Question About Not Crumbcoating...???

Decorating By Mikel79 Updated 7 Aug 2010 , 7:07pm by sugarshack

Mikel79 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 7:52pm
post #1 of 23

Hi Cakers!

I havent crumb coated a cake in over 1 year. I am thinking out loud here and was hoping for some input.

I live in Metro Atlanta. The weather here is ridiculous! It is so hot. Temperature running about 95 and the heat index anywhere from 105-115. The humidty is out of control as well. I keep my house air at 74 degrees, but the inside temp. in the house gets up to 79 or 80 about 5:00-6:00.

In the cooler months, after unwrapping my cakes from food safe plastic bags, I let the bare cake (No crumb coat) exposed to the room air for about 2 hours. I have found that this is about how long it takes for my cakes to dry up all that condensations. I use the WASC from this site.

This method helps me with cake air bubbles that form sometimes after icing a cake.

Now, here in the summer, do you think that a bare cake exposed for about 2 hours with inside temp. about 80 degrees will be ok?

When I normally do this in the cooler months, there is no problem with freshness? Very moist. I am just worried about those dang air bubbles that form when I do not allow my cake to come to room temperature. I also wonder about the cake drying out in 80 degree AC house temp.

I appreciate the help, sorry for the long post.

Michael

22 replies
sweettreat101 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 8:13pm
post #2 of 23

The outside of your cake will dry out a little. I usually just leave mine wrapped sitting on the counter for two hours before decorating.

Mikel79 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 8:19pm
post #3 of 23

When I leave my cakes wrapped there is condensation that forms on the cake, this is why I have to leave it out to dry...


Thanks,

Michael

Mikel79 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 10:57am
post #4 of 23

Any other input from others? icon_biggrin.gif

poohsmomma Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 11:47am
post #5 of 23

How about covering it loosely with waxed paper. Not as airtight a covering as plastic wrap, but might keep it from drying out too badly.

Mikel79 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:31pm
post #6 of 23

Thank you for the wax paper tip. I might give that a try...

Thanks

Michael

campayven Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:42pm
post #7 of 23

why dont you buy a dehumidifier to help take the moisture out of the air in your house. We live in Japan - very humid here - almost mostly above 90% humidity. We have 2 dehumidifiers in my house and it makes a world of a difference in moisture in the air.

kansaslaura Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:48pm
post #8 of 23

There is nothing like a taste to know. Bake a small layer and go through the steps you normally would and cut yourself a slice. That's what I'd do, complete reassurance that way.

Mikel79 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 1:48pm
post #9 of 23

dehumidifiers...Good idea!

I might have to do a test cake and see.

Cooler months there is not problem with my cake being left bare in the room for 2 hours. I wonder if 4 or 5 degrees warmer really would make that much of a difference??


Thanks
Michael

Texas_Rose Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 1:53pm
post #10 of 23

Just test it...when it comes to humidity issues, what works for one person will not work for others sometimes, so only you can figure out what you need to do.

I used a dehumidifier in my apartment when I didn't have a decent AC. The dehumidifer puts out hot air, costs about $200 at Home Depot, and has a two gallon tank that has to be emptied twice a day. So it's not an ideal solution. It does make the air in the house more comfortable but it makes you more uncomfortable when you have to go outside icon_biggrin.gif

campayven Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 2:04pm
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Just test it...when it comes to humidity issues, what works for one person will not work for others sometimes, so only you can figure out what you need to do.

I used a dehumidifier in my apartment when I didn't have a decent AC. The dehumidifer puts out hot air, costs about $200 at Home Depot, and has a two gallon tank that has to be emptied twice a day. So it's not an ideal solution. It does make the air in the house more comfortable but it makes you more uncomfortable when you have to go outside icon_biggrin.gif



We just bought another dehumidifer. Only cost us about 160 and it holds about 3 gallons. Only needs to be emptied out once a day. Ours does not blow hot air. It is very quiet also.

SugarKissesCakery Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 2:17pm
post #12 of 23

I always have my frozen cakes wrapped first in plastic wrap, then a food safe bag. That way, when I set them out to come to room temperature, the condensation forms on the layer of plastic wrap and doesn't make the outer layer of the cake sticky. I also don't have to worry about the cake drying out that way.

deMuralist Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 2:39pm
post #13 of 23

we went through 4 dehumidifiers in our basement, they just burned up (they were oversized for the space so they were not overworked-they just couldn't take it when our winter came), in the end we just opened the a/c up to it and it worked like a dream. Also the dehumidifiers we used all had a hose we could put into a sink or drain to keep from having to dump water.

But I would think a dehumidifier would be the last thing you want if you are worried about the cake drying out.

Maybe if you put the layer in a cake saver or large tupperware type container? I often use a large deep one and turn it upside down, placing the cakes on the lid of the container and using the container itself as a lid.

sugarshack Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 4:57pm
post #14 of 23

i dont think the temp difference is going to have much impact. I let mine dry out for a good bit also before I ice to prevent blow outs

Mikel79 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 5:02pm
post #15 of 23

Hi Sharon!

I know in your BC DVD you mention about 30-45 minutes would be a good time to let the cakes air dry. For some reason, that is not long enough for me. It is about the 2 hour mark when my cakes are not sticky with the condensation.

Maybe it is the GA weather and Humidty that is different from LA?? Don't know, same goes with your BC recipe. I had to add more liquid so it would work.

Do you think 2 hours is to much?

Thanks,
Michael

sugarshack Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 5:05pm
post #16 of 23

test it like others said. make one, let it sit out, ice it and then eat it. have freinds tell you if it dry. It does not take mine 2 hours, i have an a/c in here i set at 68-70 so it is cooler and dryer in here than rest of the house.

SugarKissesCakery Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 5:50pm
post #17 of 23

I also have to add more liquid to Sharon's buttercream recipe . . . about 4 tbs. more at least. I just figured we are less humid up here in Ohio so the recipe needed more liquid. And I just have to say . . . Sharon's DVDs are amazing, worth every penny!

Mikel79 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 6:09pm
post #18 of 23

I agree! Sharon is Amazing! Her DVD's and me bugging the he** out of her have helped me out so much.

I to have to change up her BC recipe. I have to add a total of 20 TBLS. of liquid to her recipe, instead of the 16 called for.

My cakes for some reason stay wet after I unwrap them from the food safe bags. They stay sticky and cold for about 1-2 hours, not the 30-45 minutes it takes her cakes to be dried.

Go figure??...

Thank you,

Michael

sugarshack Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 6:38pm
post #19 of 23

why are they cold michael?

Mikel79 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 6:47pm
post #20 of 23

Sharon,

I keep the cakes wrapped in the bags you show on the BC DVD. I wrap the cake and leave it on my Dining Room table overnight. When I unwrap the cake and go to touch it first thing it is cool to the touch. Maybe cold was not the correct word to use. In addition to it being quite cool, it is also wet with condensation.

After the 30-45 minute mark, it is still sticky to the touch. I am afraid to ice it with it sticky cause I am scared of my icing bubbling. Since I started leaving my cakes out for about 1-2 hours, I have not had this problem.

But, with it being so hot outside, and the humidy I am afraid that this might be to long now.....

I use the WASC in your booklet.....

=)

sugarshack Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 6:56pm
post #21 of 23

ok, when u said cold that threw me off.

a slight stickiness to the touch is ok, that is just the sugar in the cake. but you do not want it to feel damp or wet in any way.

Mikel79 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 7:01pm
post #22 of 23

OMG! Are you serious!! I cannot believe this. I have been leaving all my cakes out to dry for 2 hours until that slight stickiness dryed up icon_surprised.gif

Ok, I have a cake to do next week. I am going to wait the 30-45 minutes, and then ice it. I will make sure it is not wet to the touch or damp.

Geesh.....I am over working this cake thing!

Thanks Sharon!!! You are the best!

Michael

sugarshack Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 7:07pm
post #23 of 23

sugar sticky =ok

condensation sticky/wet = not ok

experiment!

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