But The Toothpick Came Out Clean!!!!

Baking By pooky1969 Updated 13 Sep 2010 , 9:42pm by pooky1969

pooky1969 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 12:57am
post #1 of 16

Ok I made and baked the cake according to the recipe and cooking time, the toothpick came out clean, the cake has cooled, I leveled the cake and when I tasted the scraps it was WAY too moist. Do you think it wasn't cooked long enough? I've never done this but can you put the cake back in the oven after it has cooled? Do you think that would help?

Any suggestions are welcome!
Thanks!

15 replies
BoLeggs79 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 1:03am
post #2 of 16

Did you use sour cream or buttermilk in your receipe?

pooky1969 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 1:05am
post #3 of 16

Nope, the recipe only had water, 2 Tb of oil and 3 egg whites for the wet ingredients.

hollyberry91 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 1:23am
post #4 of 16

Did it have the texture of a cooked cake just super moist? Or was the texture still kinda batter like?

pooky1969 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 1:27am
post #5 of 16

It definitely looks cooked, the toothpick came out totally clean, but when you taste it it just (for a lack of better words) mushes in your mouth.

metria Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 1:31am
post #6 of 16

correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't an under-cooked cake like ... more under-cooked in the center and not the edges? i'm trying to remember a while back where one of my cakes seemed under-cooked. after leveling it you could see the outer portions of the cake were a different color/density than the inner portion. did your cake look like that?

pooky1969 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 1:39am
post #7 of 16

I would think you are right, but the cake looks the same all the way through.

Has anyone ever put a cake back into the oven after they have leveled it? But, maybe this is just a super moist cake.

BoLeggs79 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 2:05am
post #8 of 16

No I think it is too late now, you might want to bake another one. I only put a cake back in once I check it and their stills seems to be a bit more moisture in the center. I have made a poundcake before and the toothpick came out clean, but when I cut it later, it was a mush texture - like the inside of a jellybean I tried to bake it some more - did not work. When the time is up (baking) there is not much more you can do but to scrap it. Turns out my oven temperature was not correct, I put a thermometer in and my cakes were actually cooking too fast, that seems like the problem you might have. Had to replace some parts in oven, now everything bakes like a charm.

gatorcake Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 2:33am
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by pooky1969

Ok I made and baked the cake according to the recipe and cooking time, the toothpick came out clean, the cake has cooled, I leveled the cake and when I tasted the scraps it was WAY too moist. Do you think it wasn't cooked long enough? I've never done this but can you put the cake back in the oven after it has cooled? Do you think that would help?

Any suggestions are welcome!
Thanks!




Seems like you are conflating moistness and moisture. The toothpick came out clean because the cake was done--it was cooked through. Moistness describes the sensation of something being liquid. Note the operative terms--senesation of something being liquid--that is not the same as moisture.

While the cake may have been too moist it would not mean it was not done---hence a clean toothpick. The problem is in the production in the batter--cooking it longer is simply likely to toughen up the sides--it will be overbaked as it is done. Want a less moist cake, you need to alter the batter and rbake. At least this is how I understand moistness.

pooky1969 Posted 10 Sep 2010 , 3:02am
post #10 of 16

Thank you everyone for your answers and suggestions. I appreciate it so much!

What would I do without this website!? icon_biggrin.gif

LindaF144a Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 2:19pm
post #11 of 16

Post your recipe. Possibly you just got a recipe that is working they way it is supposed to, but not what you are looking for.

I would be curious to see what it is.

JustGettinStarted Posted 13 Sep 2010 , 12:33am
post #12 of 16

Yeah I'm curious about the recipe too. I made a WASC cake and it is so moist I can't believe it! I keep thinking all of them I make are underbaked, but I believe they are perfectly baked...just super moist

Marianna46 Posted 13 Sep 2010 , 12:52am
post #13 of 16

It may just be that I live at sea level or in a particularly hot and humid climate, but I find that all my cakes need considerably more cooking time than the recipes call for. I use an in-oven thermometer, so I know it's not because the temperature is off. Some recipes are worse than others, although I haven't been able to attribute it to any one cause yet (never say die!). It's especially true of some commercial cake mixes that I use (mixes made mainly for bakeries, not your standard Duncan Hines-Betty Crocker ones), and even more so of the ones that are specially formulated for "tropical" climates. Oh, well, when they finally get done, they're delicious. I'd say definitely look into your oven temperature or just face up to the fact that the recipe is just super-moist, especially since you say that the consistency is constant all the way through. You might want to try experimenting with other recipes. Hope you can find out what the problem is. By the way, has anybody else tried it and told you it's awful? Maybe everybody would like it and then you wouldn't have to worry (unless you find it falls apart!).

pooky1969 Posted 13 Sep 2010 , 1:45am
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46

By the way, has anybody else tried it and told you it's awful? Maybe everybody would like it and then you wouldn't have to worry (unless you find it falls apart!).




I have made this before and had no complaints, I don't remember it being so moist though. I made it for my boss for her husbands birthday. She comes back to work tomorrow so I will find out what they thought of it.

Here is the recipe. I'm just starting out so I usually start with a boxed cake mix and then add to it to change it up a bit. This recipe I found on Allrecipes.com. It's called "Tiramisu Layer Cake".

CAKE:
1 (18.25 ounce) package moist white cake mix
1 teaspoon instant coffee powder (I added double)
1/4 cup coffee
1 tablespoon coffee flavored liqueur (I added double)

FILLING: (I doubled the filling...extra for decoration)
1 (8 ounce) container mascarpone cheese
1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
2 tablespoons coffee flavored liqueur

FROSTING:
2 cups heavy cream
1/4 cup confectioners' sugar
2 tablespoons coffee flavored liqueur

GARNISH:
2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1 (1 ounce) square semisweet chocolate

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour 3 (9 inch) pans.
Prepare the cake mix according to package directions. (Which had 1 1/3 C. water, 2 Tb of oil and 3 egg whites) and Divide two thirds of batter between 2 pans. Stir instant coffee into remaining batter; pour into remaining pan.
Bake in the preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely. In a measuring cup, combine brewed coffee and 1 tablespoon coffee liqueur; set aside.
To make the filling: In a small bowl, using an electric mixer set on low speed, combine mascarpone, 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar and 2 tablespoons coffee liqueur; beat just until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.
To make the frosting: In a medium bowl, using an electric mixer set on medium-high speed, beat the cream, 1/4 cup confectioners' sugar and 2 tablespoons coffee liqueur until stiff. Fold 1/2 cup of cream mixture into filling mixture.
To assemble the cake: Place one plain cake layer on a serving plate. Using a thin skewer, poke holes in cake, about 1 inch apart. Pour one third of reserved coffee mixture over cake, then spread with half of the filling mixture. Top with coffee-flavored cake layer; poke holes in cake. Pour another third of the coffee mixture over the second layer and spread with the remaining filling. Top with remaining cake layer; poke holes in cake. Pour remaining coffee mixture on top. Spread sides and top of cake with frosting. Place cocoa in a sieve and lightly dust top of cake. Garnish with chocolate curls. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes before serving.
To make the chocolate curls, use a vegetable peeler and run it down the edge of the chocolate bar.

I keep reading of people making the WASC cake...I can't wait to try that one day. What frosting tastes best with it?

Thanks! icon_smile.gif

LindaF144a Posted 13 Sep 2010 , 1:45pm
post #15 of 16

Sorry, can't help with doctored cake mixes. I either bake from scratch or use the box as it, but mostly, actually always I bake from scratch.

There are others on this site with experience with this kind of thing that can help better than I can.

pooky1969 Posted 13 Sep 2010 , 9:42pm
post #16 of 16

Thanks anyways!

I got rave reviews from my boss today anyways, she said it wasn't too moist. Her and her husband were very happy with it. I guess I just worry too much.

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