How Far Ahead Should I Make The Cake Bfore It Goes Bad?

Decorating By tristansmama Updated 15 Sep 2010 , 1:35pm by leily

tristansmama Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 4:13pm
post #1 of 13

I am just starting up my business. And I've been making cakes for quite a while. But I've always made them the day before or the day of. Now that I'm getting more oders I need to start making them a head of time. How far ahead can I make the cake without it drying out? Any suggestions? How do you all handle alot of oders at once?

Thanks
Brittney

12 replies
elliespartycake Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 4:41pm
post #2 of 13

It's called a freezer. Bake a week or two ahead, cool, wrap very well in plastic wrap (2 or 3 layers of wrap) and freeze. I usually level and tort before I freeze. When ready to decorate remove from freezer and begin. I find cakes are even more moist when frozen.

thumbs Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 5:03pm
post #3 of 13

I freeze my cakes as well. I try to take a Monday at the beginning of the month as bake as many cakes as I can for that month. Then I can spend the rest of the time decorating.

I bake, cool, wrap up really good and freeze. Remove from freezer the morning I want to start, let the cake defrost fully while still wrapped. Then you are good to go icon_biggrin.gif

I always get compliments on how moist my cakes are so it doesn't hurt them at all. I also find it makes them settle better so I don't have druppy sides.

tristansmama Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 5:08pm
post #4 of 13

Thanks Ladies!! Good to know that freezing improves the cakes!!! You've made my day!! No more rushing!!!WOOHOOO!!!

Sweet_Toof Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 2:50am
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by thumbs

I freeze my cakes as well. I try to take a Monday at the beginning of the month as bake as many cakes as I can for that month. Then I can spend the rest of the time decorating.

I bake, cool, wrap up really good and freeze. Remove from freezer the morning I want to start, let the cake defrost fully while still wrapped. Then you are good to go icon_biggrin.gif

I always get compliments on how moist my cakes are so it doesn't hurt them at all. I also find it makes them settle better so I don't have druppy sides.





Just wondering why you defrost your cakes still wrapped up?

emrldsky Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 10:18am
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Toof

Quote:
Originally Posted by thumbs

I freeze my cakes as well. I try to take a Monday at the beginning of the month as bake as many cakes as I can for that month. Then I can spend the rest of the time decorating.

I bake, cool, wrap up really good and freeze. Remove from freezer the morning I want to start, let the cake defrost fully while still wrapped. Then you are good to go icon_biggrin.gif

I always get compliments on how moist my cakes are so it doesn't hurt them at all. I also find it makes them settle better so I don't have druppy sides.




Just wondering why you defrost your cakes still wrapped up?




You run the risk of having the cakes dry out if they're not still wrapped up while defrosting, because the moisture is evaporating into the air, instead of being reabsorbed in the cake. *shrug*

Also, indydebi has a great theory on why this works best for cakes: why would you want to lose that moisture?

She also recommends putting the cakes in the freezer when they're still fairly warm, because steam is moisture and it's just leaving the cake!

Sweet_Toof Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 11:12am
post #7 of 13

Interesting... Does anyone else freeze their cakes whilst still a bit warm?
Thinking bout trying it.... I thought slower cooling would be better... I wouldn't know though

TexasSugar Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 2:07pm
post #8 of 13

If you don't want to freeze you can start baking on Wed/Thrus for a Saturday cake.

flamingobaker Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 2:51pm
post #9 of 13

I generally wrap my cakes to freeze while they are still warmish.

I learned to keep it wrapped to defrost because then the condensation forms on the wrap instead of the cake. Condensation on cake = soggy. And it makes sense that it keeps any moisture in the cake IN the cake.

thumbs Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 4:10pm
post #10 of 13

Yes, they stay wrapped until they are completely defrosted.

I also put them in the freeze while they are still warm....not hot but just a little warm to touch. It also makes the wrap stick to it better so you don't get air in it.

Sweet_Toof Posted 14 Sep 2010 , 2:47am
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by thumbs

Yes, they stay wrapped until they are completely defrosted.

I also put them in the freeze while they are still warm....not hot but just a little warm to touch. It also makes the wrap stick to it better so you don't get air in it.





I froze my cake a bit warm - maybe a bit too warm.... when I took it out the following week, the middle had caved in... I'm not sure if it was my recipe or the temperature shock. The cake naturally doesn't rise a lot, and it rises even (without the big hump in the top middle).
Nevertheless it tasted great, but I'm not sure what I should do in the future?....
Also, I froze it still in the cake pan just so it would keep its shape and nothing in the freezer would knock it

uniquecreations Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 1:28pm
post #12 of 13

I just took a cake out of the freezer that was frozen for a month and it is still just as moist and delicious as the day I baked it!!!!!

leily Posted 15 Sep 2010 , 1:35pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by uniquecreations

I just took a cake out of the freezer that was frozen for a month and it is still just as moist and delicious as the day I baked it!!!!!




I've taken them out about 4-5 months later and the same results. As long as you wrap it and store it correctly it will last a year.

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