Calling All Cupcakers!need Help Before Multiplying A Recipe

Baking By Suzisweet Updated 20 Aug 2010 , 2:38pm by sweet_honesty

Suzisweet Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 1:18am
post #1 of 16

Just wondering if anyone has advice on multiplying a recipe for cupcakes. I am making 200 spice and 200 vanilla cupcakes .
I will be doing this particular project out of a relatives commercial kitchen which has a 20 quart mixer.
I am caculating that I will need to multiply my recipe by nine for each flavor. My concern however, since I have never baked this large quantity at once, is will it work properly??? I have heard horror stories of people multiplying even 3 times and having things fail. I really do not want to waste money on a test run of this size but again how in the world do I know if it will work???
Any thoughts, suggestions or help of any kind will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Suzi

15 replies
cabecakes Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 1:48am
post #2 of 16

I multiply by 3 all the time. I would think as long as your measurements of ingredients are accurate there wouldn't be a problem. Your just mixing in a larger batch. I would calculate and re-calculate measurement amounts and measure and re-measure ingredients to ensure that everything went in accurately, and if you do this, it should come out the same as mixing it one batch at a time.

Suzisweet Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 3:41am
post #3 of 16

Thanks cabe cakes! I guess I am a little nervous. I know in theory it should work but the baking soda/powder is what has me concerned.

Hoping I might find cupcakers out there that have made large batches of batter (over 100) and that their recipes have worked as well. Just a couple of other yeses and I'll feel better.
Thanks again!
Suzi

scp1127 Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 8:02am
post #4 of 16

I have made 120 as my largest batch. The problem with recipes not working is that slight measurement inaccuracies become big ones in multiple batches. Because of this, I use a digital scale. It is a great investment, not only for the accuracy, but for the lack of cleanup. I can spoon my flour or sugar in a big bowl instead of a measuring cup.

LindaF144a Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 2:37pm
post #5 of 16

I definitely would be concerned about the leavening. And I also agree that weighing is the best thing to do.

I do a algebra equation that is quite simple to multiply it out. I do it a little backwards probably, but it works. I take the yield of cupcakes I get in a single batch and then find out how much more I need to make to get the number of cupcakes I need. For instance if I get 24 cupcakes out of say 10 ounces of flour then the equation is 10/24 = n/200. This then become 10 x 200 = n24, which comes out to 2,000 = n24. Then you divide 2,000 by 24 and you get 83.33. So I would need 83.33 (or 83.375 due to my kind of weight scale) to get 200 cupcakes. I do this for the first few ingredients, including the leavening agents and i get the same as I would by just tripling all the ingredients, I'm good. Otherwise I do it for all the ingredients.

Then after that I would evaluate the leavening agents. This is where it is part science and part intuition. I usually look at the ratio in the original recipe. Say as an example, the leavening was equivalent to leavening 3 cups of flour and now I am doing it times 9. Does the new leavening amount now equivalent to 27 cups of flour and I have 9 cups? Then it should be good. But if that still seams large, then this is where intuition comes in and I might lower it as long as I don't lower it below the total amount of flour I have.

But now as I write this, if the leavening is over leavened in the first place - and sometimes this is done to act as a tenderizer too, so it might not be off - then you can practice lowering it in a single batch and see what you get.

Good luck and I hope I didn't confuse you.

Yep, math and spreadsheets are what I use for baking. My kids are amazed.

sweet_honesty Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 3:15pm
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144

I definitely would be concerned about the leavening.





Would this really be a concern for cupcakes? I could understand the concern if you were doing a multiple of a recipe in order to make a larger cake but you are just making many more cakes of a same size.... just a thought.

When doubling recipes I am more concerned about the mixing method myself.

For example, if I have a recipe that calls for 5 eggs, adding each one at a time, if I double that recipe I add the eggs two at a time so as not to be mixing too long and overwork the flour.

I always worry about overmixing larger batches.

Suzisweet Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 4:26pm
post #7 of 16

Wow! Thanks all, for great information.

I will be weighing. I actually weigh 90% of the time with cakes not so much for accuracey but for my "laziness factor", its just WAY FASTER and not as messy when using things like shortening!!

I really hadn't given much thought as to a couple of things if NOT weighing as that the little errors become big errors because of the quantity of the items being measured over and over. This makes complete sense. I just never thought about it like that.

I have always wondered too, why some people put notations on recipes that say something like "this does not double well" etc.
I guess things like that had me a little nervous.

I love the little math conversion as well and I will consider using that along side of the weighing ingrdients.

This event does not occur until the first week of October but it has been weighing heavy on me as how to tackle this in the most efficient way. As I also have to do 400 cake truffels and a small tiered cake for the cutting ceremony (a 4 & 6 with tiny top being their anniverssary tier) My Mom and Aunt have offered to help (thank goodness) so that will be nice.
Thanks again for such great feedback.
Suzi icon_biggrin.gif

Suzisweet Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 4:31pm
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty


For example, if I have a recipe that calls for 5 eggs, adding each one at a time, if I double that recipe I add the eggs two at a time so as not to be mixing too long and overwork the flour.

I always worry about overmixing larger batches.




Forgot to mention that the above is such a great thing to keep in mind too (taking notes on all of these suggestions). I will definately be doing this. I have learned over the years that the mixing method and time can greatly change the outcome!!

Dayti Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 4:34pm
post #9 of 16

I hope your relative has a lot of counter space in their kitchen - you are going to need it to decorate all those cupcakes and dip all those cake truffles! Good luck, its an exciting project icon_smile.gif

Suzisweet Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 5:24pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti

I hope your relative has a lot of counter space in their kitchen - you are going to need it to decorate all those cupcakes and dip all those cake truffles! Good luck, its an exciting project icon_smile.gif




I will be doing all of this at my Aunts restuarant. She has several large ovens, large mixer, walk in freezer, racks, sheeter, ect. and she is closed Sunday- Tuesday (that is when we will do most of the work...then into the freezer!)I will ice them the evening before the wedding (as I am attending) 200 will be iced and drizzeled with caramel, the other 200 I "spin ice on a converted pottery wheel" and it goes so fast. One of us will ice the other puts the cuppies in the holder and then removes them when done being iced. I am hoping that this will all go smoothly. It should be a spectacular experience and hope I can keep the nerves at bay. icon_biggrin.gif

Sweet_Toof Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 3:24am
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144

I definitely would be concerned about the leavening.




Would this really be a concern for cupcakes? I could understand the concern if you were doing a multiple of a recipe in order to make a larger cake but you are just making many more cakes of a same size.... just a thought.

When doubling recipes I am more concerned about the mixing method myself.

For example, if I have a recipe that calls for 5 eggs, adding each one at a time, if I double that recipe I add the eggs two at a time so as not to be mixing too long and overwork the flour.

I always worry about overmixing larger batches.




This is the ONLY thing that I thought would be a concern with using a double, triple, etc batch - the mixing times - when it says "blend/ beat for _ minutes"
Can anyone give me an indication of if it should be more or less - and by how much, when doing even just a double batch ?
Cheers icon_smile.gif

scp1127 Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 7:03am
post #12 of 16

After reading several baking textbooks, I invested in calibrated measuring spoons. I have All-Clad. Cheap measuring spoons may not be accurate and could throw off a multiplied recipe when measuring leaveners.

Suzisweet Posted 19 Aug 2010 , 12:00pm
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

After reading several baking textbooks, I invested in calibrated measuring spoons. I have All-Clad. Cheap measuring spoons may not be accurate and could throw off a multiplied recipe when measuring leaveners.




Thanks! I'll have to look into those.
Suzi

Lita829 Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 3:13am
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by scp1127

After reading several baking textbooks, I invested in calibrated measuring spoons. I have All-Clad. Cheap measuring spoons may not be accurate and could throw off a multiplied recipe when measuring leaveners.




I also have All-Clad measuring cups and spoons and I have to agree with scp1127. They are far more accurate than the cheap measuring cups and spoons.

When I double or triple a recipe...I really don't time the creaming process (if there is one...opposed to emulsification). I just watch the butter and sugar while creaming and when it looks "light and fluffy" I know that it has been creamed enough. I sometimes will put a small amount on my finger to test how well incorporated the sugar and butter are.

As far as the addition of eggs...If the doubled recipe calls for more than 6 eggs, I'll sometimes add them 2 at a time and beat until just combined.

HTH

scp1127 Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 7:08am
post #15 of 16

I have the All Clad measuring cups too. With all of the money we put into ingredients, they are such a good investment and they will last longer than we will.

sweet_honesty Posted 20 Aug 2010 , 2:38pm
post #16 of 16

There are some dump and stir type recipes where you add everything to the bowl and beat for a given amount of time. I have tried a few of those and truthfully the time thing is what turned me off of them. When I doubled I never knew how long I should beat it for. Sometimes I would overbeat other times I would underbeat and I just got tired of the many iterations trying to find the perfect time.

I now use recipes that call for creaming so I have more control over the final product.

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