Survey The Bride - After Wedding

Business By CVB Updated 12 Sep 2010 , 4:38pm by WykdGud

CVB Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 3:00pm
post #1 of 24

Hi,

I am curious to those cake makers that create wedding cakes, do you contact your brides after the wedding to see how the cake was? I was thinking of creating a survey to send to all brides (after the wedding) for feedback.

Thanks!

23 replies
DefyGravity Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 3:20pm
post #2 of 24

I don't know that I would do that. Even after the wedding day is over, there is a honeymoon, then getting thank you notes out, catching up on whatever work they missed, and getting settled into their new life.

If I would have been sent a survey, I don't think I would have filled it out only because it would have been too low on my priority list.

If there is some incentive tied along with it, that might help.

etr2002 Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 3:35pm
post #3 of 24

When I got married, my baker told me that about a 3-4 weeks after the wedding, she was going to send me a questionnaire/survey with a prepaid envelope and asked if I would complete it. I knew the business was young and the baker was wanting constructive criticism as well as pats on the back. I knew it was coming and looked for it, so I wasn't surprised when I received it and filled it out promptly. If you are thinking about doing this, I would make sure to address it with the bride at a consultation and hopefully she will be more likely to cooperate.

gr8yf Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 3:37pm
post #4 of 24

Walk away from that idea. If they liked it and want to tell you let it be volutery. Big can of gummy worms just opened.

leepat Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 3:46pm
post #5 of 24

No news is good news, I always say.

hsmomma Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 4:37pm
post #6 of 24

I wouldn't do it either. They probably don't want to be bothered...many times they are moving and trying to settle in to new life.

Besides...when you get those awesome Thank you notes...you will know they came from the heart and not because you requested them to tell you how the cake was.

jenmat Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 5:19pm
post #7 of 24

when you ask for feedback right away, you are always opening yourself up to buyer's remorse. Many bills are coming due and the day may not have been all it was supposed to be, even if the cake was perfect.

Better scenario: When they drop off their items (supports, etc.) you can ask them how "everything went." If they rave, you can ask them to review you on your site, or on another wedding site.

WykdGud Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 5:33pm
post #8 of 24

Here is what I did - I had some postcards printed up by Vista Print that had a questionnaire asking for ratings of 1 to 5 on different aspects (taste, professionalism, overall quality, etc.) and a space for comments. I sent them out a few weeks after the wedding with a congratulatory card and an offer of a free anniversary tier if the postcard was completed and returned within 30 days.

Chasey Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 5:43pm
post #9 of 24

When I got married, I never thought twice about complimenting the "cake lady!" I just figured she was a professional and KNEW her cakes were good, ya know?

Rest assured you would hear about the cakes that were less than stellar!

If you are looking to hear DELISH! and that kind of comment, then you have a couple of great suggestions above.

If a couple is neutral, yet satisfied about their purchase then maybe you are looking for areas of improvement? If so, make sure to have a space for that on your survey/card. Have them be specific if you are really looking for a learning experience here and not just a pat on the back. icon_smile.gif

jsmith Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 5:55pm
post #10 of 24

I've called the venue before, the next day, to see how things went. That way I don't bother the bride and I can find out immediately rather than waiting to see if she ever contacts me again.

WykdGud Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 6:39pm
post #11 of 24

Something to think about: getting a review in writing right after the wedding protects you from a later claim that the cake was unacceptable and a request for a refund.

Ruth0209 Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 2:12am
post #12 of 24

I ask all my brides to complete a review on WeddingWire. I disagree with the notion that you open the door to buyer's remorse, etc. just by asking for a review. If you're going to hear a complaint, you're going to hear it whether you ask for a review or not.

I've never felt like I have anything to fear from reviews. If you get a bad one, you need to look honestly and critically at what they say and either dismiss it because it's without merit or accept the valid criticism and improve your business from it. If I'm doing something that's sub-standard I ABSOLUTELY want to hear about it. Burying your head in the sand doesn't help you. It just eventually puts you out of business.

I don't think that today's brides like paper surveys. Most are young people who are used to doing just about everything on-line. They're much more likely to respond that way than by filling out a paper form. Heck, I'm 55 and I don't even like doing anything by paper anymore.

loriemoms Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 3:23am
post #13 of 24

I usually hear from the brides on their first anniversary...they come to get their free anniversary cake and go on and on about how everyone is STILL talking about how good their cake was! I let them approach me (they also post on weddingwire as well, but I only put a link on my web site..I don't push for postings...I do know a local bakery offers a discount on a cake if they post a positive review!) I do agree, no news is good news.

indydebi Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 9:30am
post #14 of 24

1) no news is good news.
2) Solicited compliments mean nothing.

WykdGud Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:34pm
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

1) no news is good news.
2) Solicited compliments mean nothing.




I have to disagree here. Companies pay big money to find out how they are doing. How many times do we get receipts with surveys we are asked to fill out online or call and answer questions about the service? Why do focus groups exist? The best way for any business to know what they are doing wrong or right is to ask for feedback.

The "no news is good news" approach is essentially burying your head in the sand. How many times have you gotten crappy service, or part of your meal was missing when you went through the drive thru, but you just didn't want to deal with complaining about it? Instead, you just don't go back, right?

I would prefer to know what my customers think of the service I have provided to them so that I can better understand their needs and any areas I may need to improve on.

I guess the approach you should take regarding feedback depends on whether or not you want your business to grow.

aswartzw Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 12:45pm
post #16 of 24

I wouldn't. I know when I got married I was just happy to finally be done with the entire ordeal and start my new life. Writing TYs was tough enough to do while recovering from the wedding stresses.

If I'd had a vendor do a survey after the fact, I'd have been annoyed. I would have done it b/c I'm nice but I would have been annoyed and may not use you again.

I also get insanely annoyed when places I order from send me emails to do surveys. It might only take 30 seconds but it is still time from my busy day. If I don't like something, sure I'll complain or do a review just to let others know what I experienced but I'm with indydebi: no news is good news.

indydebi Posted 11 Sep 2010 , 7:40pm
post #17 of 24

I think there is a big diff between complaining about service thru a drive thru window and a problem with a $500 cake for a girl's wedding day. I have participatd in focus groups and professional (!) survey/opinion groups. I also find these MUCH different than the "Rate my professionalism on a scale of 1 to 5", which to me, tells a person absolutely nothing about their quality or service. (Define "professionalism" between 5 people and you get 6 answers).

If someone wants to pay a professional team big money to compose a legit survey and send to a bride, I'm all for it. If someone wants to make up 5 qustions on a postcard that don't really tell you anything ( as most of those kind don't), then don't irritate the client by bugging them in what can be construed as "I'm looking for a compliment."

My most valued compliments came unsolicited. I did ok making my biz grow from my first cake to a biz that had gross sales in the 6-figures annually by NOT sending out what I deem pesty surveys.

costumeczar Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 2:11am
post #18 of 24

I don't contact anyone, but I have to disagree that solicited complients mean nothing. They might mean less than unsolicited ones in terms of sincerity, but clients don't know that. There are loads of businesses who aren't so hot who ask their clients to write something nice about them then publicize the crap out of those comments. It's the stupid "fake it til you make it" philosophy (I just wrote about that little piece of dumbness on my blog last week).

You can get all the puff pieces you can written about your business, and clients don't know that you paid for the article placement or not. Loads of people build an entire business on the idea that if they talk a big game then people will hire them, even if they're just a small business. Problem is, they usually can't deliver and end up getting rolled by their own exaggerations. Okay, now I think I got slightly off-topic, but you get the point. solicited or unsolicited, a compliment on a review page is a compliment on a review page.

adonisthegreek1 Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 2:23am
post #19 of 24

No, I don't do it and wouldn't do it. I, too, feel like it can be opening a can of worms.

indydebi Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 3:44am
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I don't contact anyone, but I have to disagree that solicited complients mean nothing. They might mean less than unsolicited ones in terms of sincerity, but clients don't know that.


Yes, that is a much better explanation of it! thumbs_up.gif You said it much better than I did!

A small word of caution though. My sister in law works in marketing and while I can't recall the specifics, I do recall that she said any comments that were compensated for had to be noted that it was a compensated comment. Money, gift cards, free cake ... whatever. If they rec'd something in return for saying something nice, it had to be specifically stated that the comment was bought and paid for.

and somewhere in the back of my head she said something about solicited comments but I just can't recall what. If I think about it, I'll ask her next month when I see her at my son's wedding.

ladyonzlake Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 3:59am
post #21 of 24

When I first started I wanted to know how it went with all of my cakes and my husband wanted me to call and ask but I felt that you should be confident in your product and if you are you don't need to ask...your customers will let you know.

So no, I don't ask, I wait for them to respond and they usually do. I have a "testimonial" link on my website for brides or customers to place their comments.

I agree with others that say "No News" is good news.

costumeczar Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 2:14pm
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I don't contact anyone, but I have to disagree that solicited complients mean nothing. They might mean less than unsolicited ones in terms of sincerity, but clients don't know that.

Yes, that is a much better explanation of it! thumbs_up.gif You said it much better than I did!

A small word of caution though. My sister in law works in marketing and while I can't recall the specifics, I do recall that she said any comments that were compensated for had to be noted that it was a compensated comment. Money, gift cards, free cake ... whatever. If they rec'd something in return for saying something nice, it had to be specifically stated that the comment was bought and paid for.

and somewhere in the back of my head she said something about solicited comments but I just can't recall what. If I think about it, I'll ask her next month when I see her at my son's wedding.




You do have to have the disclosures if you are paid for any kind of positive reviews on blogs, so maybe that's what she's referring to. I don't think that you have to disclose anything if you ask someone to write a review without any kind of compensation. You never know, they could write a bad review.

loriemoms Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 3:49pm
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by WykdGud

Something to think about: getting a review in writing right after the wedding protects you from a later claim that the cake was unacceptable and a request for a refund.




I have in my contract that any issues with the cake must be brought to my attention 14 days following the wedding or we cannot be held liable after..
That should be more then enough time with any problems, including food illnesses, etc.

The only bride I ever had contact me after that was she asked for a refund on her cake topper since there was no cake topper on the cake...6 months later. I quietly sent her her invoice and gave her my apologies, but she never ordered a cake topper from me. Never heard from her again. I think she was trying to find money somewhere for all those bills...

WykdGud Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 4:38pm
post #24 of 24

I have to address the comments about "bothering" the bride. I don't see sending out a congratulatory card with a survey and offer of a free anniversary cake as being pushy. If she doesn't want to fill it out, she'll toss it in the trash. If she does, then I've gotten a little valuable insight into the way I'm running my business.

I find it ironic that some have no problem with "bothering" brides when payments are a little late, etc. but asking to make sure the bride was satisfied with your services is an issue? Puh-leeeeeeeeeeeze.

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