Is This Ok For Stacking A 3-Tier Cake?

Decorating By divadane Updated 11 Sep 2010 , 11:35pm by cakesbycathy

divadane Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:09am
post #1 of 17

so i have a 14-inch masonite board for the bottom 12-inch tier. i then plan to stick in the dowels and place the next layer (10in) on a 10-inch cardboard round, and to top it off with an 8inch cake on an 8inch cardboard round.

i've never done a tiered cake before, so PLEASE correct me if i'm making any major support mistakes that won't present themselves until the time of delivery.......?

i also don't plan on assembling the cakes until i arrive at the restaurant. we have about a 2hr ride, so i intend to place each layer in a box (without a top) that will keep them as snug as possible. then, i thought i'd just bring some "glue" and stack the cakes at the time of the party.

advice??

16 replies
CWR41 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:21am
post #2 of 17

Don't forget to dowel your 10".

divadane Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:24am
post #3 of 17

right - definitely. just forgot to mention it icon_smile.gif

cab333 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:31am
post #4 of 17

I hope you dont mind me asking...but do you build the tiers with the cardboard rounds or without them? My limited experience is only with two tiers, and I don't normally use the cardboard. Am I constructing my cakes wrong?

divadane Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:33am
post #5 of 17

i don't really understand your question, cab333............... i always thought i'd HAVE to stack with the cardboard. that way, if the dowels from the layer below pop up, they're hitting cardboard and not cake...........

...right?

i'm a true novice!!

Karen421 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:49am
post #6 of 17

Yes - you must have cardboard or foam core or some type of support for the cake above, so the straws or dowels can support the upper layer. HTH

icer101 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:51am
post #7 of 17

hi, each tier has to have a cake board under it. Tiers are 2 layers(sometimes 3). you dowel the bottom tier , then put the next tier with a cake board under it on top of the first tier,etc. hth

beenie51 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:51am
post #8 of 17

Make sure to cover your cardboard circles so that the frosting does not soften the cardboard. That can also cause the cake to be unstable. Had that happen once many years ago. May not be much of an issue since your are not assembling the cake till you get to the resturant. icon_smile.gif

Karen421 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:52am
post #9 of 17
catlharper Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 1:23am
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by beenie51

Make sure to cover your cardboard circles so that the frosting does not soften the cardboard. That can also cause the cake to be unstable. Had that happen once many years ago. May not be much of an issue since your are not assembling the cake till you get to the resturant. icon_smile.gif




Never ever, in over 20 years, have I covered the cakeboard circles. My frosting has set up and crusted and doesn't soak into the circles and they never get soft. Cake boards are made for food service so they don't need to be covered.

And, yes, if you picture your support system as sticks standing up and then a circle of cardboard and standing more sticks on top of that topped with another circle of cardboard you will begin to see how the cakes never truly sit on top of eachother...it's the cardboard circles sitting on the dowels below, not the cake below.


Cat

cab333 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 2:34am
post #11 of 17

Well thank goodness I was browsing the boards this here Friday night! Thanks guys, as always your guidance is really appreciated! icon_smile.gif

divadane Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 10:40am
post #12 of 17

okay, awesome. thanks for the tips re: cakeboards.
here's another question about that:
if i don't cover the cakeboards, how do i hide the ugly brown inside that peeks through the sides? fondant trim around edge or something?

Karen421 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:07pm
post #13 of 17

Yes - that would be work, I usually frost over and fondant over mine. Did you watch Edna's video? You can't see hers at all.

cab333 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:15pm
post #14 of 17

PS. Goodluck with your cake Divadane!! thumbs_up.gif

divadane Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:38pm
post #15 of 17

Yes I had seen
Edna's video once before... Just checking to be sure there weren't Amy unforeseen pitfalls!! icon_smile.gif
Thank you all so much!

catlharper Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 4:11pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by divadane

okay, awesome. thanks for the tips re: cakeboards.
here's another question about that:
if i don't cover the cakeboards, how do i hide the ugly brown inside that peeks through the sides? fondant trim around edge or something?




If it is the right side then nothing should be peaking thru the sides. If it's a bit too large then just trim it down with kitchen sheers. I usually trim mine down just about a quarter inch. If it is just exactly the size of your cake then just crumbcoat down to the board and cover it with BC that way. Tonedna has a great YouTube video that shows how to do that smoothly.

Cat

cakesbycathy Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 11:35pm
post #17 of 17

SKip the dowels altogether and use SPS.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%