Anyone A Writer? Good Presenter? I Need Help.

Decorating By Dreme Updated 20 Aug 2010 , 3:15pm by indydebi

Dreme Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 3:17pm
post #1 of 9

Anyone a writer or know where to find help on writing?

I am not a writer. I struggle with writing content for anything and it takes me hours to complete something. Right now i'm trying to write a sales letter to include in my promo packages. I'm just stressing out because I don't have time to play around writing when there are a million of other things I could be doing with my business.

Another thing I need is some advice on presenting myself/business in public. I would like to go out and physically market myself but I find it hard to just go up to people and talk (specifically other businesses). How do I go into a business and give them my promo package without looking like an idiot? I am starting to think people will look at me like i'm crazy and that doing this is not a good idea. That even if my product looks good, nobody will be interested because of me or my prices.

Feeling pitiful.

8 replies
cakesdivine Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 3:34pm
post #2 of 9

One thing I can say is if you have a community college in your area, or a continueing education center, take a speech class. The knowledge and confidence you will obtain will eventually pay off in regard to your bottom line.

As far as networking and soliciting local businesses, make sure that you call and set an appointment first. Many corporations have a community relations department. Start there. Most businesses, large and small, have it clearly marked on their entry doors a "no solicitation" statement, so they will not look kindly on you just dropping in to leave product or information about your business. Find a local wedding vendors organization and become a member. This will give you instant networking opportunities with others in the event/wedding industry.

You can always use email, but you have to be careful because some words used in sales letters can cause your email to end up in their spam folder, and not everyone looks at their spam before deleting. A nice letter introducing yourself and business, along with a first time customer's discount sent via snail mail to the appropriate department can do wonders. You will have to research each company that you wish to solicit to find out who handles their community relations or event planning, then send your information directly to their attention.

If you like you can PM me your ideas and I can lend you a hand in the writing department. I do all my own marketing for my 3 businesses.

KJ62798 Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 3:42pm
post #3 of 9

From a writing standpoint--you need to start getting ideas & info on paper, even in a raw form. Every writing project starts with a rough draft and sometimes taking that step is the hardest.

Make a list of questions that you think a client would want answered and then answer them.

What is your "mission" as a baker? To create unique custom cakes? to provide quality product at an affordable price? You need to define yourself to the public so that they think of you, not someone else.

Once you start to get the text of your presentation, find a non-biased editor. Nothing screams unprofessional like typos and bad grammer. Check w/a local community college or even look up your fave English teacher from school. Having a fresh set of eyes look at your work will help pull it together.

Find a publishing program that works for you--I've used the Broderbund Print Shop family of software for years. It's simple & cheap but you can get more expensive & complicated programs. Office has basic publishing.

Good luck

Kristy

ycknits Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 3:46pm
post #4 of 9

As a young professional I used to nearly die when I had to stand up and present, or sell anything to anyone. My best advice is to practice lots. Eventually you learn that - even when you don't do a top-notch performance - you will not die :>) Learn what you can from each experience and work it into the next. Over the years, I learned how to pump-up my introverted self for a performance.... until I could almost do it automatically. I played "Hiway to the Danger Zone" in my head and donned my black cape with a bright red lining in my mind. (I learned that by role playing in a speech class while we marched around the auditorium doing our own things in our heads :>)

Make a list of your key selling points and say them out-loud until you can list them without looking and until you can talk to each point without thinking about how you're going to say what you want to communicate. Then practice on family members, friends, anyone who will listen. They're the toughest audience of all, because they'll give you feedback and criticism - all REALLY valuable.

Then practice in a real situation and remember that you won't die. Your knowledge and enthusiasm will help you communicate what you need to. Remember that you know more than the people that you're talking to. Work to focus on what they're saying/asking - and just have a real conversation. You'll learn to be comfortable and will do great!! Your road to improvement begins when you begin. Good luck :>)

cakesdivine Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 4:02pm
post #5 of 9

Dreme, your cakes and cookies are amazing! Your talent truly will speak for itself!

sodramafree Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 4:29pm
post #6 of 9

I am a student in my city's local university... I have taken marketing classes as well as web design classes... We have several local business small and mid-sized come to the univ. and post "Wanted" flyers. For example, if you are looking for a technical/creative writer or someone with marketing skills... make an ad for it and put it out there. Most students will jump at the chance to build their portfolio and get good letters of reccomendations. Just a thought! Good Luck

scp1127 Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 6:39am
post #7 of 9

I was a full commissioned salesperson for twenty years (now a SAHM). I cold called businesses all day long successfully. Here are some tips:
Businesses can be called on by numerous salespeople every day. There may be twenty people in their door trying to sell them something. They are used to it. BUT... they didn't bring cake! People are going to give you some attention if you bring them samples. Be nice to the receptionist... she is the gatekeeper. Tell them briefly what you do and then start asking questions about them. People like to talk, not listen. After you listen, apply your business to them, showing how your business would benefit their business. As far as how to get your nerve up, do what the pros do. Make a list of the businesses you would like to contact with the most important ones for you at the top. Then start at the bottom. Perfect you sales pitch and your confidence on the ones least likely to benefit you, for example, a little real estate office. When you are more sure of yourself, go for the businesses you really want.

scp1127 Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 6:40am
post #8 of 9

I was a full commissioned salesperson for twenty years (now a SAHM). I cold called businesses all day long successfully. Here are some tips:
Businesses can be called on by numerous salespeople every day. There may be twenty people in their door trying to sell them something. They are used to it. BUT... they didn't bring cake! People are going to give you some attention if you bring them samples. Be nice to the receptionist... she is the gatekeeper. Tell them briefly what you do and then start asking questions about them. People like to talk, not listen. After you listen, apply your business to them, showing how your business would benefit their business. As far as how to get your nerve up, do what the pros do. Make a list of the businesses you would like to contact with the most important ones for you at the top. Then start at the bottom. Perfect you sales pitch and your confidence on the ones least likely to benefit you, for example, a little real estate office. When you are more sure of yourself, go for the businesses you really want.

indydebi Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 3:15pm
post #9 of 9

I'm happy to help. I've written my own sales material and I've also been paid to write campaign materials for politicians. Email me (not PM) the material you have and I'll be glad to look it over and work with you.

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