want it to peel off in a jagged mess after the cake is frozen. icon_smile.gif

mcdonald Posted 23 Sep 2010 , 8:37pm
post #9 of 13

I used to wrap in syran and foil but the foil always messed my nice even cake layer up so I stopped using foil... I have had no problems or complaints on my cakes...

srkmilklady Posted 23 Sep 2010 , 9:11pm
post #10 of 13

It will probably be for less than a week, so I guess I'll just go with the plastic wrap...why waste the foil! Thanks for the advice! thumbs_up.gif

Andreasmommy Posted 23 Sep 2010 , 9:58pm
post #11 of 13

Thank you all soo much for all the ideas! I'll definitely freeze them a week before the fair! icon_smile.gif

srkmilklady Posted 23 Sep 2010 , 10:25pm
post #12 of 13

Good luck with the Holiday craft fair Andreasmommy and thanks for your original post . Sorry for jumping in, but I had problems with freezing cakes and just decided not to do it anymore. But I've learned something here too...thanks to your post! icon_smile.gif

Andreasmommy Posted 24 Sep 2010 , 5:11pm
post #13 of 13

Thank you! It should be challenging and fun at the same time...lol icon_wink.gif

Don't apologize for jumping in, I'm glad you were able to get your questions answered too! Good luck with the freezing!

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