Cover Cake With Fondant

Decorating By cakegirl71 Updated 5 Sep 2010 , 2:29pm by Marianna46

cakegirl71 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 12:17pm
post #1 of 16

I have a cake to do on a Sunday.Will it be ok to cover the cake in fondant on Friday night and decorate it on Saturday night?

15 replies
msauer Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 12:35pm
post #2 of 16

It would be just fine.

cab333 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 1:53pm
post #3 of 16

Can I jump in with a question here? The layer of buttercream that one puts between the fondant and the cake, is it basically a messy crumb coat or more of a proper layer?

Mexx Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 2:02pm
post #4 of 16

Yes, a thin crumb coat.

cab333 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 2:07pm
post #5 of 16

Thanks Mexx, my fellow Canadian newbie (to the boards that is!) icon_smile.gif

catlharper Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:18pm
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cab333

Can I jump in with a question here? The layer of buttercream that one puts between the fondant and the cake, is it basically a messy crumb coat or more of a proper layer?




You want it to be a smooth as possible because any lump or bump in the crumbcoat will show thru the fondant. I do my coating just thick enough so you can no longer see the cake underneath but not nearly as thick as the final layer of BC would be.

Cat

leily Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:20pm
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cab333

Can I jump in with a question here? The layer of buttercream that one puts between the fondant and the cake, is it basically a messy crumb coat or more of a proper layer?




You do whatever works for you. Some people only put a thin crumbcoat on, others do a full layer of buttercream under the fondant. Others use a layer of ganache.

I personally do a normal layer of buttercream as if it was a buttercream cake. It's what works well for me and my customers.

Practice both ways and see what you prefer to do, there is no right or wrong way, just whatever way works for you!!

Marianna46 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:28pm
post #8 of 16

Your timetable for covering and decorating the cake is good - it's the one I always use, although sometimes I cover and decorate the same day, especially if I have fondant cutouts to put on the cake: fresh fondant sticks to fresh fondant very easily with just a little water or tylo glue. If the fondant is dry you need to use something like RI which is a little messier (and besides you have to make it and tint it, whereas I always have tylo glue on hand (1/2 cup water mixed with 1/4 tsp. of CMC, let sit for a few hours).

lyndim Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:30pm
post #9 of 16

I usually do a crumb coat then layer it in buttercream, many people don't like fondant so they can just peel off the fondant.

Stephy42088 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:47pm
post #10 of 16

I'm going to jump in with another question too, if thats alright. I've looked at various cake decorating books and some had you just putting a layer of jam or apricot glaze on the cake before putting on the fondant? No buttercream except for the filling. Others had you putting almond paste or marzipan as the layer underneath the fondant? I found these all very odd, anyone done anything like this or heard of it?

brincess_b Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:57pm
post #11 of 16

Stephy42088 - all those methods are tried and tested, and good. its about what works for you and the customer. although usually marzipan and fondant go on fruitcake, its quite popular on sponge too in the uk.
xx

MamaD77 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:05pm
post #12 of 16

Hi Stephy,

I think its quite a British thing to do, and also a rather more dated/old fashioned way of doing it. Many of the older books I've picked up from my local library teach this way of doing the base for fondant. I have to say it has been nothing short of miraculous since I've discovered CC that there's a better way of doing it than the jam coat. It truly is a PITA to have to work with, and now that I have discovered the buttercream way of doing the crumb/base coat, I will absolutely NEVER be going back to jam again!!

I also hated the taste with the jam, especially apricot, yuck!

Now that I've been enlightened to the ways of the buttercream, my caking has become soo much more enjoyable. icon_biggrin.gif

As for the marzipan, it's mostly used for fruitcake under fondant, although I'm not sure of the technical reasons behind it!!

HTH! icon_biggrin.gif

MamaD77 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:12pm
post #13 of 16

Hey brincess_b !

looks like we posted similar reply at same time there! I just noticed you're in Scotland too!! I should add that I agree with you, it is a case of personal/customer preference. The jam is just way too sticky for my liking, and a bit too thin. Much easier to cover up lumps and bumps etc with BC. It has been my saviour!!

Mexx Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:55pm
post #14 of 16

The apricot glaze and marzipan under fondant is generally only used on fruitcake.

cakegirl71 Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 1:10am
post #15 of 16

Thanks Mirianna46 for the tip on the Fondant.So if I cover the cake with fondant on Friday I may have a hard time getting my RI flowers to stick on Saturday?I gues I will use RI to get them to stick.

Marianna46 Posted 5 Sep 2010 , 2:29pm
post #16 of 16

Stephy42088, aside from the fact that cakes need a crumb coat, the thing about fondant is that it won't stick to cake itself, it needs something a little more moist. Some people use buttercream, some (like me) use ganache and some use strained apricot jam (a REALLY thin layer), which is what I used to do. Where I live now is too humid to use either buttercream or jam, which is why I switched to ganache. I also find that jam, no matter how thin I spread it, just makes the cake too sweet.

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