Icing A 5" Round...i Give Up!

Decorating By karenm0712 Updated 15 Aug 2010 , 1:49pm by karenm0712

karenm0712 Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 12:23pm
post #1 of 15

This is the 3rd time that I have iced a 5" round cake (4" high) and it gets the best of me every time! The darn cake seems to always shift on me even with a heavy damn. icon_sad.gif My only guess could be that it is almost as tall as it is wide? I like to offer small tiered cakes to my customers (8 & 5) but if I continue to have this issue I am going to rethink and offer a 6" as my smallest "top" tier!

Thoughts anyone?

14 replies
southernswthrt Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 12:34pm
post #2 of 15

I tried this once and experienced the same thing! I haven't tried again, but I think if I do, I will put 2 straws or dowels in it to see if that will stop the shifting!

Irish245 Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 12:36pm
post #3 of 15

I hate icing smaller cakes. My smallest are 6 inch. Because they are so lightweight, they don't spin correctly so I end up having to always hold them in my left hand and ice in my right. It's hard for me to get a clean look that way so it's just dumb luck when it works perfectly. I think the only think that helps me is I put on a crumb coat then wait about an hour for things to settle and firm up before I do the second coat.

keystone Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 1:01pm
post #4 of 15

I also do an 8/5. I put the 5 on a cardboard circle then put the cake and circle on a mat. I don't have any problems with 5 or 4.

karenm0712 Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 2:23pm
post #5 of 15

Glad I am not the only one with problems!

southernswthrt - good thought! I just might have to try that.

Irish245 - I crumb coat and let settle too...hasn't helped yet! icon_sad.gif

keystone - that is exactly what I did but it still shifted on me... icon_sad.gif

I have some extra cakes in the freezer that I just might have to play around with! I like that I can offer a small tiered cake to my customers - it allows them to afford something other than a single tier or sheet cake!

alemicayo Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 10:25pm
post #6 of 15

I dont have any problems with 5'' cakes.. are you icing assembled or disassembled?

if disassembled, I just stick a piece of masking tape between the cake board and the turn table..

just dont push on it too hard!

Irish245 Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 10:44pm
post #7 of 15

duh.....don't know why I didn't think of that - I have no-skid all over my house.....and tape...and teeny glue dots....etc.

kansaslaura Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 10:45pm
post #8 of 15

I use the non-skid shelf liner between the cake and the turntable. That helps A LOT! Also use non-skid liner in the back of the van for deliveries.

juledcakes Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 12:16am
post #9 of 15

fill your cake pop in the freezer for about 15 min take out crumb coat pop in fridge for about 15 min than frost. I also use the non skid mat between my cake board and the turntable

chubbyalaskagriz Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 12:30am
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by juledcakes

fill your cake pop in the freezer for about 15 min take out crumb coat pop in fridge for about 15 min than frost. I also use the non skid mat between my cake board and the turntable




This method works well for me too. I simply fill and freeze the 5" tier, pull it out once it's solid and stable, then crumb-coat, re-freeze 20-30 minutes, then final-coat and it makes it much easier to handle.

millermom Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 12:33am
post #11 of 15

When I did one of the "mug of coffee" cakes, I was having that problem, so I got a sish ka bob skewer and put it down through the center. I iced it all the way up to the skewer, and then pulled it out. When I smoothed the frosting, I just smoothed that part over, and then added the "coffee." But you could also put a decoration there.

dguerrant Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 1:11am
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by juledcakes

fill your cake pop in the freezer for about 15 min take out crumb coat pop in fridge for about 15 min than frost. I also use the non skid mat between my cake board and the turntable




that's exactly what i do, except i squirt some icing on the board, then blob some on another larger board (helps keep things in place) and stick the 2 together and put the first chilled cake on top and pop in the freezer to stick everything together. I then bring it out, put it on a nonskid pad, dam it, fill it, place on the next cake, and stick it all back in the freezer to chill. then crumb coat, chill, and finish coat the cake. When done, slide a warm spatula between the two boards toseperate. I wipe off the board and reuse it (waxed/coated).

Irish245 Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 1:16am
post #13 of 15

oh I have that non skid in my car all the time!!! love that stuff!!! just never thought to use it like that....I reiterate...duh lol

tokazodo Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 1:19am
post #14 of 15

I learned a new trick to help with those pesky little 4 and 5 inchers.

Ice the bugger upside down!
Place a piece of wax paper on the turntable, On the wax paper, smear some buttercream, enough to be the top icing of your cake.
Stack your cake on and ice the sides, but not the new top. You will invert this cake and the top will become the bottom.
Place in the freezer until the icing firms (10 minutes?)
Removed and invert onto cake circle, and smooth as you normally would.

I had asked someone how they got their edges so crisp and she told me this trick. I like using this for those small layers. They don't wander around so much when you do it this way.

I hope this helps,
tokazodo

karenm0712 Posted 15 Aug 2010 , 1:49pm
post #15 of 15

Thanks for all of the tips!!! I am going to try this again and see if I can get my wobbly 5"'ers to stay put! icon_wink.gif

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