Stacking Buttercream Cakes

Decorating By sharonk Updated 27 May 2011 , 9:47am by sabiha

sharonk Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 11:07pm
post #1 of 13

Is there a trick to stacking buttercream on top buttercream, without messing up both of them? I am having a heck of a time trying to figure this out.

12 replies
Cindy619 Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 11:23pm
post #2 of 13

I like to use a cake lifter, that way I'm not accidentally sticking my fingers into the cakes! With the lifter, I gently set one side of the cake on top of the other, then slowly slide out the lifter being careful not to hit the cake below. HTH!

tokazodo Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 11:25pm
post #3 of 13

I always tend to get my fingers into everything and it used to aggravate me until I found the Viva method for smoothing.
Cake life is much less stressful now. Tonedna on youtube shows how to do the viva method.
She also has an excellent method for stacking.

good Luck, I hope this helps.

kansaslaura Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 11:27pm
post #4 of 13

Both tiers need to be on at lease a cardboard circle or a seperator plate. Are you trying to lift up a cake with nothing under it?

kansaslaura Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 11:29pm
post #6 of 13
Quote:


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I love her videos!

carmijok Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 11:41pm
post #7 of 13

My buttercream cake is very cold when I stack...hence pretty sturdy. But I use a full butter frosting that hardens quite nicely. And rather than run a dowel through tiers top down, I let the cake slide down the dowel (it's on a pre-cut cardboard base that I have covered with Freezer paper--also pre-cut).

JustGettinStarted Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 1:07am
post #8 of 13

I had a question about stacking in regards to the cake plate...if I use cardboard circles, do they need to be covered with foil or can I just use them straight from the package?

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 1:42am
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustGettinStarted

I had a question about stacking in regards to the cake plate...if I use cardboard circles, do they need to be covered with foil or can I just use them straight from the package?




If any of the cardboard is going to show, I would wrap it. To avoid unsightly grease stains. But if they're going to be completely covered, then you don't have to wrap them.

JustGettinStarted Posted 27 Aug 2010 , 1:47am
post #10 of 13

Thanks! icon_smile.gif

sabiha Posted 27 May 2011 , 5:09am
post #11 of 13

I watched the video on utube by Edna..........if u have boards under each tier ....how does the last dowel that is to go through all the tiers pass through the boards? should the cardboard base be a soft one?

tokazodo Posted 27 May 2011 , 9:18am
post #12 of 13

You can use waxed cardboard cake circles, or cover plain cardboard cake circles with wax paper. The circles are supported within the layer, with bubble straws, tea straws or wooden dowels. You sharpen the main support dowel to a point. (some use pencil sharpener, I use a razor box knife)
Then you hammer that puppy home! It just kind of magically goes through all layers. It's kind of hard the first time to actually think you can do this. It still amazes me that it works, and doesn't destroy the cake. I've done it many times and each time I take a deep breath, say a prayer and whack away at it.
As you hammer the dowel will make a dull thud sound when it gets through the final layer of cardboard on the bottom tier.

sabiha Posted 27 May 2011 , 9:47am
post #13 of 13

Thanks tokazodo............wish me luck, this will be the first time i try this..................hopefully all will be well

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