Leveling A Cake

Decorating By peggy1672 Updated 22 Sep 2010 , 10:45pm by carmijok

peggy1672 Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 2:38am
post #1 of 15

there has got to be a better way of torting and leveling a cake besides the Wilton way. my layers are never level. HELP

14 replies
catlharper Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 3:26am
post #2 of 15

the best way is the Agbay leveler. Costs a mint but worth every penny.

Cat

SugarKissesCakery Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 3:47am
post #3 of 15

I agree on the Agbay. It is perfection. The Wilton leveler always made my cakes crooked.

indydebi Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 3:48pm
post #4 of 15

Remove your cakes from the pan. Place 1 to 3 cardboard circles in the pan. Put the cake back in the pan. The cardboards have created a "platform" that now raises your cake above the top of the pan. Use a long knife and using the top edge of the pan as a guide, level the cake.

A perfectly (and I mean PERFECTLY!) level cake every single time.

The only bad part is sometimes its hard to get the cardboard out of the pan. Someone suggested putting saran in the pan first, before putting the cardboards in, to be able to just pull them out, so you might give that a try, too.

MommaDukes Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 3:51pm
post #5 of 15

I tried the way IndyDebi said and it works awesome. I always have a problem with leveling too. I have been known to but a little of the cake under one side like a shin. icon_redface.gif to bring up one side when I cut too much off one side.

leah_s Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 3:57pm
post #6 of 15

Start saving your birthday, holiday and cake money for the Agbay. It's the best!!

Karen337 Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 9:27pm
post #7 of 15

Wow, IndyDebi, thanks for that.

catlharper Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 10:13pm
post #8 of 15

leveling I don't have a problem with since I bake my cakes so they come up over the top of the pan and just level them with the pan but torting is another subject...saving my pennies for my Agbay! LOL! (which btw, am I the only one who thinks the name sounds like pig latin? LOL)

Cat

jerseygirlNga Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 10:41pm
post #9 of 15

I stopped torting and shallow bake BUT I do weigh the amount of batter going into each pan. It does take a little longer overall, but its worth not getting so frustrated with trying to level.

Now, here is a big but (and we are not talking about my body parts) Indy...Never thought of your method. Maybe I need to go back to torting using your method. Cakes going in the oven tonight...I am going to give it a shot!

carmijok Posted 21 Sep 2010 , 10:56pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Remove your cakes from the pan. Place 1 to 3 cardboard circles in the pan. Put the cake back in the pan. The cardboards have created a "platform" that now raises your cake above the top of the pan. Use a long knife and using the top edge of the pan as a guide, level the cake.

A perfectly (and I mean PERFECTLY!) level cake every single time.

The only bad part is sometimes its hard to get the cardboard out of the pan. Someone suggested putting saran in the pan first, before putting the cardboards in, to be able to just pull them out, so you might give that a try, too.




this may be somewhat off topic but I've been looking for LONG knife (llike ones we used at the bakery) and I can't find any! I mean the really long knives. I've tried an internet search but the only knives I see are like 12" and that includes the handle so the blade isn't really 12". Any suggestions?

indydebi Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 1:14am
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

this may be somewhat off topic but I've been looking for LONG knife (llike ones we used at the bakery) and I can't find any! I mean the really long knives. I've tried an internet search but the only knives I see are like 12" and that includes the handle so the blade isn't really 12". Any suggestions?


You might try any restaurant supply store and look at their meat carving knives.

I'm fortunate that I have a niece who manages a national chain cafeteria and when their meat carving knives go too dull to carve the beef and turkey, she gave me one or two. they were still plenty sharp enough to cut cake. And the blade alone is 14-15" long.

Scarlets-Cakes Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 1:41am
post #12 of 15

Thank you, indydebi, for ALL of your info. You have provided me with some VERY useful information, as I'm a self-taught amateur. Keep the good info coming! icon_biggrin.gif

chikadodle Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 2:09am
post #13 of 15

Lamson, Dexter and Ateco all make cake knives. As indydebi mentioned, the best place is definitely a restaurant supply store, but you can do a search for "cake knife" on google or amazon and find them. Practice makes perfect with levelling and torting. Good luck!

peggy1672 Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 4:05am
post #14 of 15

thanks everyone for taking the time to answer. Indydebi. I REALLY like your suggestion. thanks again.

carmijok Posted 22 Sep 2010 , 10:45pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by chikadodle

Lamson, Dexter and Ateco all make cake knives. As indydebi mentioned, the best place is definitely a restaurant supply store, but you can do a search for "cake knife" on google or amazon and find them. Practice makes perfect with levelling and torting. Good luck!




Thanks to you and indydeby...I did a search and found some. I was putting in the wrong info...I was using 'bread knife' instead of 'cake knife' for the search--duh. Of course a lot of wedding cake servers came up but I found several really long serrated knives...just what I've been looking for! yippee!! thumbs_up.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%