Your Top Tips For Icing Mini Cakes

Decorating By jojo76 Updated 30 Aug 2010 , 7:37pm by jojo76

jojo76 Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 8:35am
post #1 of 6

I'm looking to start offering mini fruit cakes for christmas, and also want to give mini tiered cakes a go....I keep hearing that they are a nightmare to cover. I'll be icing in fondant rather than buttercream.
Anyone have any tips on how to get these iced without them sliding all over the table, do any of you use non slip matting underneath? How do you get them smooth, Im thinking the regular smoothers will be too big?
Also, last question icon_biggrin.gif If I was to try tiered mini cakes, what support would you put in them to keep them together? I am thinking you cut or buy cardboards for each teir and maybe use one dowel in each teir? And secure each teir with a little buttercream?

Any advice greatly received, thanks everyone! icon_smile.gificon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

5 replies
Cakechick123 Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 8:45am
post #2 of 6

I do them quite often, and they are a PAIN!!

it depends on how big your minis are. I mostly do little 3" ones. The best way I have of covering those are to roll out a big piece of fondant and then use a large circle cutter (about 4.5") to cut circles. I then cover the bottom of this circle wit BC and place the circle on the cake and smooth it down. I ude both my smoother and my hands to get it covered. This way i dont have to battle to cover finiky little cakes that moves all over the place witrh bc.

I made two tier ones before and those were 4.5" bottom and 3" tops. I did not dowel them at all as the top one was so small. I stacked them and covered in one go.

HTH

jojo76 Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 12:04pm
post #3 of 6

Hi Cakechick, thanks for the tips - that is a great idea to cover the fondant rather than the cake in buttercream, I would never have thought to do it that way!!
So with your two teir ones, when you say you stacked them and covered them in one go, do you mean you covered both teirs in one piece of fondant, all in one? And then smoothe it around both cakes? And did you put your top cake on a little cardboard or stack directly on to the other without cardboard?
Thanks so much for your help, it's great to hear how youve tackled them! Do you find there is quite a market for them?
icon_biggrin.gif

jojo76 Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 12:22pm
post #4 of 6

Hi Cakechick, thanks for the tips - that is a great idea to cover the fondant rather than the cake in buttercream, I would never have thought to do it that way!!
So with your two teir ones, when you say you stacked them and covered them in one go, do you mean you covered both teirs in one piece of fondant, all in one? And then smoothe it around both cakes? And did you put your top cake on a little cardboard or stack directly on to the other without cardboard?
Thanks so much for your help, it's great to hear how youve tackled them! Do you find there is quite a market for them?
icon_biggrin.gif

Cakechick123 Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 5:03pm
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo76


So with your two teir ones, when you say you stacked them and covered them in one go, do you mean you covered both teirs in one piece of fondant, all in one? And then smoothe it around both cakes?



Yes, I covered them in one go, this saves a lot of time

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And did you put your top cake on a little cardboard or stack directly on to the other without cardboard?



No I didnt use a board, as they were only about 2" high I didnt think it needed a board, I just "glued" them together with some bc.


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Do you find there is quite a market for them?
icon_biggrin.gif



At one stage it was very fasionable to have mini cakes, but TG the fad seems to be over for now icon_smile.gif

jojo76 Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 7:37pm
post #6 of 6

lol ok thanks so much for all the advice. Im going to try to sell them as thank you gifts/christmas gifts/mothersday gifts and so on! Well Ill see how much I hate icing them first I guess lol!

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