Covering Cake Board!

Decorating By DeezTreatz Updated 4 Sep 2010 , 11:10pm by lynndy-lou

DeezTreatz Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 2:14am
post #1 of 25

Hay guys!

What do you use to cover your cakeboard...
I'm interested in using colored foil as well... has anyone ever used that, and does Michaels sell Colored foil??

TIA! icon_biggrin.gif

24 replies
michel30014 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 3:27pm
post #2 of 25

I actually haven't had a chance to use the colored foil yet. Currently, I have been using gift wrapping paper and then going over it with clear contact paper. It works for me and it's cheaper!!

dchockeyguy Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 5:21pm
post #3 of 25

It all depends. Sometimes I use fondant adn sometimes I use what is basically florist foil paper. Since my cakes all sit on a card, they don't rest directly on the paper.

DeezTreatz Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 7:17pm
post #4 of 25

I just read that the foil isn't Food safety certified - and to keep your cake on a seperate cake board - then ontop of the foiled board....

DeezTreatz Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 7:21pm
post #5 of 25

Where can I find this foil? icon_biggrin.gif

AileenGP Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 7:38pm
post #6 of 25

I've seen colored foil at my local cake supply shop foil but generally I use freezer paper, glossy side up. Other times I'll cover the board in fondant. Whichever way I do it, I trim the edges in a ribbon that color coordinates with the cake design.

cathyscakes Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 7:53pm
post #7 of 25

I have decided that fondant is the way to go. It looks so pretty, with designs imprinted on it, just makes it more special.

lizzycakes Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:01pm
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeezTreatz

I just read that the foil isn't Food safety certified - and to keep your cake on a seperate cake board - then ontop of the foiled board....




Lol , maybe I don't understand what this means... but doesn't foil HAVE to be food safe?? I mean.. it's sold in order to wrap food in...

Doughnut Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:11pm
post #9 of 25

Hey Lizzy, the foil from the grocery store is different then the florist foil, but I cannot see why the florist foil would be considered "non-safe" for food.

lizzycakes Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:08pm
post #10 of 25

Ohh ok, thanks! Haha I didn't know they were still referring to the florist foil. I was about to get concerned.. I tried to rationalize it like " well.. hmm I know some people say the aluminum in deodorant causes breast cancer... so maybe aluminum foil for food is now unsafe, but why are they selling it for food!!??"

KayMc Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:11pm
post #11 of 25

Because florist foil could have lead and other ingredients in it, since it's not intended to be food safe.

KayMc Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:12pm
post #12 of 25

It was probably made in China, and MANY, MANY things in China have lead and very toxic substances in them. China doesn't have our standards for manufacturing. That's why there's always so many toys recalls.

jewels710 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:40pm
post #13 of 25

I have used the colored foils a lot (bought at our local bakers supply stores) and I find that if drop some buttercream on it that I need to wipe off, the color usually comes off with the icing...not good so I have decided its prob not a good idea to use it anymore.
Maybe I will consider using up what I have with clear over top.
As far as WILTON brand...I have only seen White, Silver and Gold. I have never had a problem with them losing their color.

Must be the difference between florisit and food safe!!!

DeezTreatz Posted 3 Sep 2010 , 12:25am
post #14 of 25

I called a few places and they didn't sell what I was looking for..
I'm looking for black foil wrap, I found it online though @ Goldas!

It seems that the silver, gold and clear you find at Micheals is food safe, its the other colors that are not(Florist foil)

Sooo I think i'll stick with fondant... which leads me to ask - When you cover a cake board in fondant - do you charge extra for that??

http://www.goldaskitchen.com/merchant.ihtml?pid=1723&step=4

lynndy-lou Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 1:55pm
post #15 of 25

Nearly all my boards are fondant covered and I do factor this into the cost of the cake

threetiercake Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 9:16pm
post #16 of 25

I prefer to use fondant as I think it does a neater finish. If it is covered in advance it hardens well and so makes it easy to set cake on top (with thin cake board under the cake) with less risk of damage as opposed to the risk of tearing the foil.

DeezTreatz Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 9:27pm
post #17 of 25

Lynnd-lou - how far in advance can you cover your cake board in fondant (a few days, a week, one day?) Just curious - I have to decorate a board and would like to do it about 5 days before I have to deliver it...

Will this be ok?

ohayr639 Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 9:43pm
post #18 of 25

Sorry to hi-jack but I had some questions about covering in fondant:

How thick do you roll the fondant?

Do you put it on in one piece or do the top and then the edges?

I have done it twice but the edges always break off. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

thatslifeca Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 10:13pm
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeezTreatz

I called a few places and they didn't sell what I was looking for..
I'm looking for black foil wrap, I found it online though @ Goldas!

It seems that the silver, gold and clear you find at Micheals is food safe, its the other colors that are not(Florist foil)

Sooo I think i'll stick with fondant... which leads me to ask - When you cover a cake board in fondant - do you charge extra for that??

http://www.goldaskitchen.com/merchant.ihtml?pid=1723&step=4




They carry it at McCall's. They have all colours including black. I believe they are between $7-$8, but there sure is a lot of it.

sweetooth0510 Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 10:35pm
post #20 of 25

I have covered my cake boards in fondant a few days before I do the rest of the cake (this way it hardens up so theres less likely to be any damage done) - can't see why you couldn't do it 5 days in advance though.

I roll out to around 2-3mm thick, only do the top of the board as the sides are covered in ribbon normally to tie into the cake design.

You can either cover the entire board in fondant or you can roll out to the correct shape and then cut out the circle/square of the bottom tier so that you are only covering the bare surface (this way you can decorate the cake on the board) - this way also saves you on wasted fondant.

lynndy-lou Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 10:50pm
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeezTreatz

Lynnd-lou - how far in advance can you cover your cake board in fondant (a few days, a week, one day?) Just curious - I have to decorate a board and would like to do it about 5 days before I have to deliver it...

Will this be ok?



You could do it a week in advance if you wanted to, the longer you leave it the better as it dries out and wont get any finger prints or dents in it.

lynndy-lou Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 10:55pm
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohayr639

Sorry to hi-jack but I had some questions about covering in fondant:

How thick do you roll the fondant?

Do you put it on in one piece or do the top and then the edges?

I have done it twice but the edges always break off. Any suggestions?

Thanks!



I roll the fondant roughly the same thickness as I would put on a cake. Roll it larger than you need dampen the board with water pop the fondant on the board then trim around the top like you would a pie. I then then round off the edges of the fondant with an icing smoother. Pop some ribbon around the bottom of the board and bobs your uncle a very professional finish

ohayr639 Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 10:58pm
post #23 of 25

Thanks!

DeezTreatz Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 11:06pm
post #24 of 25

Great! Thanks so much icon_biggrin.gif

lynndy-lou Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 11:10pm
post #25 of 25

Your both welcome. If theres one thing I do know about its fondant lol.
And I also agree with threetiercake
that its best to work on your cake with a seperate board under your cake that doesnt show, then you wont mark or damage your iced board.

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