Nicole211 Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 6:46pm
post #1 of

I "heard" about this Buttercream recipe made from a cooked flour and milk base- and that it was AMAZING- so I went in search of! I was originally told it was a "French Buttercream"- but when I searched for that, it was NOT a flour/milk recipe. But I DID find the recipe- and whipped it up! It IS amazing- soooo smooth and silky, not overly sweet, but not "overly" buttery, like the MBC's. My question is... has anyone out there tried this recipe (see below)? If so, how do YOU keep it from getting little "solid" pieces in it? I tried running it through the food processor after cooking it- before cooling- it seems to work ok- but I'm thinking there has to be a better way??!! Also, has anyone made it in chocolate before? If so, what did you add to make it chocolate?
Recipe:
4 T flour
1 cup milk
*cook together till it forms a smoothe "paste"- (I run it through the food processor at this point). Cool completely
Whip together:
1 cup sugar
1 cup butter
1 t vanilla
Then add in flour/milk mixture and beat on med-high to high for 20-25 minutes. It will look "ruined" for quite a while and then will turn perfect!

Thoughts?? Suggestions?? Thanks in advance!!

31 replies
imagenthatnj Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 7:01pm
post #2 of

I would ask if you stirred, stirred, stirred constantly so that you don't get any lumps. I would do that with a wooden spoon. It's what you usually do when you do similar things like when you're making a roux (butter with flour) so that's silky and smooth.

Anyway, here are two other recipes of a similar thing. At the very least you might get tips on how they cook it, even if it's a different recipe.

http://obsessedwithbaking.blogspot.com/2009/02/flour-frosting.html

http://obsessedwithbaking.blogspot.com/2009/04/flour-frosting-v2-and-hersheys.html

cakedout Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 7:08pm
post #3 of

This is the recipe I have used for many years. I call it a 'French Buttercream' although it may not be an accurate description...but I use it to differentiate it from other bakers using "Italian Meringue" frostings.

In my experience, I have found that the butter must be room temp- but not mushy-soft! If the butter is cold, it will be lumpy. If the butter is too warm, it will not set up. icon_sad.gif

I have never put it thru a food processor. Never thought about trying that! Anyway- I just continuously stirred the milk/flour mixture! Also, after cooking, I spread it out onto a plate to cool, then covered lightly with plastic wrap so it wouldn't get hard, crusty edges.

I remember trying to make it chocolate with diseasterous results- and adding peanut butter didn't work either! icon_sad.gif

Because this is a soft frosting, I had to be careful not to use really heavy side decorations on my wedding cakes because they would slide off! I often used this icing for borders, but decorated using the traditional 10x sugar & shortening buttercream.

This frosting is what set me apart from other bakeries! icon_smile.gif

manahigh Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 7:10pm
post #4 of

I make this icing whenever I want something light and creamy, not too sweet and don't have to worry about the heat and humidity. I use a whisk to mix the milk and sifted flour together before heating and then constantly while cooking. I also stir it often while it is cooling and I never have had a problem with lumps. Hope that helps.

kayjess Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 7:25pm
post #5 of

This is the frosting my Mother used for years...some even compare it to "whipped cream" icing.. as you said no so sweet. However, I use 1 c. shortening instead of 1 c. butter.

However, it is so soft a consistancy, I can never use it for anything more than to ice a cake.. can't decorate with it at all. Have you guys been able to decorate with this icing?

Nicole211 Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 9:21pm
post #6 of

The last time I made it, I actually made sure it was "lump free" even before heating then stirred it with a whisk the whole time it was cooking. The problem isn't "lumps"- it's little tiny pieces of solid- and not a LOT- but enough to notice. They are just little flecks- almost like when people have trouble with the egg white in lemon curd?

cakedout- yes, this definitely separates me from the "others"- and I almost can't go back to regular buttercream icon_wink.gif What did you use for the "chocolate"? I was wondering if you could use cocoa powder mixed in with the sugar/butter, like you would for regular buttercream? Maybe not?

kayjess- I've been using it for icing and decorating without any trouble

cakeandpartygirl Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 9:31pm
post #7 of

I love this buttercream also because it is light and more sweet than meringue based but not overly sweet!!! I don't have any problems with the lumps in it but I just put a layer of plastic wrap right on top of it to keep it from getting a skin. I think that they say to do the same thing with curds. HTH

imagenthatnj Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 9:35pm
post #8 of

Tried this already?

http://www.ourbestbites.com/2010/05/chocolate-frosting.html

beenie51 Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 9:43pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

Tried this already?

http://www.ourbestbites.com/2010/05/chocolate-frosting.html


I checked out the chocolate recipe and it sounds wonderful. I have done the cooked flower and milk recipe for years. I do like the flavor of the all butter, but to give the recipe a little more holding power in warmer weather I have uses 1/2 butter and 1/2 crisco. I have made the all crisco version and it seemed to taste to greasy for me.

Nicole211 Posted 20 Sep 2010 , 10:23pm

Thanks for all the recipe links- I think I need to go make some frosting!!

TheSweetTreat Posted 12 Mar 2012 , 4:40pm

I made this frosting for the first time yesterday and made it twice. The first time I had lumps as well from the milk/flour mixture. There were absolutely NO lumps while I was constantly stirring it in the saucepan. It was only after the mixture cooled and then whipped that the mixture didn't completely get smooth. The first time, I didn't whip the flour/milk mixture before incorporating it into the butter/sugar mixture. I figured that was the problem. The second time I made it I whipped up the flour/milk AFTER it had cooled and it helped just a bit to eliminate lumps, but they were still there. I had to push that mixture through a mesh strainer to try and get rid of the rest. I still didn't completely get rid of the lumps. I think my actual problem is that I let the flour/milk mixture get TOO cool. Next time I will continue to check the temperature and once it's not warm anymore I'll move forward with making the icing. Both times yesterday I just left it sitting on the counter indefinitely and came back to it when I could.

TheSweetTreat Posted 12 Mar 2012 , 6:42pm

I made this frosting for the first time yesterday and made it twice. The first time I had lumps as well from the milk/flour mixture. There were absolutely NO lumps while I was constantly stirring it in the saucepan. It was only after the mixture cooled and then whipped that the mixture didn't completely get smooth. The first time, I didn't whip the flour/milk mixture before incorporating it into the butter/sugar mixture. I figured that was the problem. The second time I made it I whipped up the flour/milk AFTER it had cooled and it helped just a bit to eliminate lumps, but they were still there. I had to push that mixture through a mesh strainer to try and get rid of the rest. I still didn't completely get rid of the lumps. I think my actual problem is that I let the flour/milk mixture get TOO cool. Next time I will continue to check the temperature and once it's not warm anymore I'll move forward with making the icing. Both times yesterday I just left it sitting on the counter indefinitely and came back to it when I could.

BakingIrene Posted 17 May 2012 , 11:32pm

I make this all the time.

It's called German or Belgian buttercream if you use egg yolks with the flour and milk.

First of all I use 1+1/4 cup butter with 1 cup milk.

Second I use cornstarch instead of flour. It will be stiff but straining it softens it up better than flour.

I push the pudding through a fine strainer just before I add it to the butter/sugar.

Spooky_789 Posted 23 May 2012 , 8:08pm

I've made both recipes that the Our Best Bites blog has posted, the vanilla and the chocolate. Both are very good. I like using the vanilla frosting on my red velvet cakes and cupcakes, rather than cream cheese frosting.

For each, after cooking the paste, I do run it through a mesh sieve to get out any lumps, then I place a sheet of plastic wrap directly on top of the paste so that it doesn't form a skin. I stick it in the fridge to cool completely.

For her chocolate recipe, I use a total of 1/3 cup of cocoa, which is perfect for my tastes. Not too dark, not too light.

When whipping up the chocolate batch (using the paddle, not the whisk attachment), I have learned from experiences to shut off the stand mixer prior to adding the cooled melted chocolate. Slowly incorporate about 1/3 of the melted chocolate at a time, being careful not to let the cooled chocolate hit the sides of the bowl, where it will firm up, leaving little bits of chocolate in your frosting. While tasty, it may not be the look you're going for.

I've used both butter and HRS in this recipe and do like the butter better.

I think the chocolate recipe in her blog is the best for this kind of frosting as I've tried making it other ways and just do not have any luck with it coming out in a nice cohesive frosting.

debbief Posted 23 May 2012 , 9:41pm

I found this recipe here on cc several months ago and use if for filling in all of my cakes now. (I use ganache to ice them and then cover with fondant.)

When I found this recipe ...can't remember from who...these are the tips that came with it. Works great for me.

Increase the sugar to 1 1/4 cups, and grind it down in a blender until it's powdery - this will remove the grainy texture (I use bakers sugar)

When adding the flour to the milk, make sure you whisk CONSTANTLY, and when it says to wait until the roux thickens, that means you must wait until it becomes nearly solid. It should hold its form for several seconds without melting into itself again.

Instead of waiting for this to cool on its own, put this mixture into a stand mixer while it's hot and beat with the paddle attachment until it cools to room temperature, this prevents lumps.

At this point, add the softened butter gradually until it's uniformly mixed, and then gradually add the finely ground sugar and vanilla extract

Switch to the whisk attachment and mix at the highest speed for nearly 10 minutes, the frosting should be pure white (it will take a while) and fluffy at this point and ready to spread. Trust me, the effort is well worth it on the frosting.


I love the the texture and taste of this frosting. Sometimes to make it a little stiffer, I add a little powder sugar.

imagenthatnj Posted 23 May 2012 , 9:56pm

For a moment, I thought that the OP was looking for the French Vanilla Buttercream (not French Buttercream) that is in Toba Garrett's book. They look similar but are different? I don't know. Here's the thread about Toba's buttercream. I have her book, but haven't tried this one. Maybe this was what you originally were looking for.

http://www.sweetcelebrations.us/files/french_vanilla_buttercream_a_la_toba.pdf

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-19577.html

mclaren Posted 24 May 2012 , 12:36am

To those who have been using this BC regularly, may I know what is its shelf life in room temp? Thanks in advance!

dandymom Posted 24 May 2012 , 5:37pm

I found that putting both the flour and the milk in the food processor for a minute BEFORE cooking really helps to combine it well. Then, while cooking, whisk constantly and then once you take it off the stove keep whisking until smooth, then cover with plastic wrap, right on top of the mixture so skin doesn't form. I cool mine on the counter to room temp.

dandymom Posted 24 May 2012 , 5:40pm

Also, I've left this out at room temp for 2 days on it was just fine.

yortma Posted 24 May 2012 , 6:09pm

A trick I learned somewhere for getting flour and milk mixed without lumps is to add a small amont of milk to the flour and mix into a smooth paste with no lumps. Gradually add the remaining milk while continuing to stir, and the mixture should be smooth from the start.

mclaren Posted 25 May 2012 , 7:09am
Quote:
Originally Posted by dandymom

Also, I've left this out at room temp for 2 days on it was just fine.




Thanks dandynom!

leeyn Posted 25 May 2012 , 9:26am

I just continuously stirred the milk/flour mixture! Also, after cooking, I spread it out onto a plate to cool, then covered lightly with plastic wrap so it wouldn't get hard, crusty edges. ,......

cakeladyatLA Posted 25 May 2012 , 10:36am

I'd love to try it

yortma Posted 26 May 2012 , 12:01am

After reading all the praises of this type of frosting, I had to give it a try. I am so glad I did! My all time favorite frosting is RLB's silk meringue buttercream which has a custard base and is wonderful. It is a little more time consuming to make, and the final product is very ivory in color, but is my go to recipe. You can add just about anything to it, and it makes the best chocolate frosting. Needless to say, I was skeptical about trying anything else, but I was surprised! I tried Toba Garret's recipe and it was delicious. It is lighter in flavor than the silk meringue buttercream but also has that custard flavor without being too sweet or buttery. (I made it with all butter). It smoothes and pipes beautifully. Also, it has no eggs if that is an issue, and is a much lighter more versatile ivory color. I took it to work and it sat out for about 3 hours before it was gone, and the frosting held up beautifully. It didnt get soft or slumpy at all. Everyone really liked it. I used it as the filling as well, and it cut cleanly and didnt squeeze out the sides. I will be seeing what can be added to it for variety.

To avoid lumps, I heated the milk and sugar in a large glass measuring cup in the microwave until just boiling (watch carefully, boils over easily). Then I poured 2 to 3 Tbsp of the hot milk into the flour and mixed until a very smooth paste. Then I added a few tablespoons more of the hot milk, mixing until completely smooth. Then I mixed the flour into the rest of the milk. I placed the measuring cup in an ice bath and stirred occasionally until cooled. I poured it through a strainer into the mixing bowl, although there were virtually no lumps. Then I completed the buttercream as directed.

It came out beautifully smooth, with no lumps and no food processor! The photo is a quick 5 minute frosting job - just a few times over with the scraper and a quick piping, so I could get out the door and off to work with it (my colleagues are eager to help me dispose of my experiments)! This recipe definitely goes in my file, and maybe the initial mixing technique will help with the lump issues!
LL

SPODN Posted 2 Jun 2012 , 6:37pm

I've used this recipe for years, it was my mother's recipe she just called it flour icing. I have had many of the issues othere mention and the only way I found that the only way to get a smooth icing without those little lumps is to mix the flour mixture constantly while it cools. I can remember my father watching baseball and mixing the flour mixture for my mom while she beat the the other ingredients. I've made it with butter, I've made it with crisco, I've made it with a mixture of both but the secret it beating that flour mixture to death while it cools.

Carmen500 Posted 24 Jul 2012 , 11:08pm

cakedout,my mom use chocolate milk for the chocolate version and its very good.

Dustbunny729 Posted 9 Aug 2012 , 8:42pm

Does the iced cake need to be refrigerated? I'd like to use it on a cake that has to be prepared the day before the event and it won't fit in the refrigerator.

mly625 Posted 18 Oct 2013 , 6:02pm

I just made this frosting today for the first time for a red velvet cake!  Haven't put it on the cake, but OMG!!!!  This frosting is delicious!  NO LUMPS!  

I read several reviews from where I got the recipe and here is what I did....it is smooth & creamy:

 

1.  put milk (1 cup) in sauce pan

2. sift 3 tbls. of flour 1st then slowly add to milk whisky constantly

3.  continue to whisk constantly for about 8 min. or so (really don't leave it)

4. remove from heat (place on cool countertop or something similar)

5. every few minutes, whisk it vigorously to smooth out until it is cool...not cold

6.  while it is cooling whip your sugar, butter, vanilla high speed for 6-8 minutes...this will make the mixture creamy

7. then add the milk/flour mixture and continue to whip high speed for 4-6 minutes.

 

Good Luck!

ari1965 Posted 29 Oct 2013 , 9:37am

ACan I freeze flour icing, I make a lot of cakes and Dont want to be making this everyday. Help..

anavillatoro1 Posted 30 Oct 2013 , 1:13am

ASounds good , I have to make it

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