Satin Ice Cracking ??

Decorating By cakeastic Updated 16 Sep 2010 , 12:50pm by cakeastic

cakeastic Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 12:02pm
post #1 of 16

I've used SI fondant to cover my cake (shaped like a car) but when i was rolling it, it seemed to crack and ofcourse once i placed it on my cake, it had cracks all over, especially on the corners ?? icon_sad.gif
It wasent too thick too. Im starting to hate SI from this problem now.
What do you think was the problem?

15 replies
Eisskween Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 12:26pm
post #2 of 16

Sometimes that happens with store bought fondant. You could try one of two things.

Warm the fondant in the microwave a few seconds at a time, till it becomes soft and pliable and the consistency you like to work with; or knead in some crisco to alleviate the dryness. Your corner problem, take a bit of crisco and rub it into the corners when you lay the fondant on. This will moisten it so it will prevent the corner cracks.

BlakesCakes Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 7:23pm
post #3 of 16

Did you knead in some shortening? Did you knead it until it was smooth? Did you roll it on a drying agent, like CS, or on a smear of shortening--like SI recommends?

Rae

cakeastic Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 8:15pm
post #4 of 16

I did knead in some shortening and roll it on shortening. It was soft and pliable but it wasent very elastic to roll out without cracking. But i dont know why icon_confused.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 8:24pm
post #5 of 16

Gosh, well, you got me....

I use SI all of the time, especially the dark colors. I just got a new shipment and used almost 5lbs. of the red right away. It took me awhile to get it smooth. Out of the bucket it had lots of small craters in it, but once it got warmed up, it was fine.

I've contacted Satin Fine Foods before and they've been very responsive. Make sure you give them the lot number when you communicate with them.

Phone: (845) 469-1034
Fax: (845) 469-8345

U.S. Mail:
Satin Fine Foods, Inc.
37 Elkay Drive, Suite 41
Chester, NY 10918

[email protected]

Rae

sweetnessx3 Posted 13 Sep 2010 , 1:35am
post #6 of 16

I love SI but, one time did that when I had used to much color gel , I was trying to get a deep red and the last amount of color gel I put in caused it to break down and crack ! Were you coloring your SI ?

Shannon1129 Posted 13 Sep 2010 , 6:05pm
post #7 of 16

My last few tubs of SI have not been up to par either. My last 20 bucket of white was miserable to work with.

cakeastic Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 12:59pm
post #8 of 16

Yes Yes! I was colouring it! But i dont remember i added alot of colour, i just wanted a green colour (not too deep).
So i think that explains that SI doesnt hold colours? icon_confused.gif

bethasd Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 1:14pm
post #9 of 16

I think SI could have better elasticity too but I haven't tried anything other than Wilton (blech). Does anyone have experience with other brands?

Also, I noticed that the cracking is worse when I add blue food coloring for some reason.

wilgon1 Posted 16 Sep 2010 , 1:50am
post #10 of 16

I made a cake with satin ice and let it set that same day I place a figure in the center of the cake and it cracked from one side to the other. What could have happned.

sweetnessx3 Posted 16 Sep 2010 , 3:06am
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilgon1

I made a cake with and let it set that same day I place a figure in the center of the cake and it cracked from one side to the other. What could have happned.




Maybe it was to heavy icon_sad.gif If its a heavy figure you should have some support under it . I really dont know .....

BlakesCakes Posted 16 Sep 2010 , 3:16am
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetnessx3

Quote:
Originally Posted by wilgon1

I made a cake with and let it set that same day I place a figure in the center of the cake and it cracked from one side to the other. What could have happned.



Maybe it was to heavy icon_sad.gif If its a heavy figure you should have some support under it . I really dont know .....





Absolutely!

I put a straw or dowel under any figure that weighs over a few ounces.

If the cake is moist and the surface of the fondant has dried before putting the figure on it, the weight of the figure will act like a finger pushing on a focused spot on the fondant--that will certainly cause a crack as the the figure slowly sinks into it.

HTH
Rae

wilgon1 Posted 16 Sep 2010 , 12:22pm
post #13 of 16

The fondant was dry I place the fondant in the morning and started the work with the cake again in the evening after I can from work. The figure was tinkerbell which is a bet small you can see it in my photos, I placed it in the center of the cake after the cake had set.

If the cake is already dry do I have to carve a hole so I doesnt crake the cake when I put the figure?

tracycakes Posted 16 Sep 2010 , 12:35pm
post #14 of 16

The ONLY time I have been able to cover a cake with SI have not get elephant skin or cracks was to roll it out on a vinyl mat smeared with shortening, and it was a pain! I got tired of SI and switch to Fondarific, which I use exclusively except for flowers and fondant decorations I want to dry ahead. Fondarific tastes great and not one time have I ever had it crack on me, even rolling it super thin. When my customers tell me they don't like the taste of fondant, I give them a taste and they change their mind. Also, I get my cakes covered lickety-split and no cracking, ever.

bethasd Posted 16 Sep 2010 , 12:48pm
post #15 of 16

Thanks for the Fondarific review tracycakes. I'll have to give it a try.

cakeastic Posted 16 Sep 2010 , 12:50pm
post #16 of 16

I think ill try using Fondarifics fondant but stick with SI gumpaste icon_smile.gif

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