Smooth Royal Icing

Decorating By Sarah1986 Updated 20 Aug 2010 , 5:53am by Goldberry

Sarah1986 Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 4:04pm
post #1 of 7

Can someone advise me on how i can get royal icing as smooth as i can!!!

Thanks

6 replies
thatslifeca Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 4:24pm
post #2 of 7

When you are asking about smooth RI, do you mean on a cake? If so, then this is what I do. I place a some icing on the top and spread it like BC icing, then I have a long metal ruler that I hold across the cake and slowly and evenly pull towards me. I then do the sides just like I would do BC. You let that dry, and do it again till you have a nice clean even covered cake. I cover my cakes in marzipan and make sure everything is nice and dry. I usualy use 1/4 thickness till I get to were I want it. I don't ever have to do it more then twice. You can start of thinner if you like and just keep adding till your nice and smooth all over. icon_biggrin.gif hope that helps.

Goldberry Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 11:11am
post #3 of 7

OK the best way to get RI as smooth as possible is to paddle it on your worksurface first, until it looks glossy. This has taken out most of the air from it. Then pop it on the cake with a pallet knife. Use a rule to run it over the top or a scraper for the side(s)

on the top of the cake think plastering. don't be afraid to use BOTH edges of the rule and to run it backwards and forwards over the cake until the RI is looking smooth pull off with a straight movement. Leave it to dry

for a round cake paddle the RI on the work surface, pop onto the cake and then in a smooth movement on a turntable hold the scraper at an straight angle and move the turntable around in a single movement -

Square hexagon cakes to alternative sides, let to dry and do other sides.

This is the way that Eddie Spence does RI

oh and don'tforget the glycerine!! icon_smile.gif

anoldhippy Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 6:21pm
post #4 of 7

Why the glycerin?

Goldberry Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 8:29pm
post #5 of 7

when you cover a cake with Royal icing the glycerine makes the icing softer, so that it will cut more easily. when piping etc don't use it

anoldhippy Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 9:39pm
post #6 of 7

Thank you so much. Learned something else new today!

Goldberry Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 5:53am
post #7 of 7

Any time

if you look for the book by Eddie Spence it will tell you these things. Eddie is an amazing man, who's 78 now. He's my tutor but has been Royal Icing for over 60 years. His book is brilliant and gives you loads of information

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