License To Rent A Commercial Kitchen?

Business By tigerfly28 Updated 4 Oct 2010 , 11:40am by LoveMeSomeCake615

tigerfly28 Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 5:10pm
post #1 of 16

I have a call into the WI food safety inspector for my area, but I'm sure she won't be getting back to me very quickly.

I'm going to be renting a commercial kitchen of someone I know who owns a catering business for my cake biz. Do I need my own licensing and/or permits? I am starting this is no clue where to go or how to get there, so any insight would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

15 replies
jason_kraft Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 5:25pm
post #2 of 16

In most areas, you will need to get a business license from your town/city, and you will need to be inspected separately by the county or state in the commercial kitchen in order to get an inspection certificate.

You will also want to make sure you have liability insurance, and I recommend looking into forming an LLC to protect your personal assets.

tigerfly28 Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 5:53pm
post #3 of 16

I have already formed an LLC, so that's a start! icon_smile.gif I need to get some insurance, so I'll have to look around and see who to call. Any recommendations? ... I was hoping I'd be covered under the kitchen's license that I'll be renting. Boo....

jason_kraft Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 5:59pm
post #4 of 16

Most major insurance companies can either offer business liability coverage or refer you to someone who does. I have a policy with Wells Fargo insurance (underwritten by Hartford), others here use State Farm. Premiums are typically in the $200-500 range per year.

imagenthatnj Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 6:08pm
post #5 of 16

I would think that you would be able to bypass the inspections because the commercial kitchen would already be inspected regularly.

Maybe you can read through ads/requirements, etc. in this blog and see if you can find something useful.

http://commercialkitchenrental.wordpress.com/

I read in one of the posts that "Each renter will need to supply references and have liability insurance (or tag onto ours)" so perhaps you can have that option too with the kitchen you're renting.

jason_kraft Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 6:13pm
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

I would think that you would be able to bypass the inspections because the commercial kitchen would already be inspected regularly.



Health department inspections are meant to inspect both the facility and the business using the facility...for example, each business using the facility has to have food safety certification, and each business has to store their ingredients in a sanitary manner.

step0nmi Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 6:17pm
post #7 of 16

in WI you do have to get inspected with the commercial you will be renting in order to get the license.

what area of WI are you from?

MamawJ Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 8:07pm
post #8 of 16

Anybody have any idea how renting space from a restaurant or kitchen works with getting licensed in florida? I have a friend with a restaurant that I can use, but not sure what trauma this could cause him with the state and I still need my own business license.

I just want to be able to advertise without selling a couple of the kids for the money to get set up!!!! icon_surprised.gif

adonisthegreek1 Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 8:17pm
post #9 of 16

In most areas you do not need a separate license from the health department if you are working from a kitchen that is already licensed. If it was not licensed then you'd need to get your own license. You, however, cannot use their insurance. Your LLC needs to get it's own.

MamawJ Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 8:19pm
post #10 of 16

Awesome. I just have this funny, sinking feeling that the State of Florida will want as much moeny as they can and make the process as difficult as possible!!!!!! I should just move..............LOL

I guess I can try to get a human being at the Dept of Agriculture to find out! Thanks.

gingerbreadtogo Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 9:21pm
post #11 of 16

Good Luck...sounds like a great opportunity..I would've loved something like that to pop up in my previous search for a kitchen. Like you said..try to get a human being so you can do it all correctly..I'm in CA so I don't have any legit help to offer you..

Hope it all works out for you.

Rachel5370 Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 9:46pm
post #12 of 16

Here in Colorado, it's required to get a seperate license. It's the same exact application, the same fee and the same process as if I were having my own kitchen inspected for the first time. It tends to be a little less involved if it's a kitchen that is licensed, because you can duplicate much of the info from the original application. The application here, and probably many other places as well, includes details about the facility like the rate of water flow from every faucet in the place, a floor plan drawn to scale and all kinds of other little details. The owner will have done all of that already. You will have to submit a menu, maybe some of your recipes and a plan for proper heating and cooling of potentially hazardous foods. You will have to show them where you are storing all of your products. If another renter or the main tenants have any violations, it will have to be corrected in order for you to get your license. I am getting my inspection soon, and have noticed that some of the other renters sometimes leave 50# bags of flour or sugar sitting on the floor. That's a big no-no, everything needs to be elevated at least 4" off the floor. Sharing a space with others can be challenging. Especially when someone claims all of the upper shelves in the reach in cooler, stores dairy and eggs there, and I have to move their stuff in order to put my finished cake in there. (Meats, eggs and dairy cannot be stored above produce or ready to eat/finished products) Sorry, that last part was a mini-rant.

MamawJ Posted 3 Oct 2010 , 10:02pm
post #13 of 16

There's so much to think of!! At my house, I just make sure the kitchen is clean, the kid stays out of the way and do my thing!! Haven't had a single customer drop off a chair yet!!!!!! LOL

Oh, well, by the time I'm done, I'll be able to join the circus as a professional hoop jumper!

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 4 Oct 2010 , 1:43am
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamawJ

Awesome. I just have this funny, sinking feeling that the State of Florida will want as much moeny as they can and make the process as difficult as possible!!!!!! I should just move..............LOL

I guess I can try to get a human being at the Dept of Agriculture to find out! Thanks.




You're right about that! FL is very strict and particular about food business! You do need your own separate license and inspection by the Dept. of Agriculture. Once you are an LLC and have registered for federal taxes and state taxes, you would need to set up an inspection in your friend's kitchen, even though it's already inspected for his business. Go here- http://www.business.gov/states/florida/start.html
It gives step by step instructions. HTH!

Edited to add: It really shouldn't be a big deal or too much of an inconvenience for your friend, unless his kitchen is not up to code!

MamawJ Posted 4 Oct 2010 , 2:49am
post #15 of 16

That's a huge help! Thanks for the info and the link. I'm sure his kitchen will pass with flying colors.....it better, my son is the kitchen manager! icon_smile.gif

I'm curious about one thing, though. Since you obviously have experience with Florida........would I be required to do the baking and all the decorating both in the restaurant? Or is it acceptable to the baking and assembling in the restaurant and work on the accessories (flowers, etc) elsewhere? Just curious about what the state expects. Thanks again!

I'm just trying to figure out how much time I would have to spend there instead of being able to do some work at home......some of my best work is done in my jammies!! icon_biggrin.gif

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 4 Oct 2010 , 11:40am
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamawJ

......some of my best work is done in my jammies!! icon_biggrin.gif




LOL! I know what you mean!

But yes, you have to do everything in the licensed kitchen. We were told that you can't even take the finished product home or bring any ingredients from home. Everything has to move from business to business, or from business to the client's home or wherever they are having the party if you are delivering it to them.

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