Best Way Of Adhearing Cascading Flowers On Cake?

Decorating By BethLS Updated 19 Aug 2010 , 6:29am by Cakepro

BethLS Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 12:34pm
post #1 of 12

Hello lovely CC'ers! Good morning icon_smile.gif

I have a question for you concerning a stacked three-tier (14 10 6) I am doing next weekend.

I will be assembling and adhearing the flowers to it AT the venue. (I dont have SPS and I am too leery of going the traditional route of dowels for this one)

So, below is an example of the cake Im doing (there will be a ribbon border instead of icing for one) and I am concerned on how to actually attach these flowers. Bride really wants flowers to be completely edible, either out of fondant (wont these be too heavy?) or royal.

So, two questions. What MEDIUM do I do these roses in, fondant or royal?

And how do I attach them to the cake? More royal? And if so, since it will be done on site of the reception, how long will it take for each rose to "set" so I wont have drooping or falling worries?

Thanks in advance for the help!

11 replies
pattigunter Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 12:56pm
post #3 of 12

I used melted candy melts. Its a very good adheasive. If your flowers are on wires or sticks you can dip that in the melted candy and then insert into the cake.

cutthecake Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 1:06pm
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BethLS

I dont have SPS and I am too leery of going the traditional route of dowels for this one!




I dodn't understand something. Aren't you using any support system?

BethLS Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 1:19pm
post #5 of 12

Lol yes I am using a support system...I just dont want to have to rely on it while driving a couple hours away in this dreaded heat. icon_wink.gif So, it will be dowelled (sp?) but will be stacked at venue.

I never thought to use candy melting chocolate...super!

I did do a search for this topic and found Debi uses her BC roses and BC to attach...I really like that idea! I love my buttercream! icon_biggrin.gif

Will wait to see what others say before I make a decision icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 1:27pm
post #6 of 12

I'm completely confused. You're using a support system, dowels, but don't want to rely on it?

Loucinda Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 1:41pm
post #7 of 12

Start at the bottom and work your way up for attaching the roses. That way the ones on the bottom help support the ones above as you go.

Loucinda Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 1:42pm
post #8 of 12

Start at the bottom and work your way up for attaching the roses. That way the ones on the bottom help support the ones above as you go.

Unlimited Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 1:46pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BethLS

I am concerned on how to actually attach these flowers. Bride really wants flowers to be completely edible, either out of fondant (wont these be too heavy?) or royal.




I don't make roses with royal icing... don't want anyone to break a tooth! I make them with buttercream. If you make them in advance, they'll air dry and you won't need to worry about them drooping, melting, or falling.

They'll also be easier to handle when dried which will allow you to place them where they need to go. You can stack them upon one another, starting your cascade from the bottom and building your way upward. No need to attach them with anything other than buttercream or leaves.

BethLS Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 1:55pm
post #10 of 12

Thanks everyone,

Definately will be using buttercream. I come from a place where you use freshly made roses right away (high volumn store) and never once thought about air-drying.

Leah, yes I am using support, but there is something inside me that is screaming to assemble this cake on location. Ive delivered many stacked assembled cakes but my gut is telling me something on this cake!

aleverin Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 2:35pm
post #11 of 12

I would recommend making fondant roses on toothpicks and then you just insert the toothpick into the cake. The toothpicks can be taken out of the roses if you want to serve the flowers with a piece of cake.

Cakepro Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 6:29am
post #12 of 12

The real question is how much were you paid for the cake, because doing the roses in BC or RI will take 15 minutes to pipe, vs fondant roses, which will take hours.

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