How To Carry Fondant Covered Board And Not Get Fingerprints

Decorating By tesso Updated 12 Sep 2010 , 11:17pm by Adevag

tesso Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 4:10pm
post #1 of 14

okay, I have never covered a board in fondant, but I would like to try.

My biggest potential problem is.. How do you carry your boards and set the cakes down and NOT get fingerprints in the fondant? Once I set a cake down, I usually have to adjust the postion once or twice and I can just image the fingerprints.

I have seen some spectacular covered boards on here.. HOW do you prevent the prints??

13 replies
Caths_Cakes Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 4:15pm
post #2 of 14

You just have to be very very careful! when ever i cover a board, i do it a day or two before hand so its got a chance to dry out, then i run less risk of jabbing my fingers into it icon_smile.gif

thumbs Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 4:26pm
post #3 of 14

I cover almost all my boards in fondant for the finished look. I use the drum boards, then use a ribbon to cover the edge of the board.

That allows me to push or move the board a bit by putting my fingers on the edge.

I never cover a thin board that the fondant would have to go over the side of the board, just for that reason.

jjkarm Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 5:10pm
post #4 of 14

I try to cover my board a week in advance. This way the fondant is completely dry, so it's impossible to leave any marks in it. icon_biggrin.gif When the fondant's dry it's also easier to center the cake on the board. Sometimes I need to move or shift the cake slightly to make sure it's in the middle. If the fondant were still soft, I couldn't shift the cake at all.

Texas_Rose Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 5:17pm
post #5 of 14

When the fondant is dry, it's solid enough that I've had people ask where I found a plate to match the cake design. Just do it a few days in advance and you'll have no problems at all icon_biggrin.gif

Bluehue Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 5:29pm
post #6 of 14

This is my secret to *no prints on covered board* icon_biggrin.gif

I go to my local hardware store and i buy those little clear stick on thingys that you stick on your walls to stop the doors hitting your walls.
They are about 1/4 inch x 1/4 square.....and about 1/8 inch high.

Stick them on board evenly spaced plus 2 in the centre - flip board over - cover as per normal with fonadant/medium.

Slip off set spatular under board - lift - carry to airing rack - sit it down - and allow to dry overnight.

Next morning - covered board is hard as nails - and i just slip my off set spatular under it again and take to work bench.

Sit decorated cake on board - slide off set spatular under again and lift to cake carrier to transport it.

PERFECT - and you fingers never touch the board.
as you can *just* get your fingers under it using your off set spatular.

Best thing is - at the end of the function the customer can lift said board up - and not worry about cake sliding off board or squashing their fingers - icon_wink.gif

They are clear - so nobody sees them - i have had 9 out of 10 customers thank me after every delivery for *making it wasy for them to lift* the cakes and for such an ingenious method - thumbs_up.gificon_lol.gif

If you look at my photo of *square Red with Butteflies* in my photo gallery and look at the clear perspex cake stand you can see a very similar *clear foot* on the corners of that cake stand -
Gives you a better visual of what i am talking about.
Yes, they are under that red cake board also... thumbs_up.gif

Best thing is - because they are either silicon or rubber they don't slip slide or move during transportation.. thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

I just add the 4.00 per pack onto my costing - same as every other cost of making a cake. icon_smile.gif


Bluehue

DianeLM Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 5:47pm
post #7 of 14

I do something similar to Bluehue's method. I cut a circle a couple inches smaller than the base board and glue that underneath. It elevates the board just enough to get your fingers under. I do this for cakes that don't have fondant covered boards. It's just easier to get a hold of the cake!

icer101 Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 6:00pm
post #8 of 14

i also do as bluehue. works great

Jayde Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 6:16pm
post #9 of 14

I used to use fondant, but someone suggested RI once to me. I thought what a great idea! It's totally cheap, I do it in advance, I can swirl colors together or pipe swirls or designs, I can flood areas in certain colors, the possibilities are endless. Let it dry for a week and you cant put your fingers through it, it dries hard. I ribbon the edge usually and its ready to go.

I wish I could post a picture of that hippie cake that I did awhile back when I was doing cakes. I made a tiedye board by flooding in different colors in rings and then I dragged a skewer through it to make the tiedye part. It turned out so cool!

I dont mean to discourage you from using fondant to cover your board though, you could try kneading some tylose into the fondant and that would make it dry hard overnight. I just like the RI medium for that, its so cheap and easy and I can make it in a million different colors so much easier than coloring and kneading fondant.

tesso Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 5:12am
post #10 of 14

Thank you so much for all the great info. I am going to get some of those things for the bottom of the board and make my covered boards at least a week in advance.

And I am going to try the RI too.

Thanks again. icon_biggrin.gif

poohsmomma Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 1:04pm
post #11 of 14

Tesso,
Walmart has non-skid rubber gripper pads meant for chair or table legs. I put them on the bottom of my cake boards. works like Bluehue says.

Bluehue Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 1:31pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by poohsmomma

Tesso,
Walmart has non-skid rubber gripper pads meant for chair or table legs. I put them on the bottom of my cake boards. works like Bluehue says.




I looked at those over here - but alas they were to big - huge actually for my cake boards... icon_rolleyes.gif ..especially the 8 inch ones and smaller.
But its a great invention isn't it and makes things alot easier to handle - not only for us but for our customers.. icon_smile.gif
Bluehue.

Jayde Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 3:13pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue


I looked at those over here - but alas they were to big - huge actually for my cake boards... icon_rolleyes.gif ..especially the 8 inch ones and smaller.
But its a great invention isn't it and makes things alot easier to handle - not only for us but for our customers.. icon_smile.gif
Bluehue.




Funnily enough, I used those back in the van when we were transporting. They provided a non slip surface for the cakes to sit on. They sell it in rolls by the shelf paper, even the dollar store has it though the rolls arent that big, I lined the back of the van with it and we didnt have cakes moving anymore.

Adevag Posted 12 Sep 2010 , 11:17pm
post #14 of 14

I put tylose powder in the fondant that I cover my boards with. It dries hard much faster and that way I don't have to cover the board days ahead. I usually cover cake first and with fondant left over I add tylose and cover board with, because it gets hard that quick!

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