How Many Of Us Crumb Coat Cakes???...

Decorating By Mikel79 Updated 27 Aug 2010 , 8:59pm by Rose_N_Crantz

Mikel79 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 2:33pm
post #1 of 28

Hi Cakers!! icon_biggrin.gif

I am curious about crumb coating. Personally, I do not. I bought Sharon Zambito Buttecream DVD awhile ago and she states she does not do it either. I thought, if the best don't use it, then I don't need to!! =)

However, for those of you who do crumb coat, is there really a huge difference?

I don't get crumbs in my cakes, so I was wondering if crumb coating can help in any other ways??

Thanks,

Michael icon_biggrin.gif

27 replies
debbief Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 2:49pm
post #2 of 28

I don't crumbcoat when I cover my cake in fondant. If it's just buttercream, then yes I crumbcoat it.

ETA: Ok so after I posted this, I looked at your gallery. Your cakes look great and you're right, no crumbs! I don't think I'd be able to get that clean look without crumbcoating first. You obviously got it down! thumbs_up.gif

leily Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 2:51pm
post #3 of 28

i don't crmbcoat either. i use the icer tip so i don't have to worry about pulling any of the cake up, i just smooth out the icing

TexasSugar Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 2:53pm
post #4 of 28

I don't crumb coat every cake. If it is chocolate cake, and I am using white icing and it seems to have some lose crumbs on it I will crumb coat.

If it is a carved cake that has exposed cuts, then I will crumb coat, especially since I don't use the cake icer tip alot on carved cakes.

michel30014 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 3:00pm
post #5 of 28

Generally, I don't crumbcoat either. Unless, it's a chocolate cake, then I will crumbcoat. I don't want the chocolate to show through if I'm using white frosting. If it's a colored frosting, I don't worry about it so much. I use buttercream for the most part and generally, my accents are in fondant but I haven't learned (yet) how to cover an entire cake with fondant. (I will learn one of these days!!)

CWR41 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 3:02pm
post #6 of 28

I don't, however, I can certainly appreciate the benefits of crumb coating on carved cakes.

jones5cm Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 3:05pm
post #7 of 28

I've always heard that crumb coating when you have to let tiers sit for any length of time helps retain moistness too; anyone else heard this?

itscake Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 3:15pm
post #8 of 28

I always crumb coat...for fondant covered cakes...and it does help to keep the cake moist...if you are working on several layers at a time...

Mikel79 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 3:17pm
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by debbief

I don't crumbcoat when I cover my cake in fondant. If it's just buttercream, then yes I crumbcoat it.

ETA: Ok so after I posted this, I looked at your gallery. Your cakes look great and you're right, no crumbs! I don't think I'd be able to get that clean look without crumbcoating first. You obviously got it down! thumbs_up.gif




Thanks Debbie!!

All of my cakes are BC iced. In order for my cakes to settle, I place them in a food safe plastic bag. The bag keeps it nice and moist. This was a tip from Sharon Zambito on her BC DVD.

Thanks folks for replying!!

Michael icon_biggrin.gif

cakesdivine Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 4:40pm
post #10 of 28

If I don't have to trim or level the cake any or if using the icing tip then no, but if it is a carved cake or I have had to do alot of "surgery" to get it level or cut off edges then yes I crumb coat.

ddaigle Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 4:53pm
post #11 of 28

I always crumb coat every cake..every time and let sit in frig overnight to rest and firm up.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 4:53pm
post #12 of 28

I crumbcoat on a case by case basis. If the cake looks kinda crummy and I'm working with an icing that's rather stiff, then I do. But if the icing is easily spreadable, the cake isn't crummy, then no. I use a speed icer too, so that helps a lot.

Loucinda Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 5:31pm
post #13 of 28

If it is a cake for a client, it gets crumbcoated no matter what kind of cake it is. If it is for home use, I don't worry about it.

janeoxo Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 5:47pm
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle

I always crumb coat every cake..every time and let sit in frig overnight to rest and firm up.




Ditto

sweet-thing Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 5:52pm
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

If it is a cake for a client, it gets crumbcoated no matter what kind of cake it is. If it is for home use, I don't worry about it.





Same here.

Sassy74 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:02pm
post #16 of 28

Same as TexasSugar. If it's a chocolate cake, or a red velvet cake (any cake with a dark crumb) then I crumbcoat. Also, if I carve, I crumbcoat. Otherwise, nope.

awatterson Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:12pm
post #17 of 28

Mikel79, your cakes are amazing! I wouldn't change I thing if I were you. Whatever you are doing is working for you!

sugaah Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:14pm
post #18 of 28

I need to crumb coat but I have the icer tip and would love to use it but i need a larger size bag rather than having to stop and refill after a swipe. Where would i purchase large size icing bag and what size should i get.

HobbyCaker Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:14pm
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by janeoxo

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle

I always crumb coat every cake..every time and let sit in frig overnight to rest and firm up.



Ditto




Me too!

Rosie2 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:23pm
post #20 of 28

I always feel I need to crumb coat...I mostly use the Wasc recipe and it has a lot of crumbs---does everyone has the same experience or is it me??
Can someone recommend a nice firm white cake to minimize on the crumb coating?

I noticed in Sharon Zambito's videos that she works with cakes that look soooo smooth and firm...is there a recipe here in CC for a firm but moist cake??

leily Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:24pm
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugaah

I need to crumb coat but I have the icer tip and would love to use it but i need a larger size bag rather than having to stop and refill after a swipe. Where would i purchase large size icing bag and what size should i get.




Wherever wilton is sold they typically carry larger bags. (not disposable) I use a 20", but i bought mine at a restaurant supply store. I would suggest at least a 16", but i like the larger the better. I have only two bags that are not disposable and one is cut for the icer tip and the other is cut for the large tips like 2M.

Mikel79 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:30pm
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by awatterson

Mikel79, your cakes are amazing! I wouldn't change I thing if I were you. Whatever you are doing is working for you!




Thank You!! Still practicing so I can come as close to perfection that I can! I have a looooong way yet!.

icon_biggrin.gif

Michael

Mikel79 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:33pm
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosie2

I always feel I need to crumb coat...I mostly use the Wasc recipe and it has a lot of crumbs---does everyone has the same experience or is it me??
Can someone recommend a nice firm white cake to minimize on the crumb coating?

I noticed in Sharon Zambito's videos that she works with cakes that look soooo smooth and firm...is there a recipe here in CC for a firm but moist cake??




I also use the WASC from this site. I don't find it to be that crumbly. But, different folks get different results =(

Sharon Zambito has told me via PM that she uses the WASC shown on this site. In her Back to Basics DVD she provides a booklet with recipes. There is the WASC and the DURABLE cake recipe. The durable is super tight crumb. However, very moist!!!

HTH =)
Michael

imagenthatnj Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:43pm
post #24 of 28

sugaah, I don't make cakes, but I buy a lot of toys... My icing tip came with a 24" bag and when I look at it, the size scares me. It's almost as long as my arm! I got it at PastryChef.com.

http://www.pastrychef.com/CAKE-ICER-BAG-WITH-TIP_p_1455.html

Rosie2 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 6:48pm
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikel79

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosie2

I always feel I need to crumb coat...I mostly use the Wasc recipe and it has a lot of crumbs---does everyone has the same experience or is it me??
Can someone recommend a nice firm white cake to minimize on the crumb coating?

I noticed in Sharon Zambito's videos that she works with cakes that look soooo smooth and firm...is there a recipe here in CC for a firm but moist cake??



I also use the WASC from this site. I don't find it to be that crumbly. But, different folks get different results =(

Sharon Zambito has told me via PM that she uses the WASC shown on this site. In her Back to Basics DVD she provides a booklet with recipes. There is the WASC and the DURABLE cake recipe. The durable is super tight crumb. However, very moist!!!

HTH =)
Michael


Ahhh, thank you Michael, I will look for the video!

indydebi Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 7:16pm
post #26 of 28

I do simply because it just makes for a smoother cake when putting on the final coat of icing (for me). Once in a blue moon, I've had a great cake cooperate and the crumb coat turned into the actual final icing.

cakeythings1961 Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 8:22pm
post #27 of 28

Crumb coating works great for me, but only if I can chill it before putting on the final coat. Otherwise, I might just as well skip it.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 8:59pm
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj

sugaah, I don't make cakes, but I buy a lot of toys... My icing tip came with a 24" bag and when I look at it, the size scares me. It's almost as long as my arm! I got it at PastryChef.com.

http://www.pastrychef.com/CAKE-ICER-BAG-WITH-TIP_p_1455.html




I use a 24 inch bag too. I can't imagine base icing without it. I got some 10 inch bags from my mom once and I'm like "what the heck am I gonna do with this?"

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