Covering A Large Cake In Fondant

Decorating By KaddyGal Updated 5 Sep 2010 , 7:57pm by KaddyGal

KaddyGal Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 12:47am
post #1 of 11

Hi everybody!
So I make a wedding cake this weekend. It was fondant covered. The largest base was 16 inches. It was a huge task for me to cover it on fondant. Is this normal? I did use home made MMF. Never have any problems with it. But I couldn't hardly roll the fondant out to be big enough to cover entire cake. Any suggestions for next time?
Thank so much guys!

10 replies
lynndy-lou Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 8:50am
post #2 of 11

You just need a very large work space and the longest rolling pin you can afford

FleurDeCake Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 9:06am
post #3 of 11

pvc pipe works great for a rolling pin.. and it is fairly inexpensive

lynndy-lou Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 9:14am
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by FleurDeCake

pvc pipe works great for a rolling pin.. and it is fairly inexpensive



Thats a good idea, never thought of that.

Caths_Cakes Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 9:41am
post #5 of 11

Im very lucky in the sense, that my mum had alot of cake stuff before i started, And naturally, that got handed down to me icon_smile.gif that included several marble rolling pins, ranging in size from 6'' to 18'' . . Bad news however, my house doesnt have big enough work surfaces!

it is a big task, especially when it comes to putting the fondant on the cake! You can buy fondant lifters, which would come in very handy but i made my own out of some plastic sheeting from the DIY store icon_smile.gif

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=40032&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=45

That is an excellent thread on cake lifters icon_smile.gif

CWR41 Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 3:51pm
post #6 of 11

You could try rolling your MMF out on a dusted 24" cardboard cake circle (shake the circle occasionally to make sure it isn't sticking), then slide it off directly onto your cake.

dguerrant Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 5:08pm
post #7 of 11

if the cake is stacked directly one ontop of the other, I measure the height of the tier and add enough to the top that will cover the edge and go under the next tier.

Example:
14 in round and a 12 inch round
tier height 4" plus a minimum of 1.5" for the top edge = 5.5" i usually
bump it up to at least 6"

measure the circumference of the cake then roll out a fondant strip to that length and cut a strip 6" wide and wrap around the cake and smooth over the edge, trim nice and neat, spackle if need be or cover with decorations

tony_sopranos_ebony_girl Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 5:15pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

You could try rolling your MMF out on a dusted 24" cardboard cake circle (shake the circle occasionally to make sure it isn't sticking), then slide it off directly onto your cake.





CWR41
That is a brilliant idea !!! thumbs_up.gif

CWR41 Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 6:11pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tony_sopranos_ebony_girl

Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

You could try rolling your MMF out on a dusted 24" cardboard cake circle (shake the circle occasionally to make sure it isn't sticking), then slide it off directly onto your cake.




CWR41
That is a brilliant idea !!! thumbs_up.gif




Thanks! It makes it easier for larger tiers when nothing else seems to work, especially with MMF that tends to stretch.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 6:28pm
post #10 of 11

I was going to suggest like dguerrant did, if there is a way the design will allow you to cover the cake in pieces rather than one large piece, then I would do that. Kinda like how you would for an extra tall cake.

KaddyGal Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 7:57pm
post #11 of 11

Thanks everyone!!
Some great advice. I get to try it out next weekend! icon_smile.gif
Anyway...with this last cake, I did try covering it in two different pieces. And I ended up having to do a TON of covering up! Any words of wisdom on getting it to blend nicely??

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