"oh My Aching.." While Making Fondant/gumpaste Dec

Decorating By Jynuine Updated 30 Aug 2010 , 6:05pm by newmansmom2004

Jynuine Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 7:24am
post #1 of 6

I am having the BIGGEST issue with pain in my back and inbetween my shoulders when I am making my cakes! I think it has something to do with bending over and attending to detailed work... does anyone have any suggestions for back pain-free working when it means long hours of molding, detailing, and rolling? Thanks!

5 replies
brincess_b Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 8:00am
post #2 of 6

more than likely your posture is bad. leaning over, hunching your shoulders, will give you pain. so make an effort every five minutes to reset your posture. (and try and make sure you have good posture day to day as well, so it becomes more second nature)

try and work at the right height as well. maybe rather than the current worksurface, theres another table you can use, or do you have an adjustable chair to put you at a better height?

and have a good stretch after wards too (and inbetween!), theres plenty of sites showing appropriate back, shoulder and arm stretches.

Caths_Cakes Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 10:12am
post #3 of 6

i have a bar stool in my kitchen which weve had for years, we no longer have the bar but for some reason, We kept the stools lol, its the perfect height for me for my bench, i find sitting much easier than standing icon_smile.gif

chellescountrycakes Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 6:05pm
post #4 of 6

I have the same problem. especially when rolling out fondant. I have to stand and lean over to do it. But I fiqure not much can be done- 4 epidurals, one of them was a little off-

Jynuine Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 5:46pm
post #5 of 6

Well, I think it might be a combo of both back issues and my posture. The only space I have is at my dining room table and I have to scrunch down for little details. standing hasn't made a difference either- but I HAVE birthed 6 kids in 11 years. That is definitely going to effect my back!

newmansmom2004 Posted 30 Aug 2010 , 6:05pm
post #6 of 6

Make a point to stop what you're doing every 30-45 minutes or so and take a quick break to stretch. Lie flat on your back on the floor and raise both legs straight up so they're perpendicular to the body. With both legs together, move your legs in small circles - 3 to 5 each direction. This is a great lower back massage. That's where I get the aching.

Also, do some exercises to stretch your shoulders and upper back. Take a soup can in each hand and stand straight up. Do some shoulder rolls. Also, hold your arms straight down with a soup can in each hand. Move your arms straight backwards slowly, then bring back down to your sides.

Just stopping for a 5 minute exercise session will help. If you have a comfortable chair or stool with a solid back, you might try sitting on that while you work as well. Make sure you have GOOD lighting so you don't have to lean forward to squint and see.

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