eggsnbakin Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 1:29am
post #1 of

I figured since you ladies are the owners of this type of business, you would be the ones to ask. icon_smile.gif

I live in the Springfield, MO area and I am currently looking for a decorator position, and they are hard to come by!

Right now, I'm not too concerned about the pay, I just want to do something I love. I'm currently in the insurance industry, and no amount of money is worth THAT headache!

I have called around and nobody is hiring, but I want to be able to give them something so that when a position does open up, they will think of me.

I have thought about making a 'call me' card with a link to my cake photos on it, and my contact information. That way, when I walk into a place, and they say they aren't hiring, I can leave them with that in the event a position opens up.

What do you think of that, and if someone came in to your shope and did that, would they be the first person you called in the event of an opening?

Any help is appreciated!

16 replies
JaeRodriguez Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 1:33am
post #2 of

see below *facepalm*

JaeRodriguez Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 1:34am
post #3 of

sorry! I have no clue how I posted on the wrong thread :[

mamawrobin Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 1:49am
post #4 of

You could go to some of the places that you're interested in working and take your portfolio with you. That way they can see the quality of work that you do and your skill level. Couldn't hurt to leave your card with them for future reference. If they aren't hiring right now they may call you later.

jillmakescakes Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 1:50am
post #5 of

My suggestion is to call to see if it would be Ok for you to drop off your resume in person for them to keep on file and to ensure that the time would be Ok (NO FRIDAYS!!!!!)

Also, you can ask if they would prefer a paper copy or an email copy. Make sure that you "like" them on facebook, if applicable. if you have a facebook page, make sure you update with cake photos often.

Bottom line is, many (but not all) bakeries are on a limited budget and rarely expand. They probably receive many employment inquiries (we typically get 5-6 a month). You might check with your grocery store bakery to see what positions they may offer you. Some grocery stores will allow more freedom if they are in less busy market.

please know that I'm not trying to pee in your cheerios, but as a shop owner, I can say that it can be hard to get into a custom shop. You will probably have more luck starting in a grocery and moving into a custom shop.

eggsnbakin Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 1:58am
post #6 of

I've worked in a custom shop before, for about 6 months before going into insurance.

So, I wouldn't really be going from no experience to a custom shop. I also taught Wilton classes for about two years.

It just so happens that all the Wilton class instructor positions around here are filled, too! Cake decorating is popular right now, so I'm not surprised. icon_smile.gif

jason_kraft Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 2:13am
post #7 of

Have you thought about starting your own business?

LindaF144a Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 2:47am
post #8 of

Definitely start a portfolio. As I found out just today - saying that you have taken a couple of Wilton classes and have piping skills means nothing without a portfolio.

Tomorrow I am going to get some insulation to make cake dummies and from now on I am making a cake once a week. I only hope that I can then pass the cake off to a friend or neighbor as we are getting caked out here.

jason_kraft Posted 11 Aug 2010 , 2:55am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindaF144

Definitely start a portfolio. As I found out just today - saying that you have taken a couple of Wilton classes and have piping skills means nothing without a portfolio.



Don't forget a digital portfolio as well, there are several sites such as flickr, picasa, and photobucket that will store your pictures.

Also invest in a good digital camera (I use a Canon SD780 IS) and read up on basic photography techniques. A portfolio is only as good as the quality of the pictures you take.

ButtercupMama Posted 14 Aug 2010 , 1:25am

Well, at my shop, we keep resumes on file, and look thru them when it's time to hire. I like to receive a one page resume, with one page of photos of your work attached for me to keep. (cakes/desserts you made using diverse mediums).
You can attach a cover letter if you like, but this sort of set- up is attractive to me, as a person who does the hiring.
But you'd be surprised how many crazy resumes I get, with typos, sentences that don't make sense, no punctuation... one totally screwed up one even had a bullet point about her "attention to detail". ( I could just see us hiring her and ending up in the next Cakewrecks book)

Anyway, this is your first impression! And then you could follow up with a quick call or e-mail. It's often a matter of timing, so you may need to be diligent about looking and checking in.

Bakeries may be looking for help not long before your area's busy season kicks up.

Best of luck; your work looks great! You shouldn't have trouble finding something, as long as the timing is right. icon_smile.gif

CaSandra77 Posted 24 Sep 2010 , 11:13pm

Do you have to have a culinary degree to get a job or even open up ur own business? Or can we take tons of classes and be able to get a job? Thanks for help CaSandra

kareninflorida Posted 27 Sep 2010 , 12:08am

What a great question! I've applied at all of the local chains (grocery stores, Walmart, Target, Sams, etc.) for bakery dept. positions, but since I have zero professional baking/decorating experience (my background is in banking, not baking - another HUGE headache! icon_rolleyes.gif ), I know exactly where my online applications are going (begins with "D", ends with "E", and rhymes with "ELITE"! icon_lol.gif )

I had an idea a few weeks ago, but haven't gotten up the nerve to try it yet. (Plus, I'm "unofficially" working on an upcoming event, so I haven't had the time.) Basically, I thought I would take my measley portfolio of the few things I've done, along with resume & references, and offer myself on a volunteer basis to any of the local small bakeries who would take me for as many or as few hours a week as they wanted, just so I could get some experience to add to my resume. No task is beneath me; I'll clean, haul supplies, do whatever is needed.

I'd really love to hear from the pros on this: if someone walked into your shop with such a proposition, would you take them up on it or would you think they were crazy? LOL I'm on unemployment, plus I work part-time on the weekends, so I'm doing "okay" right now financially. As eggsnbakin said, it's not about the money; it's about doing something I love. (LOVE your handle, btw! icon_biggrin.gif )

DavidDJr Posted 27 Sep 2010 , 12:32am

Bake them a really nice small cake or some cupcakes and show them what you can really do as far as decorating. Also include information about you and your skills and maybe a link to a website, gallery, or online portfolio.

kareninflorida Posted 27 Sep 2010 , 12:45am

Yeah, how about a business card cookie? You could present them with your "business card" - a decorated cookie - along with 1-page resume & pics. That would surely be different & get you noticed, right? I might have to try that approach when searching for volunteer/intern options. icon_wink.gif

jason_kraft Posted 27 Sep 2010 , 1:13am
Quote:
Originally Posted by kareninflorida

Basically, I thought I would take my measley portfolio of the few things I've done, along with resume & references, and offer myself on a volunteer basis to any of the local small bakeries who would take me for as many or as few hours a week as they wanted, just so I could get some experience to add to my resume.



This is actually done quite often...some culinary schools even require their students to complete a certain amount of externship hours (often unpaid) before they graduate.

wespam Posted 27 Sep 2010 , 11:59am

I have a very small custom shop. Most of the applicants that come in and ask about employment have no experience and want to wash my dishes rather than decorate. I tell them that's what my husband is for. Ha! While it would be nice to find someone who has some experience with icing and decorating to help on a part time basis, having the passion and a teachable spirit is probably more important to me. Pam

Evoir Posted 27 Sep 2010 , 12:32pm

I would find it hard to have someone on board as a regular employee, but sometimes I would love to have a decorator with some experience be willing to come in to do some basic decorating tasks in our busiest times, on an as-needed basis. This, unfortunately, doesn't suit someone who wants to enter the profession as a career. But I have a number of middle-aged ladies whose details I have on hand, that I can ask to come in for one or two days work here and there.

My business is not big enough to be offering a training type position unfortunately!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%