Confused About Covering A Cake With Fondant

Decorating By gatorcake Updated 28 Aug 2010 , 4:07am by catlharper

gatorcake Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 11:00pm
post #1 of 7

Sorry if this has been addressed, I did look around for the answer but could not find one.

So I have watched a number of videos on how to cover a cake with fondant, but they all seem to start after the cake has been iced. My question goes to the icing of the cake before covering it.

How iced does the cake have to be? Some look they have rather think "crumb coats", others look like they have just barely any buttercream. Also I am concerned about straight sides, I am assuming if the cake is not "squared off" (right angles at the top corner, straight sides) before it is covered in fondant it will not be squared off after covering it. Is this correct?

Or maybe put more simply does the round have to be smoothed as if you were going to decorate with buttercream?

Too many videos with different advice--anyone that can clear things up for me? These answers maybe obvious but have to prepare a cake for covering with fondant for class in a few days and want to be sure I get it right.

6 replies
catlharper Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 11:37pm
post #2 of 7

I have found the that thickness of the crumbcoat is a personal preference. So you may need some trial and error sessions finding out what works best for you. Personally mine is thick enough that you can't see the cake through it but not as thick as a final coat of BC would be. And yes, the smoother the crumbcoat the smoother your fondant will appear and yes, you have to make sure you straighten out the cake before the fondant goes on. I recently didn't realize that one side of my cake was a bit off till after it was stacked and fully decorated...even though the top of the cake was level the crooked side makes the cake look crooked. SIGH. So get it as straight as possible with trimming and your crumbcoat and then after letting it settle (I start with a frozen cake so I let it settle at least 3 hours to come to room temp and let any filling sploosh out) and come to room temperature you can roll out and cover with the fondant. Settling does two things. It allows your cake to come to room temperature (if you cover a cold cake you can have gas bubble problems since gas/air is released as the cake comes to room temp) as well as allows the cake to do whatever compressing/settling it needs to do. This will keep your fondant from puddling as the cake settles.

Sadly covering with fondant is not a "success every time" sort of thing. Different elements will effect your efforts like heat, humidity, the amount of sugar to marshmallow ratio, the thickness of the fondant, the weight of the decorations..there are a million variables and the best you can hope for is to find what works best for you and learn how to correct any issues you might run into. HTH

Cat

KJ62798 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 11:38pm
post #3 of 7

The more perfect/smooth your undercoat is, the better your final coat of fondant will be.

I do both a crumb coat and a smooth coat of BC. Some people do just a thick first coat of BC--heavier than a crumb coat but not a full frosting coat. Another method is to use a coat of chocolate ganache. I've never tried it but it is supposed to be very smooth if you go over it with a hot spatula.

The best thing is to practice. Bake a 6in and try out different methods to find out what works best for you. You can always pull it off and start over--it's only cake icon_rolleyes.gif

Kristy

gatorcake Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 1:03am
post #4 of 7

Thanks for clarifying the process. thumbs_up.gif

DefyGravity Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 1:38am
post #5 of 7

For me, it depends. I've done a variety of BC amounts under my fondant (mostly just experimenting). I like to put just enough on to where the cake has a nice, even shape to it, because it makes smoothing the fondant a lot easier. I've also put a lot under, but made sure the BC was cold and solid enough to stand up to the fondant application.

There isn't typically one right way to do anything, so the best thing is usually to try and try again until you find a good fit for you.

gatorcake Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 3:40am
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefyGravity

For me, it depends. I've done a variety of BC amounts under my fondant (mostly just experimenting). I like to put just enough on to where the cake has a nice, even shape to it, because it makes smoothing the fondant a lot easier. I've also put a lot under, but made sure the BC was cold and solid enough to stand up to the fondant application.

There isn't typically one right way to do anything, so the best thing is usually to try and try again until you find a good fit for you.




Nod only difficulty is it is for the Wilton fondant class and I live 35+ miles from my Michaels. By the time I drive up and class gets started no way the buttercream will be chilled.

catlharper Posted 28 Aug 2010 , 4:07am
post #7 of 7

I am one that never chills my buttercream. A lot of people will let the cake settle and come to room temp and then chill the BC for 15mins before covering but I never ever do that. It comes to room temp and stays at room temp. I use a crusting BC so I usually smooth it again with a damp offset spatual to moisten it then cover it with the fondant.

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