Quick! Wrapping A Cake To Keep It Moist For The Night?

Decorating By sumerae Updated 4 Sep 2010 , 4:20pm by catlharper

sumerae Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 12:26am
post #1 of 16

Baked a cake tonight, not making the frosting or decorating tomorrow....what should I do with it tonight? It's still cooling on the racks right now.

TIA! icon_biggrin.gif

15 replies
Lita829 Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 12:42am
post #2 of 16

I'd just wrap it in layers of Saran Wrap and foil and leave it out. I did this with a cake I made in June...when it was 85 degrees (at night) and it was still very moist in the am. I finished baking the cakes around 11pm and started making the icing and decoratind around 6am the next morning. It worked well for me.

Teresa1976 Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 12:43am
post #3 of 16

wrap in saran wrap and put in the fridge, this is how I do all my cakes and they are always moist.

iamcakin Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 12:45am
post #4 of 16

I just double/triple wrap in Saran-type wrap, no foil. Be careful not to pull your cakes out of shape when wrapping, and make certain that the film is sealed onto the cake board at the bottom. thumbs_up.gif

carmijok Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 12:46am
post #5 of 16

I personally like to wrap my cakes in cling wrap and freeze them. Makes crumb coating very easy. You don't HAVE to freeze them but I like to. And I've have never had a problem with condensation or any other issues The bakery I worked for would wrap in cling wrap and at least refrigerate them if they were going to work on them the next day.

eperales0411 Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 12:47am
post #6 of 16

Saran wrap always works for me, either in the fridge or at room temp. This helps to keep the cake moist and fresh.

careylynn Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 12:54am
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

I personally like to wrap my cakes in cling wrap and freeze them. Makes crumb coating very easy. You don't HAVE to freeze them but I like to. And I've have never had a problem with condensation or any other issues The bakery I worked for would wrap in cling wrap and at least refrigerate them if they were going to work on them the next day.




When you say freezing the cake makes it easier to crumb coat, in what way? I have never frozen a cake before but have my first wedding (YAY) coming up in October and I've thought about baking ahead of time and freezing. You do thaw the cake first right?? (sorry if this a "duh" question icon_smile.gif lol)

sumerae Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 1:14am
post #8 of 16

Do I have to put it on the cake board or can I just wrap each layer in it's on saran wrap?

Question about freezing...I assume you would then crumb coat while it's frozen, that does cause any issues w/ the frosting (which would be room temp) when the cake thaws?

careylynn Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 4:11pm
post #9 of 16

bump...i wanna know the answer to the freezing and crumb coating thing!!

grandmomof1 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 4:25pm
post #10 of 16

I buy large trash bags, put wax paper over top of the cake, and store the cake in the sealed trash bag. This works great for the larger cakes and I have never had any problem with dry cakes.

catlharper Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:16pm
post #11 of 16

I always freeze my cakes at least overnight. I bake, cool, level, torte, wrap each layer in press and seal then wrap it all together and freeze. Then I take it out of the freezer, fill and crumbcoat then let settle and come to room temp for at least 3 hours. The ice crystals are trapped inside the crumbcoat keeping the cake nice and moist. A frozen cake is easier to crumbcoat since it's a firm surface to work on. Also, letting it settle and come to room temp for at least 3 hours allows the cake to expell any gas/air so you won't end up with air bubble blow outs in your final coat of BC or gas bubbles in the fondant. Settling also helps to prevent buldges in your cake where the two layers meet. HTH

Cat

Marianna46 Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 10:37pm
post #12 of 16

I basically do what catlharper does (except for the press and seal, because I can't get it where I live). It works great and you can bake to your heart's content as long ahead as you need to - or until you run out of freezer space!

careylynn Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:10pm
post #13 of 16

Do you think that works with ganaching a cake? Freezing it first then ganaching? I would be afraid that it would harden the ganache too much while working with it.

catlharper Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 11:36pm
post #14 of 16

I hope someone answers the ganache question cause I'd love to know the answer..I'm thinking the same thing tho'..that it would harden the ganache too much.

vwolf Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 12:08pm
post #15 of 16

If you crumbcoat before the cake is thawed do you not have any issues with trapping the moisture inside the cake when it is completely thawed? Hope that doesn't sound dumb...but I haven't tried doing that, was afraid of some kind of disaster. icon_confused.gif

catlharper Posted 4 Sep 2010 , 4:20pm
post #16 of 16

it keeps it from getting dry. All of my cakes are wonderfully moist, not wet, just moist. I have no need to ever use simple syrup or anything like that because of this method.

Cat

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