Upside Down Method Work For Bc Like It Does For Gananche?

Decorating By debbief Updated 15 Sep 2010 , 9:36pm by Herekittykitty

debbief Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 5:47pm
post #1 of 27

Ive started using ganache under fondant a lot lately and I love how much easier it is to get those nice sharp edges. I especially like the technique of turning the cake upside down to get the top nice and flat and the edge really sharp. Just wondering, can I do this with bc? I wont be covering the cake in fondant, Im going to use crusting bc and the viva towel method. I hope that makes sense.

26 replies
leah_s Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 5:49pm
post #2 of 27

The first time I ever heard of this technique, it was with bc.

debbief Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 5:52pm
post #3 of 27

Oh yay! Thank you leah_s icon_biggrin.gif

diane706 Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 6:47pm
post #4 of 27

Actually, I've never heard of the upside down method using ganache, only bc.

bakencake Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 7:09pm
post #5 of 27

can you explain the upside down method? btw, when working with bc here is a great tip, just learned it yesterday. once you are finished with the viva towel do the same thing but with a computer paper. It makes a really smooth surface and if you know what you are doing, I still dont, you will get nice sharp corners.

debbief Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 7:26pm
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakencake

can you explain the upside down method? btw, when working with bc here is a great tip, just learned it yesterday. once you are finished with the viva towel do the same thing but with a computer paper. It makes a really smooth surface and if you know what you are doing, I still dont, you will get nice sharp corners.




Here's a link to a great tutorial.

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

bakencake Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 7:31pm
post #7 of 27

thank you!!

sweettreat101 Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 7:51pm
post #8 of 27

. To begin with, there are some tools I consider "must have" items:
A Turntable
A Spackling Knife [from a hardware store]
2. Trace the outline of the pan [top side down] onto a sturdy surface, such as a piece of foamcore, cardboard, or for a more permanent use, masonite.
3. Cover the outline with a piece of parchment paper about 1 to 2 inches larger than the pan's outline and tape securely so that there are not wrinkles. Some people have had success using acetate instead of parchment.
4. Using a very smooth icing, "ice" the area of the circle, extending the icing about 1/4" past the outline; any extra icing will be removed later. Apply the icing about 1/4" thick.

Place the "iced" board in the refrigerator and allow to chill until firm, about 10 to 15 minutes. If using an all shortening icing, you may need to place the board in the freezer instead.
5. Once chilled, remove the board from the refrigerator and place the "top" cake layer top down on the iced circle, centering is in place. Fill and add aditional layers. Here I have used only 2 layers, but normally I would have torted the layers into four.
6. Lightly crumb ice the sides of the cake and chill a few minutes if desired before applying the final coat of frosting. Apply the final coat of frosting to the desired thickness using a spatula or large icing tube.
7. Place the cake on the turntable. Dip the spackling knife in hot water and dry with a paper towel. Hold the blade against the side of the cake at about a 45 degree angle and reach the other hand around the back until it is near the hand holding the knife.
BE SURE THE SPAKLING KNIFE IS TOUCHING THE PARCHEMENT or else there will be a line of icing pushed out beneath it.
8. SLOWLY turn the turntable one full rotation WITHOUT STOPPING. Inspect the side so the cake. If it is not smooth to your satisfaction, repeat step #7 again. If a small amount of icing has pushed under the blade, simply scrape it away before repeating step #7.
Smooth any icing build up over onto the "bottom" of the cake with a small angled spatula. When the side are smooth to your satisfaction, carefully cut the parchment paper loose from the board ALL THE WAY AROUND THE CAKE using an Exacto Knife. Carefully return the cake to the fridge for about 10 to 15 minutes to firm the icing [all shortening icing may need to be put in the freezer].
9. Prepare the final cake board by smearing a few strokes of icing on it. Remove the cake from the fridge, center the board and quickly "FLIP" the cake over. REMOVE the cardboard, but leave the parchment in place and return to the fridge for about 10 minutes.
10. Carefully remove the parchment..you should have a beautifully iced cake with perfect edges and a very level top.

All4Show Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 8:16pm
post #9 of 27

I hadn't heard about using it with ganache either, but love using this method with my BC. It really improved the look of my cakes. So much more polished.

debbief Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 8:30pm
post #10 of 27

sweettreat101, is there a reason you ice a covered board, chill and place the cake on that, rather than just ice the top of the cake, place covered board on top and turn upside down?

Just seems like a lot of extra steps to get the same results. Maybe it's different for bc?

imagenthatnj Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 8:36pm
post #11 of 27

In case you wanted to know, the owner of that blog, who does it with ganache is our own ANGELFOOD4 in Cake Central.

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

This is that ganached cake, after fondant:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1537867

Herekittykitty Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 8:40pm
post #12 of 27

You chill the bc before putting the top layer down so it doesn't sink or squish when youre building the cake (top, fill, next layer, fill, next layer, etc...) and gives you a nice even layer on top. I suppose it isn't absolutely necessary but I always do it.

I have done this with both, was skeptical about it working for ganache but it was great on both. The only time I can get sharp edges.

debbief Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 8:57pm
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herekittykitty

You chill the bc before putting the top layer down so it doesn't sink or squish when youre building the cake (top, fill, next layer, fill, next layer, etc...) and gives you a nice even layer on top. I suppose it isn't absolutely necessary but I always do it.

I have done this with both, was skeptical about it working for ganache but it was great on both. The only time I can get sharp edges.




That makes sense. Maybe I didn't have that problem with ganache because it is stiffer/sturdier than bc. In any case, I think I'll try it the same way with buttercream and see how it goes. I can always re-do it pretty easily if it sinks too much. It just seems like it would take so much longer to do it that way. I would also build the entire tier before turning it over. That way it will go directly into the freezer after filpping to firm up.

Herekittykitty Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 9:05pm
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by debbief

[I would also build the entire tier before turning it over. That way it will go directly into the freezer after filpping to firm up.





Haven't tried that because I am a-skeer'd. I'd drop it, just know I would. The final flip always gives me the heebies.

debbief Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 9:09pm
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herekittykitty

Quote:
Originally Posted by debbief

[I would also build the entire tier before turning it over. That way it will go directly into the freezer after filpping to firm up.




Haven't tried that because I am a-skeer'd. I'd drop it, just know I would. The final flip always gives me the heebies.




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Well I haven't dropped it yet. Let's just hope I didn't jinx myself.

AngelFood4 Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 4:19am
post #16 of 27

Thanks debbief and imagenthatnj for linking to my blog.

I use the upside down method with BC, Ganache and IMBC...so far. It works like a charm, the tops are always leveled and the edges always sharp.

I've never had a problem with it sinking or squishing and yes, it is a bit scary flipping the cake back over, just hold you breath and go for it thumbs_up.gif

Erin3085 Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 11:21am
post #17 of 27

Is there a tutorial anywhere for doing this with buttercream, or does it work exactly the same as the ganache? I would love to try that, but I'm too scared to do it without step-by-step directions! icon_biggrin.gif

imagenthatnj Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 11:51am
post #19 of 27

Thanks, Angela. I thought it wouldn't work with IMBC, but if you tell me it works, I'll try that one day. It's the only buttercream I make.

pag41989 Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 12:34pm
post #20 of 27

Will the upside down BC method give crisp edges when covered in fondant or just the ganache?

cab333 Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 12:50pm
post #21 of 27
Quote:




That tutorial, and the entire blog is superb! Thanks for sharing! icon_smile.gif

debbief Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 2:06pm
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelFood4

Thanks debbief and imagenthatnj for linking to my blog.

I use the upside down method with BC, Ganache and IMBC...so far. It works like a charm, the tops are always leveled and the edges always sharp.

I've never had a problem with it sinking or squishing and yes, it is a bit scary flipping the cake back over, just hold you breath and go for it thumbs_up.gif




No, Thank you Angela for the awsome tutorial. It's very easy to follow and the pictures help tremendously.

I'm excited to try this with bc this weekend. icon_biggrin.gif

AngelFood4 Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 2:23pm
post #23 of 27

Imagenethatnj - with IMBC, I like to work with cold cake layers when assembling (in the fridge a few hours or in the freezer for an hour before covering it) it helps it harden faster and assembly easier. I even do an IMBC dam, pipe it around the cake, pop in the fridge to harden, fill, add another layer, etc. There's a Hello Kitty and 80th Music Notes cake both covered only in IMBC in my album.

pag41989 - Crisp edges are the sharpest with ganache. Even with crusting BC and a very cold cake, the edges round slightly with the fondant over it. I have a Super Mario and Barney cake in my album done recently with BC under the fondant if you would like to see what the edges look like.

cab333 - Thank you!

Erin3085 Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 2:29pm
post #24 of 27
Quote:




You may have just made my week/weekend with this. Thank you so much! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

imagenthatnj Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 2:37pm
post #25 of 27

AngelFood4, I can't believe that 80s Music Notes cake is covered in IMBC! You give me hope and inspiration. I never thought you could bring IMBC to that level of smoothness and with such straight edges. I had dragged that cake to my folder just to look at it; it's so clean. I guess I forgot to read the intro about it. Thanks again!

AngelFood4 Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 3:04pm
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

AngelFood4, I can't believe that 80s Music Notes cake is covered in IMBC! You give me hope and inspiration. I never thought you could bring IMBC to that level of smoothness and with such straight edges. I had dragged that cake to my folder just to look at it; it's so clean. I guess I forgot to read the intro about it. Thanks again!




Huge Tip with IMBC - be sure to keep the cake cold when you work with it. It's so easy to put a ding on the cake once it starts coming back down to room temperature. There are lots of trips to the fridge with the cake while decorating it - LAL!

Herekittykitty Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 9:36pm
post #27 of 27

Angelfood. Ok, now I want a Thundercats cake. Cheetara was my favorite; well she and Snarff.

*Snarff!*

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