What do you use for cake boards?

Decorating By carebearlove Updated 11 Nov 2013 , 5:49pm by anavillatoro1

Jamielc Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 12:01am
post #31 of 75

I've been using foamcore boards a lot lately. I get them at the craft store mostly ... Michaels often has the standard 20x30" sheets on sale. I've also seen them at Dollar Tree, but they're a bit thinner and not quite as strong as the ones at the craft store sheets. As for plywood, I've yet to use it.

-K8memphis Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 12:13am
post #32 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by tokazodo

I'm a frugal chick, CHEAP, CHEAP, CHEAP!

I hit the area stores for clean cardboard. Something that hasn't sat on a floor or contained anything nasty like flea spray!(I like paper towel boxes!)
It's Eco friendly! HTH





I did this forever but now I just buy foam board & stuff. But I can't hardly go past a nice cardboard box that my heart doesn't skip a beat.

sharlanet Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 3:26am
post #33 of 75

I'm just a hobby baker and have never sold a cake so I definitely wouldn't use this on a cake I was selling, but I got some inexpensive frames from IKEA. They're sturdy, silver frame, plastic front. I print out something that matches the cake or use wrapping paper or scrapbook paper to put under the plastic. I just wash it off when the cake is gone. Like I said, it's not the most professional looking but it works great for family & friends! I was looking for something easy, sturdy, cheap and re-usable. (If you look in my photos, I used this for the Red Sox cakes and the Oreo cake)

iamcakin Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 7:51am
post #34 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharlanet

I'm just a hobby baker and have never sold a cake so I definitely wouldn't use this on a cake I was selling, but I got some inexpensive frames from IKEA. They're sturdy, silver frame, plastic front. I print out something that matches the cake or use wrapping paper or scrapbook paper to put under the plastic. I just wash it off when the cake is gone. Like I said, it's not the most professional looking but it works great for family & friends! I was looking for something easy, sturdy, cheap and re-usable. (If you look in my photos, I used this for the Red Sox cakes and the Oreo cake)




What a clever idea!! LOVE the choice of "filler paper" you used, especially on your Oreo cake! thumbs_up.gif

michel30014 Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 3:57pm
post #35 of 75

I have used the aluminum foil covered boards many a time up until I became a member here on CC. I am discovering a whole new world with cake boards. I have never used plywood or wood of any sort, however, that would be nice. My budget won't allow for it right now.

I use either gift wrapping paper or the plastic $1 tablecloths from the dollar store and cover with laminate. I bought a roll of laminate at Walmart for $5 and it has last me for a long time. I not only use the laminate on my cake boards but also use it to laminate pictures to go the cakes in some instances. See my photos for examples. Check out the Rock Star Cake or the Tokio Hotel cake. Prime examples. So, it's worth it for me to use the laminate!

Good luck and HTH!

sccandwbfan Posted 1 Nov 2010 , 5:27pm
post #36 of 75

I am kind of new to cakes and I usually use a drum (Kind of expensive) or at least 2 circles covered in fancy foil or something like that. I bought a masonite board at the cake supply store in my area, it was cheaper than a drum and reusable. It's thin. I put a really heavy cake on it and it was hard to get my fingers under so the next time I use it I will put feet on it. I've used wooden doll pin bases for feet before. They are not cost effective though.

Reading this thread, I've written down some great ideas: table cloths and foam core at the dollar store. Thanks to whoever posted those ideas.

lesgateaux Posted 2 Nov 2010 , 1:07am
post #37 of 75

i use at least 3 cake circles duct taped together and then covered in MMF (since it is so cheap to make). I use piping gel to stick the fondant on the boards (and again to stick the cake on). i hot glue ribbon that matches the cake around the edge of the board. they always look nice and match well.
i am interested in using plywood for heavier cakes however... i'll try that soon icon_smile.gif

ashleyj Posted 12 Feb 2012 , 2:45am
post #38 of 75

If you cover the cake board w/fondant, do you ever have a problem with it tearing?
Also, what is contact paper and where do you buy it?

ajwonka Posted 12 Feb 2012 , 10:05pm
post #39 of 75

I, too, buy 3/16" foam core at Michael's. It's regularly $3.99/sheet but often it's 50% off so I stock up (we're talking buying 25 sheets!). I cut it with a sheetrock circle cutter like this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Walboard-Tool-08-001-AC31-Drywall/dp/B000FK1UKO

A once-over with sand paper & it's ready to cover.

I roll fondant as thin as possible (to save money!), brush a bit of corn syrup or piping gel on the board, and roll the fondant onto it. Trim with a sharp knife and edge with satin ribbon (also from Michael's when 40% off!). I add the price of the board, fondant, and ribbon into the price of the cake.

For tiered cakes, I use spray adhesive to attach two foam core circles together for strength.

TheCakeIsNotALie Posted 13 Feb 2012 , 12:33am
post #40 of 75

The last cake i made was heavy and I didn't have time to get my dad to cut a plywood board for me. I actually purchased a large cutting board and it worked out great! I flipped it over so the smooth side was on top and the ridged edge was on the bottom. That provided a good grip and a strong surface for a heavy sheet cake.

Welsh4life Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 12:13pm
post #41 of 75

ALove the idea of plywood and contact paper! I used it and it looks real good and doesn't get get the paper greasy like wrapping paper did. Thanks

MUDDY828 Posted 31 Jan 2013 , 6:47pm
post #42 of 75

this is how I did mine plywood covered with fabric, cakeboard and food grade plastic on the bottom portion.

 

 

MARILYN CHILTON Posted 13 Feb 2013 , 7:29pm
post #43 of 75

ACK products and Party Cakes n Things both sell Masonite cake boards on line in all sizes. Polyfoil is food-approved for covering. Cardboard is too flexible and plywood is too heavy in thicknesses to be sturdy on anything over a quarter sheet cake or tiered.

BCBakey Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 2:04pm
post #44 of 75

I haven't done any huge cakes (largest I've done is in my avatar) but I've only used the pretty silver scalloped cake circles that I bought at Wal-Mart made by Wilton. For the cake in my avatar I used 2 of them for more stablization. Other than that, for the small cakes these work great and are fairly cheap.

Vista Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 3:17pm
post #45 of 75

I am in the plywood club.  I have used all kinds of things to cover the board with.  One of my most recent was an Alice and Wonderland cake that I covered the board with a deck of cards scattered about.  I covered the cards with clear contact paper.  I always put a cake circle under my cakes and glue that to the big cake board. 

 

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 9:06pm
post #46 of 75

For those that use plywood and masonite and particle board, how do you get the foil or table cloth, paper, contact paper, whatever  to stay on? I tried with many hard items like that, and tape won't stick, and contact paper peels up, and staples won't go in. I love the cardboard for the ease of stapling. 

Vista Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 11:30pm
post #47 of 75

I use contact paper, press firmly and then let it sit. I think the adhesive takes a little while to fully stick.  I have never had any problems.  In fact, I still have 2 sitting in my cake closet with the contact paper still on them, one is from Oct, the other is from July.

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 11:40pm
post #48 of 75

Hmmm.... Do you clean it with anything first? I just have never had any luck!

cgordy Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 12:17am
post #49 of 75

Simple: Thick poster boards from the Dollar Tree, cut them into the desired size using a ruler and exacto knife then cover in aluminum foil and tape on the bottom side.

Vista Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 2:43am
post #50 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

Hmmm.... Do you clean it with anything first? I just have never had any luck!


The board?  Nope.  Just make sure the ply wood is dust free.  When I am first applying the contact paper it acts like it doesn't want to stick, but after I get it all in place I just walk away.  When I come back it is always fine.

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 3:08am
post #51 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vista 


The board?  Nope.  Just make sure the ply wood is dust free.  When I am first applying the contact paper it acts like it doesn't want to stick, but after I get it all in place I just walk away.  When I come back it is always fine.

Hmmm, I'll try again! I have a 7 tier in a couple months, and I would like to use MDF, or something. I think I will "dust" it with 90% alcohol, then let it set for a bit to dry, then try. Literally every time, it just peels back, I have even used name brand duct tape, and had it slowly come off (not very professional icon_redface.gif ) The only way I have been able to combat it is to put a stack of 2 or 3 cake boards under the wooden board, to have something to staple into. (But you know I am not charging enough when I mourn the loss of the extra $2 it takes to do that!)

AZCouture Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 3:10am
post #52 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

Hmmm, I'll try again! I have a 7 tier in a couple months, and I would like to use MDF, or something. I think I will "dust" it with 90% alcohol, then let it set for a bit to dry, then try. Literally every time, it just peels back, I have even used name brand duct tape, and had it slowly come off (not very professional icon_redface.gif ) The only way I have been able to combat it is to put a stack of 2 or 3 cake boards under the wooden board, to have something to staple into. (But you know I am not charging enough when I mourn the loss of the extra $2 it takes to do that!)

Oh he&* yeah! Have fun! Try butcher tape. I would cover in fondant, but if you're set on using something else, butcher paper tape usually grips right into wood. Heck, just flood it with royal icing.

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 6:51pm
post #53 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Oh he&* yeah! Have fun! Try butcher tape. I would cover in fondant, but if you're set on using something else, butcher paper tape usually grips right into wood. Heck, just flood it with royal icing.

I LOVE the looks of a fondant covered board, but a lot of my cakes are priced too low (and I have no one to blame but myself, for my generous heart, ;-) ) Or are covered with buttercream. I do use the fanci- foil, on the main board, in a vast array of colors (i have about 20 different colors) but I keep the cake on a small board so it doesn't soak up the color of the foil :-P I think it looks nice enough for a birthday cake that is only $100, but with fondant wedding cakes, I cover the board in fondant. 

 

I will look into butcher tape.

 

And I covered a 3 board thick drum with royal, for a dummy cake....Ummm... it is now a flaky mess! lol

milkmaid42 Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 9:19pm
post #54 of 75

                                                                                                                         

I generally use foam core for my cakes. While I generally cover them with fondant and ribbon trim, I do find it fun to find other means of covering to keep with the theme. My all time favorite was made for an autumn leaf themed cake. I used spray adhesive on the board and covered it with gold tissue paper. On that I arranged leaves from my yard, dried with a microwave leaf press. When covered with Press 'n' Seal it became a food safe board that, frankly, I hated to cover with a cake. Here is a picture, and yes, the colors are all natural!

 

This Autumn's leaves were spectacular! I made the cake board from those collected from my yard and dried in a microwave flower press. I covered a foam core board with metallic gold tissue paper and fixed the leaves down with spray adhesive and food safe Press 'n' Seal. There are no artificial colors used. I hated to cover them up with the cake! Oh well. I matched the colors of the gum paste leaves to the actual leaves. No one would believe the colors if I didn't have the side by side comparison.

AZCouture Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 9:30pm
post #55 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

I LOVE the looks of a fondant covered board, but a lot of my cakes are priced too low (and I have no one to blame but myself, for my generous heart,

Tsk tsk...generous heart don't pay the bills! :D Just kidding...well, no not really. BUT, that's not what we're talking about either, so I'll leave you alone. You know, you can use very very little fondant if you roll it very thin, and cut out almost all of it that will be covered by the bottom tier. Save scraps in a baggie too, for future use, in the freezer. No one eats that part. 

Btrcrm4me Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 9:40pm
post #56 of 75

Love some of the ideas on covering the boards - I have just been covering carboard cake boards with foil...definitely going to have to try a few of the ideas posted here.  Thanks!

Annabakescakes Posted 16 Feb 2013 , 6:46pm
post #57 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmaid42 

                                                                                                                         

I generally use foam core for my cakes. While I generally cover them with fondant and ribbon trim, I do find it fun to find other means of covering to keep with the theme. My all time favorite was made for an autumn leaf themed cake. I used spray adhesive on the board and covered it with gold tissue paper. On that I arranged leaves from my yard, dried with a microwave leaf press. When covered with Press 'n' Seal it became a food safe board that, frankly, I hated to cover with a cake. Here is a picture, and yes, the colors are all natural!

 

This Autumn's leaves were spectacular! I made the cake board from those collected from my yard and dried in a microwave flower press. I covered a foam core board with metallic gold tissue paper and fixed the leaves down with spray adhesive and food safe Press 'n' Seal. There are no artificial colors used. I hated to cover them up with the cake! Oh well. I matched the colors of the gum paste leaves to the actual leaves. No one would believe the colors if I didn't have the side by side comparison.

That is GORGEOUS! Is press and seal bumpy? I thought it was? Could you have used clear contact paper? Would that have made it a little smoother, or is it just the lighting? I love this look! I am a fan of autumn leaves, I drive around and take pictures of them, like a tourist ;-) I will bring them in the house, too!

Annabakescakes Posted 16 Feb 2013 , 6:51pm
post #58 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Tsk tsk...generous heart don't pay the bills! :D Just kidding...well, no not really. BUT, that's not what we're talking about either, so I'll leave you alone. You know, you can use very very little fondant if you roll it very thin, and cut out almost all of it that will be covered by the bottom tier. Save scraps in a baggie too, for future use, in the freezer. No one eats that part. 

I KNOW! It really doesn't, lol! I am getting better, I quoted a cake way higher than I would normally, because I didn't want to do it, and the lady was thrilled with the price, and I don't mind doing it anymore ;-D

 

When I did my cake dummies for the bridal shows, I covered in fondant, then took the entire part off that was to be covered by another tier, except for about an eighth an of an inch, since I didn't want it to sit recessed.  It saved a TON of fondant, since I had 18 little 3 tier minis.

milkmaid42 Posted 17 Feb 2013 , 1:44am
post #59 of 75

Anna, I was in such a hurry to get the cake made, (I had spent a LOT of time on making matching gumpaste leaves), that I didn't even think of clear contact paper. Yes, that would have been better for,as you can see, I did have one stretch wrinkle going across the face. As for the leaves, this was Missouri's most spectacular fall in years. We really thought the season would be a color bust, since the summer drought was so severe. I collected and dried hundreds and even bought more plastic bins to store them in, all sorted to colors and shapes. With a dessicant package in each, they should be available for any future project.

As for bringing them indoors, you really struck a chord with me there. I grew up with a mother who appreciated nature and beauty. Every fall she would collect leaves and carefully pin them to the living room curtains. It is a little something I hope I have passed on down to my kids...

I'm posting a picture of the cake with the leaves I made. I was really happy with the way they turned out, even though the dusting took literally hours... Sorry, I didn't mean to hijack the thread.  Close up of gum paste leaves. I used real leaves from my yard which I pressed and put on the cake board. I tried to match the gorgeous colors they had this fall.

 

Another aspect of benefit cake to show different leaves.

Annabakescakes Posted 17 Feb 2013 , 2:08am
post #60 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmaid42 

Anna, I was in such a hurry to get the cake made, (I had spent a LOT of time on making matching gumpaste leaves), that I didn't even think of clear contact paper. Yes, that would have been better for,as you can see, I did have one stretch wrinkle going across the face. As for the leaves, this was Missouri's most spectacular fall in years. We really thought the season would be a color bust, since the summer drought was so severe. I collected and dried hundreds and even bought more plastic bins to store them in, all sorted to colors and shapes. With a dessicant package in each, they should be available for any future project.

As for bringing them indoors, you really struck a chord with me there. I grew up with a mother who appreciated nature and beauty. Every fall she would collect leaves and carefully pin them to the living room curtains. It is a little something I hope I have passed on down to my kids...

I'm posting a picture of the cake with the leaves I made. I was really happy with the way they turned out, even though the dusting took literally hours... Sorry, I didn't mean to hijack the thread.  Close up of gum paste leaves. I used real leaves from my yard which I pressed and put on the cake board. I tried to match the gorgeous colors they had this fall.

 

Another aspect of benefit cake to show different leaves.

You lucky dog! lol My mom hated it when I brought leaves and rocks and frogs and such in the house. She would say we where "going to get mites" lol Consequently, I allow my kids to do it. When we got some gravel brought in our yard for drainage, my 3 older kids and I sat in the rocks and examined them for hours ;-) There room is filled with the prettiest ones we found, and I am always picking them out of the washer. (Then examining them, and putting them on the shelf, lol)

 

And the leaves are exquisite! Did you use a real leaf for the veins? It looks like it! They are seriously brilliant.

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