Wrapping A Cake In Fondant Rather Than Chocolate

Decorating By susgene Updated 18 Aug 2010 , 12:57am by susgene

susgene Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 2:13am
post #1 of 8

A client has chosen a cake that is first covered in fondant and then it's wrapped in fondant like some cakes are wrapped in chocolate.

How do you get it to stand up slightly around the top of the cake? Won't it just droop?

Thanks!

7 replies
G_Cakes Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 2:31am
post #2 of 8

Never heard of that before...bit when you say chocolaye do you mean modeling chocolate? or actual chocolate ?

susgene Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 2:34am
post #3 of 8

I had never seen this before either.

I'm talking about chocolate that you melt and put on plastic and wrap around the cake, let cool and then take the plastic off (not modelling chocolate).

I wish I had the photo that she showed me... I've been trying to find an example.

Bluehue Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 2:35am
post #4 of 8

susgene - lolllll, don't you love customers that push us to use our imagination thumbs_up.gificon_wink.gif
After rolling out your fondant and cutting it to size - allow it to sit for a good 5 - 8 minutes to *firm* up a bit.
Then rolling it up (as you would a belt) - roll it out around the already covered cake.
THENNNNN with a roll of paper towell at the ready - wrap and wrap and wrap the paper towell around the cake to add support. I had to do a *standing up outter layer* of fondant once and this method worked for me.

I used the plain paper towell so as not to get any impression from it.
Wrapping securley - but not tightly...
Left the cake wrapped in the paper towell for about 1.5 hours - and Voula -
all was good after i removed it -

HTH

Bluehue.

susgene Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 2:42am
post #5 of 8

I'm just happy to not be making another wedding cake with a ribbon and little dots! They are pretty but I needed something different for a change... and this is definitely different.

Thanks so much for the instructions! I can't wait to try it!

Bluehue Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 2:58am
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by susgene

I'm just happy to not be making another wedding cake with a ribbon and little dots! They are pretty but I needed something different for a change... and this is definitely different.

Thanks so much for the instructions! I can't wait to try it!




icon_redface.gificon_rolleyes.gif Sorry but i forgot to add -
As soon as you have wrapped the cake in Paper Towell - tear off another good length of it - scrunch it up and place that on the inside of the *standing up outter layer*
This helps prevent it from caving inwards.... again, sorry - should have written that in my first post.

Also - i left my covered cake sit for 24 hours before i did the *standing up outter layer* so that way it ws dry, firm and supportive enough to hold the next outter layer.


Bluehue

hsmomma Posted 17 Aug 2010 , 3:12pm
post #7 of 8

I've done it a few times...the cake in my avatar is done by wrapping the fondant. That way the edge of it is up above the cake. But, I don't cover mine with fondant first. I roll out fondant to cover the top of the cake and then wrap the fondant around my buttercreamed cake. If the buttercream is still "wet" then it sticks just fine. If not, you can finely mist your buttercream with water (very finely). Then wrap.
I roll my fondant out just like I would if I were making a fondant ribbon (except much wider to cover the sides of the cake). Then I wrap it around the cake using some pressure to seal it to the buttercream. Once it is on, I put rolled papertowels all around the edge so the part sticking up over the cake doesn't lean in/droop in. Once it is dried, then I take the papertowel off. Once it is dry, you won't have a problem with it drooping. I have a cake dummy I did like this a year ago that is still in my studio.

On another note...It would be easy to cover a cake in fondant, then wet the fondant a bit before wrapping the next layer of fondant around the sides. It would seal well together. I would just cover the cake in the thinnest fondant that would hold it...because I can't imagine cutting through 2 layers of fondant when serving the cake. Just personal opinion...I don't think two layers is necessary when the same look can be achieved without covering the cake in fondant first.
ps. the pic in my avatar is also in my pictures if you want to see it enlarged.

susgene Posted 18 Aug 2010 , 12:57am
post #8 of 8

Thanks so much BlueHue and hsmomma! Puts my mind at ease and now I can't wait to try it!

hsmomma - the beautiful cake in your avatar is very similar to the photo my client showed me... mainly just different colors and flowers. You did a wonderful job on it!

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