Starting Up A Business

Business By CakesbyCase Updated 2 Sep 2010 , 1:20am by CakesbyCase

CakesbyCase Posted 25 Aug 2010 , 8:22pm
post #1 of 11

Would appreciate any information regarding supplies, etc needed to start up a bakery/cake/cupcake/business.

I've been flipping thru this forum for days now and can't find one specifically answering how I determine supply cost, what I need to have on hand, for opening a storefront.

I MAY have a perfect opportunity (business and financial backer), but he's asking for what my start up costs would be for equipment, supplies, ingredients, etc. I just want to be certain that I don't forget anything so I appreciate any insight, opinions, comments, etc.

Thank you!

10 replies
leah_s Posted 25 Aug 2010 , 8:32pm
post #2 of 11

That should be specifically addressed in your Business Plan. You'll need to visit your local restaurant supply store for the big equipment and also for smallwares. They have kitchen planners on staff who will do a floor layout and equipment list, many times for free. They assume they're building a relationship and you;ll buy the equipment from them.

BethG Posted 25 Aug 2010 , 8:35pm
post #3 of 11

Are you doing it out of your home or a store front. If a store front how big. Does it have a place for you sink, dishwasher. hand washing sink. what does the health department expect it to have and the cost of that. Then u have to consider display area, counters, workstation, refrigeration or refrigerator, stove, oven. color of the walls and decor. Consultation area. That is just a few things that come to mind. Then mixers, and utensils. And then on cakes it varies on what kind you do, to how many you need... From past experience especially on doing weedding cakes it does help to have at least 2 pans of eachsize. Round ones for sure. Hope this helps/

DefyGravity Posted 25 Aug 2010 , 9:05pm
post #4 of 11

This probably sounds stupid, but my husband has always talked about owning his own machine shop, so one day I bought him a book that was called "Everything You Need To Know About Business Plans" or something like that, and it is incredibly thorough.

It couldn't hurt to pick up a basic business book or get one from the library, just so you have a solid resource for some starting direction.

CakesbyCase Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 1:35am
post #5 of 11

Thank you all for the advice. I have scoured the library for some info.

This will be for a storefront. I'm lucky enough to have someone that wants to partner with me. He will handle all the business aspects...licensure, banking, lease, etc. He wants me for my icon_lol.gif brilliant icon_lol.gif baking skills (haha!)

I believe that the storefront already has the basic kitchen supplies (he's checking into that) - he wanted me to put together a cost list of what I would need for supplies - pans, tips, cake boards, packaging, ingredients.

leily Posted 26 Aug 2010 , 2:56am
post #6 of 11

don't forget to check with the health department and fire deparment for local fire codes. These two places have requirements that you may not think of until it's to late and you'd be hit with unexpected cost.

JulieM Posted 29 Aug 2010 , 7:26pm
post #7 of 11

The best place to find large equipment is an auction.

Ovens, industrial refrigerators, prep tables etc. can all be found used, but in excellent shape and you can check online for what the going rate is and then bid lower and hope for a great deal. Also, chairs and tables and display cases can be found this way too.

Restraunt supply companies will have new equipment and furniture for you to price and purchase.

But I would check Craiglist or an auction first. I won an industrial fridge at auction and only paid half it's value. icon_smile.gif

I find the best deals on small supplies online. This includes, cake boards, cupcake liners, fondant and gum paste tools, frosting bags and tips, etc.

Check out globalsugarart.com or others (cake central won't let me post other suppliers here, but you can find them through a search in google for bakery supplies).

You can google any specific supply you need and search that way, too for deals.

For ingredients, you will need to get in touch with your local bakery supply or food warehouse stores. We have some in our area that I have used for some things. I have still found that the local grocery store's bulk food section or Sam's Club has competitive pricing. Take a day and just visit suppliers with a notebook and price your core ingredients (flour, sugar, etc.)

You will need to decide on packaging. I purchase boxes online through U.S. Box Corp. and was happy with their product and pricing.

You will need to have business cards printed. Choose a name and a logo and compare printing cost. I found good prices through www.vistaprint.com.

You will need to purchase a computer, and probably a good business program that will track your orders, purchases, etc. online.

You may also need purchase order slips, a cash register, receipts etc. if you intend to be open for retail sales.

That is just a list of a few things that come to mind. There are some helpful things here online to help small bakeries get started. Also, books are available at the Library as an additional resource.

Good luck to you!
Julie

CWR41 Posted 29 Aug 2010 , 9:26pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenziecakes

Would appreciate any information regarding supplies, etc needed to start up a bakery/cake/cupcake/business.

I've been flipping thru this forum for days now and can't find one specifically answering how I determine supply cost, what I need to have on hand, for opening a storefront.




I would hope, if you're ready to open a storefront, that you'd already know what supplies are needed to have on hand and what your supply costs are based on which suppliers you are already using.

Maybe this link will help: "Cake Supplies"
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=680250&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=vendor&&start=0

Good luck!

shalini1 Posted 31 Aug 2010 , 5:16pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenziecakes

This will be for a storefront. I'm lucky enough to have someone that wants to partner with me. He will handle all the business aspects...licensure, banking, lease, etc. He wants me for my icon_lol.gif brilliant icon_lol.gif baking skills (haha!)




A contract will definitely be prudent. How would the business be broken up? Will it be a 50/50 partnership; or will he own more of it. I know that decorating is hard, but if push comes to shove and the relationship sours, will he just kick you out of the business and find another decorator? Just think details should def be hashed out to get all the legal complications out of the way

Kaka Posted 1 Sep 2010 , 5:48pm
post #10 of 11

Hi kenziecakes

How is going to work financially for you? Are you going to have a regular salary too? How much will you have in this partnership? I am starting a business and thinking about doing something just like that!
Thanks!
Kaka

CakesbyCase Posted 2 Sep 2010 , 1:20am
post #11 of 11

This is in the very, very early stages so we are working out all of the details, fine and otherwise. I'll definitely make sure that we'd have a contract in place prior to finalizing anything. I know enough to know that words don't mean anything unless backed by paper. The financial backing would mostly come from him and I would supply the menu, baking skills etc.

He has experience in new business start-ups and I have experience in the food industry.

We are currently both (very) miserable in our current positions at the same company and both believe that we could succeed in a bakery operation (AND, more importantly that there would be a need in the area.)

For now, I would say I'm on the fact finding mission of it all. I was looking for and appreciate all advice and suggestions.

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