Use Of Heating Core Necessity

Decorating By mrsmac888 Updated 9 Sep 2010 , 8:53pm by sumerae

mrsmac888 Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 3:43pm
post #1 of 18

Hello All! I'm making a three tier cake next week 14, 12 and 8 inches. Do I absolutely need to use a heating core for the 14 and 12 inch cakes? I've heard of using the flower nail instead, but would that work for the 14 inch? Would it actually distribute the heat enough to make it worth it? Can I just lower my temperature and use the convection on my oven instead?

Thanks!
Christina

17 replies
walterak Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 6:40pm
post #2 of 18

I have not done a 14" yet, but for the 12" I don't use a core, and mine turn out great.

jmr531 Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 6:57pm
post #3 of 18

I use one or more flower nails for anything 10 inches or bigger.

sumerae Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 7:17pm
post #4 of 18

Excuse the newbie...but when you say flower nail...how do you use it in the cake when it bakes?? Just stick it in the batter in the pan?? Won't it fall over? (I use the wasc recipe)

dchockeyguy Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 7:17pm
post #5 of 18

I would use the flower nail technique for sure in the 14, and probably in the 12.

I'm curious about your sizes though. with 8, 12, and 14 your tiers aren't goign to be proportionally larger. I would think using a 10 top, or a 16 bottom, would look more "normal."

dchockeyguy Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 7:19pm
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sumerae

Excuse the newbie...but when you say flower nail...how do you use it in the cake when it bakes?? Just stick it in the batter in the pan?? Won't it fall over? (I use the wasc recipe)




No, mine tend to stay up. I just place it upside down in the pan and pour the batter in. I then remove it when baking is done.

sumerae Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 7:19pm
post #7 of 18

Excuse the newbie...but when you say flower nail...how do you use it in the cake when it bakes?? Just stick it in the batter in the pan?? Won't it fall over? (I use the wasc recipe)

jmr531 Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 7:21pm
post #8 of 18

Just as dchockeyguy said, just place it upside down in the center of the pan and pour the batter in. Make sure you grease and flour the nail before you put it in the pan. Then you can remove the nail once the cake is done and cooled off.

jmr531 Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 7:23pm
post #9 of 18

If you forget to put the nail in before pouring in the batter, it's ok. Just stick the greased/floured nail in upside down and make sure it sits at the bottom of the pan. It won't tip over. I've used it in the wasc recipe several times and it worked fine.

sweetpeasdelights Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 8:02pm
post #10 of 18

Just a quick tip that I have learned with the flower nail...I stick my through my parchment paper that is in my pans before I pour the cake batter...that way the nail part is exposed to heat the cake through but it is easy to remove when the cake is done because it is on the parchment paper.

juststarted Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 8:25pm
post #11 of 18

wow I like the nails to stick out of the parchment paper a lot thumbs_up.gif

leah_s Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 8:52pm
post #12 of 18

I don't use a heating core or a flower nail in any size cake. Just turn your oven temp down and you'll be fine. I tried the flower nail once because so many CCers talk about it and I thought it was just silly.

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 11:09pm
post #13 of 18

I use flower nails in nearly all of my cakes.

I find that with the nails, there is little to no hump, and in my life, they're easier to deal with than cake strips.

I put several nails in cakes over 10" round (only 1 in an 8" or 10"). In a 12", probably 3 nails. In a 14", 5 nails. In rectangular or square cakes, I line them up down the center of the cake (in a 12x18, I use 4-5 nails). I like not having to cut away any cake.

Rae

tmterlaan Posted 8 Sep 2010 , 11:30pm
post #14 of 18

I just made a 16", 14" and 10" cake for my daughters wedding. I used flower nails in all 3 of these sizes. It is so much easier to do and it doesn't create the dome on the cake. I don't know if you need more than 1 flower nail in each cake though. I used one each and they turned out great. Fiddling with the oven temp, doesn't always work. I tried that too, and the flower nail is just so darn simple. Do a search on flower nail method in the forum if you are still wondering how to do it. Good luck

mrsmac888 Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 12:55am
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchockeyguy

I would use the flower nail technique for sure in the 14, and probably in the 12.

I'm curious about your sizes though. with 8, 12, and 14 your tiers aren't goign to be proportionally larger. I would think using a 10 top, or a 16 bottom, would look more "normal."




Hi. Thanks for all the advice! I just love this site! I remeasured the pans, they are 15, 10 and 6. That's pretty proportional, right?

Since I have to actually make 6 cakes, 2 of each, I think I'll try it both ways.

Thanks again!

sumerae Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 1:45am
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes



I find that with the nails, there is little to no hump, and in my life, they're easier to deal with than cake strips.

Rae




interesting...using a nail allows you to get by without the strips???

BlakesCakes Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 1:55am
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sumerae

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes



I find that with the nails, there is little to no hump, and in my life, they're easier to deal with than cake strips.

Rae



interesting...using a nail allows you to get by without the strips???




Does for me.
Rae

sumerae Posted 9 Sep 2010 , 8:53pm
post #18 of 18

I'll give it a try! Thanks! I've got a nail but don't have enough strips!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%