"baked Fresh Daily?"

Business By kelsiedelizzle Updated 7 Sep 2010 , 1:58am by costumeczar

kelsiedelizzle Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 12:41am
post #1 of 34

I'm curious about whether people who own/work in bakeries make their pastries & desserts that day, or if they freeze them ahead of time.

I've frozen cakes and cupcakes ahead of time before (I'm just a hobbyist...for now) and never noticed a flavor/quality difference, but I know people can be a stickler for frozen food, ie they won't eat it (when I was working at Publix, a woman threw down a creme cake when she found out they're frozen then thawed before being sold. She was kinda nasty icon_sad.gif )

Anyway, what do y'all do? Do you have time to bake every day (apparently that's what they do on DC Cupcakes) and what do you do with the leftovers at the end of the day? Please tell me you don't throw them away! I hated doing that with the donuts at Publix.

And if you do freeze then thaw, do customers complain?

I'm talking about cupcakes, muffins, donuts, cakes, you name it! More of a bakery question than a cake studio question, I suppose.

TIA!

33 replies
littlecake Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 2:35am
post #2 of 34

the freezer is your friend....i freeze everything...but i usually use it that week, i don't freeze real far in advance, that way one whole day can be dedicated to ther baking for the week.

indydebi Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 2:48am
post #3 of 34

Sure! Any bakery can say they "bake fresh daily!" The fact that they sell the Monday baked goods on Friday is just a little technicality, but they BAKE everything FRESH on a daily basis.

They just never tell you when they put them in the for-sale case! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

I love watching for word games in advertisements!!

It's like the question, "Do you bake your cakes fresh?" Well, darlin', I don't know HOW to bake stale! icon_confused.gif

The car dealerships who run tv commercials "come in and fill out one of our FREE credit applications!" Gee, you mean some places actually CHARGE you to fill out a credit app? icon_confused.gificon_lol.gif

I sold life insurance for a short time period. When somone would make the statement about "oh, you're just out for the commission you'll get if I buy this!", I'd tell them, "Sweetie, I'm going to get my paycheck this Friday whether you buy this policy or not." Which was true. This Friday, I would get a paycheck covering the commissions I made on the policies I sold LAST week!

A friend of mine used to say, "The last thing I'm going to do is sell you a policy that you don't need." And she would explain to me, "Yep! As soon as they sign the application and give me a check, I'm leaving. So selling that policy was the LAST thing I did while in their home!"

It's all in the marketing, babe!! thumbs_up.gif

kelsiedelizzle Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 3:34am
post #4 of 34

I love both of y'all's replies! (: You're right, it's all in the wording! I just can't imagine how some bakeries can keep up with the demand they have (well...according to the "reality" TV shows) and still have time to bake a new batch every day!

PumpkinTart Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 3:55am
post #5 of 34

I work at a bakery and we do prep some things like cookies and muffins a day or more in advance and either refrigerate or freeze and then pull out what we need each morning and bake it off. Some things are mixed/shaped and baked the same day. It just depends on staffing levels and how well things keep or how certain receipes change with refrigerating/freezing.

For example, we used to mix and bake our ginger molasses cookies the same day. Now, we mix them once a week, scoop them and freeze them. The texture and flavor of the cookie is significantly better after spending time in the freezer than it was after just mixing and baking them.

LindaF144a Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 1:54pm
post #6 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mseif



For example, we used to mix and bake our ginger molasses cookies the same day. Now, we mix them once a week, scoop them and freeze them. The texture and flavor of the cookie is significantly better after spending time in the freezer than it was after just mixing and baking them.




In the book Bakewise by Shirley Corriher she recommends doing this for cookie dough. She and another famous chef (whose name escapes me) did a taste test of cookies that had been refridgerated for 12, 24 and 36 hours. The 36 hours ones tasted the best. I think they said it is because the ingredients have a chance to meld together and create a better flavor.

I also know that Planet Cake in Australia makes their cakes ahead of time and freezes them. They showed a photo of the freezer either in the book or on their blog. They stated that they had to or else they would not be able to keep up with the demand.

ncsmorris Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 4:16pm
post #7 of 34

I don't do very many cakes - the most I have is 2 in one week so at this point I do not freeze them at all. If due on Saturday, I bake Thursday night after work and decorate Friday/Saturday. But after work during the week, I will work on some of the decorations for the upcoming weekend.

kelsiedelizzle Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 2:02am
post #8 of 34

Linda, I just want to say that I BakeWise is an amazing book. I just bought a copy on Amazon and so far I LOVE it icon_biggrin.gif I haven't gotten to the cookies section yet, still reading about cakes. But its full of great information so far!

littlecake Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 5:32am
post #9 of 34

frosting a half thawed cake is tons easier than frosting a fresh cake too.

scp1127 Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 6:53am
post #10 of 34

Thanks, Linda, I just emailed Borders to save me a copy of Bakewise.

kelsiedelizzle Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 8:03pm
post #11 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

Thanks, Linda, I just emailed Borders to save me a copy of Bakewise.




Amazon has it listed for $26, and there's free shipping for orders over $25 icon_biggrin.gif

scp1127 Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 11:13pm
post #12 of 34

I just got my copy of Bakewise from Borders (33% off coupon) and I plan on spending my Friday night with it and a highlighter... thanks again!

kelsiedelizzle Posted 21 Aug 2010 , 12:04am
post #13 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I just got my copy of Bakewise from Borders (33% off coupon) and I plan on spending my Friday night with it and a highlighter... thanks again!




excellent plan! If I was packing to move back to school... I'd join you! icon_smile.gif

sweetonyouzz Posted 21 Aug 2010 , 7:03pm
post #14 of 34

I had 6 wedding cakes this weekend (all now delivered or picked up...th.gd) I usually bake for the week on Sunday to Wednesday. I do bake for last minute orders and ice it right away but I like to chill the cake or even freeze it for a few days as it seems better tasteing.

About the woman who threw the cake because she discovered it was not fresh. We are so lucky to live in NorthAmerica where we have very good lives and if a person is down on their luck there is a social safety net. People are so spoiled and self-centered these days . There is such a 'I am so important' mentality these days. Good manners and social grace has been replaced by foul language and people freaking out and making scenes if they do not get their way. I hate people who give restaurant/bakery/supermarket workers grief...

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 21 Aug 2010 , 9:25pm
post #15 of 34

Contrary to "popular" belief, there are artisan bakeries and cafes that do prepare absolutely everything the morning that they are to be sold. I just sold one such bakery to a young couple in a wine region, who intend to keep the recipes and methods and the artisan mindset. Volume is low, prices are high, and demand is great. They don't have a day old shelf. It's a welcome retreat from the overwhelming flood of crisco products and mix prepared pastries.

sweetonyouzz Posted 21 Aug 2010 , 11:09pm
post #16 of 34

. I worked in bakeries for over 35 years and the majority of our stuff was baked every morning as well. Try decorating a wedding cake that was baked that morning.

sweetonyouzz Posted 21 Aug 2010 , 11:12pm
post #17 of 34

I just do not think there is any excuse for snobbery or rudeness.

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 22 Aug 2010 , 12:29am
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetonyouzz

. I worked in bakeries for over 35 years and the majority of our stuff was baked every morning as well. Try decorating a wedding cake that was baked that morning.




Of course our wedding cakes weren't baked that morning, how silly.
And to address rude and snobby? I'm just tired of seeing people who handcraft their offerings and not take shortcuts poo-pooed by some here. If you don't make everything yourself, that's ok, but it's almost a laughable notion to some that people do it any other way. It's saddening. I'm not starting a debate, it's just an observation. No, not all restaurants have the # to Sysco and GFS on speed dial.

LindaF144a Posted 22 Aug 2010 , 1:33am
post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimmyKakes4Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetonyouzz

. I worked in bakeries for over 35 years and the majority of our stuff was baked every morning as well. Try decorating a wedding cake that was baked that morning.



Of course our wedding cakes weren't baked that morning, how silly.
And to address rude and snobby? I'm just tired of seeing people who handcraft their offerings and not take shortcuts poo-pooed by some here. If you don't make everything yourself, that's ok, but it's almost a laughable notion to some that people do it any other way. It's saddening. I'm not starting a debate, it's just an observation. No, not all restaurants have the # to Sysco and GFS on speed dial.




I for one like the idea of artisan. I didn't find your comment rude, but rather was happy to know that this type of baking still exists.

kansaslaura Posted 22 Aug 2010 , 3:27am
post #20 of 34

I understand advertising and marketing and I probably suck at it because I have a read adversion to word games.

It is or it isn't.

I still vividly remember a conversation I had with a waitress at this cute little off the beaten path place that made cheese and had all kinds of incredible things.

After looking at the menu-

Me: Are your pies homemade? (drooling with anticipation)

Waitress: We bake them all here.

Me to my gf sitting next to me: Ohhh I haven't had homemade blackberry pie in ages!! And the waitress definatly heard my comment...

Me: YUM! I'll take blackberry

....moments later I'm looking down at an obviously commerical made pie and look up at the waitress..

Me: I thought these were homemade.

Waitress: No, I said we baked them here, not we made them here.

I was Pi$$ed. HUGELY PI$$ED!!

Yea, maybe I should have been sharp enough to catch the discrepancy or double-speak, but I was tired from a long day and just wanted a good piece of pie!

Now I border on obnoxious when I'm ordering to be sure my question is actually answered.

scp1127 Posted 22 Aug 2010 , 8:43am
post #21 of 34

I watched this site for a long time before I joined. I too am a baker who makes everything from scratch with the finest ingredients, searching the internet and gourmet stores and sparing no expense.

But I'm sorry, I haven't seen anyone bashing the artisan baker, but just the opposite. Yes, you had a market, but so do they. There is no wrong to any style of baking. Baking style is an opinion, not a fact.

And as to the not-quite-from-scratch recipes and more budget-conscious alternatives offered by cc members, I have tried some of the high ranking ones and they are really good. I now have in my pantry a selection of cake mixes and I can decide to doctor one up at 2am and send my daughter off to school with fresh cupcakes for her homeroom class.

As I have posted before, I used to own my own marketing company. There is room in the baking world for more than one kind of cake! It is very unfair to put down such a large group of bakers. And I will bet that with the experience of many of the bakers on this site, they could bake you and me under the table.

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 22 Aug 2010 , 1:06pm
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

I watched this site for a long time before I joined. I too am a baker who makes everything from scratch with the finest ingredients, searching the internet and gourmet stores and sparing no expense. But I'm sorry, I haven't seen anyone bashing the artisan baker, but just the opposite. Yes, you had a market, but so do they. There is no wrong to any style of baking. Baking style is an opinion, not a fact. And as to the not-quite-from-scratch recipes and more budget-conscious alternatives offered by cc members, I have tried some of the high ranking ones and they are really good. I now have in my pantry a selection of cake mixes and I can decide to doctor one up at 2am and send my daughter off to school with fresh cupcakes for her homeroom class. As I have posted before, I used to own my own marketing company. There is room in the baking world for more than one kind of cake! It is very unfair to put down such a large group of bakers. And I will bet that with the experience of many of the bakers on this site, they could bake you and me under the table.




Then you've been lucky. I don't have a problem with the way anybody bakes, and that's the 2nd time I've made that clear now. icon_rolleyes.gif Trust me, stick around long enough, you'll get some of what I'm talking about. It's not bashing persay, it's the comments along the lines of "no one knows the difference anyways" (Uh, I and a lot of other people can tell, thank you very much" or "I throw extra ingredients into my box mix, therefore it is scratch" (well, no it isn't, and if you care enough to give it the scratch label, then just make it scratch!)

I don't care how people bake, I have packages of Ghiradelli brownies in my pantry right now. They're so delicious. I was merely making an observation about how (against what some profess), not all bakeries out there are using mixes. And not all restaurants get their soup from GFS. thumbs_up.gif

LindaF144a Posted 22 Aug 2010 , 1:58pm
post #23 of 34

I don't care how other people bake either. To me it is not a matter of what you use to get to the end product, but rather what I consume. After a health scare last year I decided that I was going to eat products with healthy ingredients, aka no transfat. I was naive in thinking that if I made it myself, whether box or not, it would healthy. Then I started reading the labels and saw that my beloved box mix and frosting (that we all looove in this family) has transfats. That is when I started baking from scratch and visiting local bakeries. Only the local bakeries have professional mixes that probably have the same transfat, so I am left with my own baking. Thank goodness I get good results.

The only thing I still can't replicate the delicious DH fudge frosting. I keep trying though and someday I will get it. Just yesterday my DD "confessed" to me that she loves the canned fudge frosting. I told her I do too and I am determined to figure out how to make a scratch version. So far I have found about a half a dozen ways to not make it!

I think I got off topic. Sorry.

kelsiedelizzle Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 2:42am
post #24 of 34

I love hearing hearing all these different opinions, because as spc said, there's a market for all kinds of baked goods. When I open my bakery, I'd like to bake everything from scratch...not just for the different taste (because seriously? I love me some Duncan Hines!!) but because I'm a total nerd and I love the science behind it. It's why I'm addicted to Good Eats & just bought BakeWise.

And it *is* possible to bake from scratch and freeze the cake/pastry/dessert for later use, right? I've done this before. To the bakeries out there that bake fresh every morning, I total commend them for having the time and ability to do that. I'm just afraid that in my own bakery, I wouldn't have the time to do that (hypothetically speaking, of course. I'm still in school so who knows where things will take me?). Plus, if you bake every morning, and there's something extra left over at the end of the day, what happens to it? If it gets thrown out, that would hurt my heart. Good food should not go to waste!

And finally, sweetonyouzz, I baked a cake once that I iced only a few hours after taking out of the oven. It promptly collapsed into a puddle of icing and crumbs, and then *I* collapsed into a puddle of tears. icon_razz.gif I can't imagine baking a wedding cake the same day as delivery. Plus, don't wedding cakes sometimes take hours/days to decorate?? Once they have the icing/fondant coating, they stay fresh, too?

Well, I'm done rambling for right now! icon_razz.gif

Kitagrl Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 2:58am
post #25 of 34

I figure as long as the customer is happy!!!

I posted a couple weeks ago...but I have a YUMMMMM scratch chocolate recipe and then a doctored box chocolate. I generally end up using the box chocolate when its for a kids party, or someone who just wants "chocolate and vanilla", etc. And the scratch chocolate more for weddings or whatever...I market them as "rich chocolate fudge" or "bakery style chocolate".

For the first time I had a customer request to try BOTH. They requested the scratch one with raspberry filling and the doctored box with chocolate ganache.

Now both cakes taste good to me...and I would have preferred anything with ganache anyway haha but sure enough, she chose the box mix!!!! Now I personally totally prefer the scratch...its a bit denser and richer and just yummyyyyy! But there is a very large customer base who just likes a fluffy....well, "bakery style" aka box mix and then if you doctor a box mix and get it nice and moist and then put that homemade buttercream on it and the butter kinda seeps into the cake...it tastes REALLY good. And customers are pleased as punch.

And of course for those who want an "artisan" cake, I have those too. icon_smile.gif

But I find most customers are just as pleased with a nice moist doctored yellow cake as anything. Fine with me...they're happy, and it didn't take as much work to make!

jlsheik Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 3:15am
post #26 of 34

I love how a topic gets completely off track....caketeen09 I have my own cake shop...we are open Wednesday- Sat and we start baking on Wed morning and all extras go straight to the freezer. I bake all my cookies on Wednesday morning and into the freezer they go. My customers know, that it will taste fabulous either way....I actually prefer to have a cupcake out of the freezer.

Now, everything must go by Sat. What we don't sale, eat, give away...or donate must go!! And, police, domestic abuse safe houses and other people will take off it off your hands and that is great advertising.
I have to add....nothing is allowed in the freezer but cookies, cupcakes and cake. No exceptions.

And, there is NO way I could bake everyday...fresh for the day, ever!!!
Happy baking....and if it's from scratch or from a box...make it fabulous.
Laura

Kitagrl Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 3:18am
post #27 of 34

I made an extra round of pumpkin cake the other day and just iced it fresh for my family and threw the customer one in the fridge...

My husband actually was slightly disappointed it was "baked fresh"...he said he liked the taste of it after it had been frozen and thawed, because it was more moist and dense.

cheeseball Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 4:05am
post #28 of 34

I like that carefully worded ad stuff icon_lol.gif

I just don't get when some places feel the need to pretend that they don't ever freeze anything. I just flashed back to my first week as an apprentice at the most exclusive bake shop in the city. One of the guys takes a sheet pan of muffins out of the freezer and plops them on top of the wall oven to thaw and warm up, winks at me and goes, "Fresh off the oven!"

KimmyKakes4Me Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 4:18am
post #29 of 34

Uh, cause sometimes people DON'T freaking freeze things, seriously, some of us don't!

Vanaya Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 6:02am
post #30 of 34

I debated asking this question cause I feel like an idiot for not knowing. I tried to Google for the answer but I didn't find what I was looking for.

My question is, What are Artisan Cakes?

Thanks in advance icon_smile.gif

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