Some Last Minute Timeline Questions...

Decorating By AndreaRu Updated 13 Aug 2010 , 9:27pm by KJ62798

AndreaRu Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 4:39pm
post #1 of 13

Thanks for all the advice in my other thread about buttercream. I have that all sorted out and I'm ready to bake my cakes today. I realized that I have a small problem. The instructions said I needed one 10" cake pan, but I obviously should have bought two.

For the sake of time and ease, I'm modifying a cake mix using a recipe I found here in the recipe section. I read that 2 cake mixes will make one 10" cake (I assume 2 layers). So, since I want a taller cake, I need to make 3 mixes.

I'm assuming I can make a double mix and tort it, then make a single mix. If that's correct, how long should I let the first cake cool before I attempt to remove it from the pan to bake the second? I don't really have time to go get another cake pan.

The rest of my timeline is to make the buttercream when the cakes are almost cool. How many hours minimum should I let the cakes cool before I put on the crumb coat? Do I need to let the buttercream chill or rest?

Then after I crumb coat, should I just cover loosely and leave out on the counter until I'm ready to put the fondant on tomorrow? It's VERY hot and very humid here right now, if that matters.

The party is on Sunday, so I plan to do the fondant and decorate tomorrow (Saturday).

Thanks! icon_smile.gif

12 replies
CWR41 Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 5:07pm
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaRu

...how long should I let the first cake cool before I attempt to remove it from the pan to bake the second?




I'd wait at least 10 minutes, preferably no longer than 30 minutes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaRu

The rest of my timeline is to make the buttercream when the cakes are almost cool.




No need to wait, you can make it now or while the cakes are baking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaRu

How many hours minimum should I let the cakes cool before I put on the crumb coat?




Maybe an hour or two, but it's different for different sizes. If you'd like to speed up the cooling time, it wouldn't hurt to chill your cakes in the refrigerator for an hour or freezer 15 minutes or so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaRu

Do I need to let the buttercream chill or rest?


It doesn't need to chill (too hard to work with), and it doesn't hurt to let it rest if you're making it well in advance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaRu

Then after I crumb coat, should I just cover loosely and leave out on the counter until I'm ready to put the fondant on tomorrow?




Sounds good... although I wouldn't cover at all. Once the cake is iced, it won't dry out.

chellescountrycakes Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 5:21pm
post #3 of 13

Yes, once I crumb coat I just leave it there.

I usually dont 'tort' I layer. I put 2 mixes in a 10 inch- bake- take out, set on cooling rack, get my saran wrap ready, turn over onto another wrack, and cover, then back to the first rack to finish covering.

then I throw in the freezer- mix up two more mixes, throw in oven (at 315) and bake- Take out, saran wrap, throw in freezer. it keeps moisture in, and helps them cool quicker. you dont have to freeze all the way through, most times I do, cause I cook the day before at least.

When I take them out, I level if it needs it (and I didnt get it right before hand) and I stack them with BC between. usually its about 4 inches high. and I crumbcoat.

then if they are frozen, I will let them sit out and get room temp before I start putting on my fondant.

AndreaRu Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 5:39pm
post #4 of 13

Thanks, guys. This is making me feel more like I know what I'm doing. icon_smile.gif

I bought 4 mixes for the bottom layer just to be safe. Should I just make 2 double mixes and layer those? I was worried that if I didn't tort, I might not know for sure if the cake is completely done in the middle. Though I've baked dozens of cakes, they are usually from scratch and this modified mix is scaring me. icon_smile.gif

Since I'm only making one mix for the top tier, I didn't want the bottom to be so tall that the top tier looks ridiculous by comparison.

CWR41 Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 6:04pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaRu

Since I'm only making one mix for the top tier, I didn't want the bottom to be so tall that the top tier looks ridiculous by comparison.




I don't know what size diameter your top tier is, but it won't look ridiculous as long it's not taller than the lower tier. Layer cakes (or tiers) are typically 4" tall, so if you're going for a proportionate look, I'd recommend sticking with 4" height.

AndreaRu Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 7:50pm
post #6 of 13

The bottom is 10" square, but the top is just going to be a 2 layer 8" cake (that I'll cut down to 6").

If I use 4 mixes in the bottom tier and only one on the top, I'm just wondering if the tiny top tier will look silly. I think I'll just do it that way and if I need to, I can run out and get more cake to make another layer for the top.

The top tier is my dairy and egg-free cake for my son who is allergic to all the stuff in the cake for everyone else, so it only needs to serve one person.

Now I need to go cut some cake boards and make some buttercream. And find something to cut my wooden dowels, too. icon_smile.gif

AndreaRu Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 8:38pm
post #7 of 13

Uh oh. I ran into a snag. Maybe.

I made two mixes using the durable cake for 3d cakes recipe. But it's a LOT of batter. I am sure it was way more than would fit in my 10" pan. I filled it just a bit over 2/3 full and I think that may be too full, no? I've never used that much batter in one pan before. Am I in trouble?

I didn't use all the batter, so now some is sitting there waiting. Can I just save it and mix it with the next batch or will it sitting around for a while wreck it?

AndreaRu Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 8:52pm
post #8 of 13

Uh oh. Ok. My cake is now above the edge of my pan. Please tell me I can fix this.

KJ62798 Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 9:09pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaRu

Uh oh. Ok. My cake is now above the edge of my pan. Please tell me I can fix this.




As long as it is rising nicely and not spilling liquid, leave it alone & let it finish cooking. Any cooked "bump" above the level of the pan can be cut off to level the cake at exactly 2in. Use a long serrated knife and the edge of the pan as a guide to cut off the bump before you take the cake out of the pan.

HTH
Kristy

cakemama2010 Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 9:10pm
post #10 of 13

You can fix it. After you've let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes or so take a bread knife (or torting knife, or ANY long knife if you don't have either) and slice off the top before you take it out of the pan, using the pan as your guide for the knife to keep it level.

AndreaRu Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 9:13pm
post #11 of 13

Thank you!! It's not spilling liquid, but it's still nowhere near done after 40 minutes. When it comes out I'll level it before I take it out. icon_smile.gif

AndreaRu Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 9:14pm
post #12 of 13

Oh wait. Forgot to ask. I'm on my phone so it's hard to type. Can I use the leftover batter or should I toss it?

KJ62798 Posted 13 Aug 2010 , 9:27pm
post #13 of 13

I rarely can get all the pans I need to bake into the oven at one time. I fill the pans, bake the smallest/quickest first and then bake the next round. I haven't had problems w/batter waiting while the first set bakes. If is going to be a long wait I've chilled it but let it come back to room temp before baking so that it rises properly.

I always seem to have extra batter. There are alot of 4in cakes in my freezer.

Kristy

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