How Do I Stack Larger Cake Layers Without Them Breaking ?

Decorating By sweetnessx3 Updated 8 Aug 2010 , 10:08am by allaboutcakeuk

sweetnessx3 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 4:22pm
post #1 of 31

Hello icon_smile.gif

Is there an easier way to stack larger cake layers ? I place the bottom layer on the board and ice the top then go to pick up the next layer and im usually stuck at this point looking at it ....wondering how to pick the thing up and place it onto the other without breaking it ! Ive even tried putting it on a circle and flipping it onto the bottom layer but ususally miss , not lined up, or break it grrrr....... This is my larger cakes from 12" and up ! They just have to be an easier way .....hopeful icon_smile.gif))

30 replies
BeanCountingBaker Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 4:27pm
post #2 of 31

I put it on a board then slide it off like the directions on Wilton character pans recommend.

CWR41 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 4:30pm
post #3 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetnessx3

Ive even tried putting it on a circle and flipping it onto the bottom layer but ususally miss , not lined up, or break it grrrr.......




How about sliding it off of your circle instead of flipping it? You could also handle them easier if they were slightly frozen or chilled.

keriskreations Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 4:34pm
post #4 of 31

I wouldn't say that I'm an expert at this by any means, but I typically have good luck. I use a really long spatula and a metal flat cooking spatula and balance it on the two. I've never dropped them, and it is a bit precarious, but I've always had pretty decent luck - just a little smoothing to do on the icing when I get done. I'd be interested to see what others have to say though, I'm sure there's a better way than what I'm doing too!!

sweetnessx3 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 4:48pm
post #5 of 31

I will definitly try this icon_smile.gif But, does it not stick to your board Then not wont to slide ....

velcrostiletto Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 4:57pm
post #6 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by keriskreations

I wouldn't say that I'm an expert at this by any means, but I typically have good luck. I use a really long spatula and a metal flat cooking spatula and balance it on the two. I've never dropped them, and it is a bit precarious, but I've always had pretty decent luck - just a little smoothing to do on the icing when I get done. I'd be interested to see what others have to say though, I'm sure there's a better way than what I'm doing too!!




This is exactly what I do, lol! Works for me too, but agree there's gotta be a better way icon_smile.gif

Kimmers971 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 5:07pm
post #7 of 31

I use the Wilton Cake Lifter - actually depending on the size of the cake I use 2. I line up one end then gently slide (or help push) it off the lifter - always come out even. http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=F5E44F60-423B-522D-F605DA5FD1C1079F&fid=F5E44F6F-423B-522D-FDD110DDBA295A4A

sillywabbitz Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 5:09pm
post #8 of 31

I cut them in 1/2 . Why fight it. Once iced and cut no one will knowicon_smile.gif

Price Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 5:10pm
post #9 of 31

I use either a cake round or sometimes my flat cookie sheet depending on the size of the cake. For the larger cakes it does help to have the layer well chilled, and sometimes I sprinkle powdered sugar on my board before putting the layer on it.

Jaimelt76 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 5:21pm
post #10 of 31

I just had the same problem with a 14" round. I had no idea how I was going to stack it. My daughter walks in the kitchen and says "Why don't you cut it in half". It worked great and once frosted you don't even know.

dcallar Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 5:23pm
post #11 of 31

I also us the Wilton cake lifters but still difficult. I love the response of cutting the cake....I am thinking to myself....wow.....genius....and DUH...thanks so much for that one. Now I can breath again. thumbs_up.gif

Carmelo Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 5:23pm
post #12 of 31

chill/freeze the cake.
use a cake lifter that has been dusted with 50/50 corn starch and confectioners sugar.
works well.
hope that helps icon_smile.gif

CWR41 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 5:39pm
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetnessx3

I will definitly try this icon_smile.gif But, does it not stick to your board Then not wont to slide ....




No. When you flipped it, did it stick to your board? The bottom of the cake is greasy, it won't stick. If you have your cake upside down with the sticky top on the board, it will stick. Also, if it was in the freezer, it might slightly stick, but just run your spatula between the two to make sure it isn't stuck first, then slide it right off or shake/jiggle the board if you'd like.

sweetnessx3 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 6:20pm
post #14 of 31

GEEEEZZZZ Ifeel like a dumbie lol! Yes I had my cake upside down on my cake circle thats why it stuck lol! Sometimes I amaze myself hehehe! I actually did think about cutting it in half ,just was afraid too .......... Powder sugar and Cornstarch sound perfect icon_smile.gif

You CCers are GREAT! Thank you!

sweetnessx3 Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 6:23pm
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimmers971

I use the Wilton Cake Lifter - actually depending on the size of the cake I use 2. I line up one end then gently slide (or help push) it off the lifter - always come out even. http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=F5E44F60-423B-522D-F605DA5FD1C1079F&fid=F5E44F6F-423B-522D-FDD110DDBA295A4A




OHHHH SO THATS WHAT THAT THINGS FOR LOL! Thank you icon_smile.gif for sharing !!!

allaboutcakeuk Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 6:49pm
post #16 of 31

These are great ideas - here's a query i have though about putting cakes back together that are quite big .. i'm doing a cake with vanilla bc and jam. I've split the cake in two through the centre and lifted the top off with cake slider and board on top so I can flip it over as its big and want it to be level with the bottom one when i put it back on. I've put bc on the left one that's stuck to the board. put jam on the one on the right that needs to go back on top... now when I get to this bit i'm always like how do i flip it on top of the bc half without it breaking or getting messy. if i use my hands - covered in jam. If i use a cake slider its stuck to it and I still have to flip it back on without breaking. I've tried the jam on the left layer and then bc straight on top but it all ends up a mush and lifting jam off with bc - any help or am i just missing something simple?

keriskreations Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 8:56pm
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetnessx3

I will definitly try this icon_smile.gif But, does it not stick to your board Then not wont to slide ....




Well, I put all my cakes on a cake board - so, there's always a board between each layer - I guess I thought everyone did that.

allaboutcakeuk Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 9:20pm
post #18 of 31

ah i see no i mean like when doing a victoria sandwich style cake that is going to be covered in fondant so it is about 3" deep with the filling through just the centre

KayMc Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 11:11pm
post #19 of 31

I have two cake lifters: the Wilton one, and the one that is even better - Fat Daddio's. Fat Daddio's has a handle, which I like much better.

erichazann Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 11:24pm
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41


The bottom of the cake is greasy, it won't stick. If you have your cake upside down with the sticky top on the board, it will stick. Also, if it was in the freezer, it might slightly stick, but just run your spatula between the two to make sure it isn't stuck first, then slide it right off or shake/jiggle the board if you'd like.




I always ice my cakes this way -- upside down. That way, the top of the cake is perfectly formed and I pick up little to no crumbs from the top.. (I know, crumb coat, but if this is also super easy!)

I use a norpro cake lifter that is 10" round with a handle (better than Wilton lifter I think) -- can get it on Amazon and a Fox Run (I think) cookie spatula, which is like 6" or so round with a handle. Both work great to lift and the layers slide right off.

erichazann Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 11:30pm
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by allaboutcakeuk

bc - any help or am i just missing something simple?




I would not try what you are doing.. you need to keep the fillings on the stationary layer and then put the dry layer on top.

Why not put BC down first on the left, let it crust and then pipe or spread the jam on top. Or, pipe both BC and jam in a spiral pattern on the left, use one to fill in the void left by the other.. that way both flavors are in every bite, but they are not on top of each other.

erichazann Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 11:31pm
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by keriskreations

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetnessx3

I will definitly try this icon_smile.gif But, does it not stick to your board Then not wont to slide ....



Well, I put all my cakes on a cake board - so, there's always a board between each layer - I guess I thought everyone did that.




I think she is talking about layers and not tiers. You are talking about tiers right?

mookamoo Posted 6 Aug 2010 , 11:55pm
post #23 of 31

That's so funny that this is on here... I got in this situation today...i cracked a 12 inch cake taking it out of the pan last night and one side stuck and it cracked almost all the way down the middle. I baked a new one today because I was afraid it would not hold the other layers weight without collapsing in half under the fondant. I thought that I read sometimes that if you put too many dowel rods it could make the cake collapse too. Could cutting the cake on purpose make this same this happen? I have no clue.

mysweetsugar75 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:21am
post #24 of 31

I always thought that you leave the cardboard cake board under each tier - that would be resting on the dowels to keep the the whole 2/3/4/5 tiers level and keep the cake from above each layer from smashing the lower tiers. I'm new to this and have only watched you tube videos on stacking. Would this be a correct method or am I wrong? Newbie here would like to know the most stable way of stacking.

erichazann Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:25am
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysweetsugar75

I always thought that you leave the cardboard cake board under each tier - that would be resting on the dowels to keep the the whole 2/3/4/5 tiers level and keep the cake from above each layer from smashing the lower tiers. I'm new to this and have only watched you tube videos on stacking. Would this be a correct method or am I wrong? Newbie here would like to know the most stable way of stacking.




Yes, you are right. but I thought the OP was talking about the layers of a cake, not the tiers.

mysweetsugar75 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:33am
post #26 of 31

erichazann - you are right she is referring to layers (I had to re read the op)
thanks

sweetnessx3 Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 2:07am
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by erichazann

Quote:
Originally Posted by mysweetsugar75

I always thought that you leave the cardboard cake board under each tier - that would be resting on the dowels to keep the the whole 2/3/4/5 tiers level and keep the cake from above each layer from smashing the lower tiers. I'm new to this and have only watched you tube videos on stacking. Would this be a correct method or am I wrong? Newbie here would like to know the most stable way of stacking.



Yes, you are right. but I thought the OP was talking about the layers of a cake, not the tiers.




Yes , I was asking about the layers not tiers lol! someone else ask about left and right ???? Im confused lol! I got my answer though icon_smile.gif I will look on amazon about getting me a cake lifter THANK YOU icon_smile.gif

allaboutcakeuk Posted 7 Aug 2010 , 12:08pm
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by erichazann

Quote:
Originally Posted by allaboutcakeuk

bc - any help or am i just missing something simple?



I would not try what you are doing.. you need to keep the fillings on the stationary layer and then put the dry layer on top.

Why not put BC down first on the left, let it crust and then pipe or spread the jam on top. Or, pipe both BC and jam in a spiral pattern on the left, use one to fill in the void left by the other.. that way both flavors are in every bite, but they are not on top of each other.




This is a great idea thank you - its impossible otherwise or it just breaks into bits. Normally if I do bigger than 10" I do bake the layers separately and sandwich together and always ice the bottom of the cake so it is the top and smooth.

erichazann Posted 8 Aug 2010 , 4:29am
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetnessx3

someone else ask about left and right ???? Im confused lol!




The person who asked about left and right is trying to put two fillings in between two layers. She literally means "sandwich" icon_smile.gif Think about how you make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.. but it is impossible to flip over the right-hand side layer if it is too large w/o it breaking.

I had to read it several times to understand.

I just had another idea tho.. if you were dead set on flipping the right side over, couldn't you secure it (lightly) with buttercream to a cake board so that when you flipped it over it would not fall off right away. You could position it properly.. then hold the side down while you lifted the board off. It would only lift off neatly tho if the top was a finished edge, i.e. the bottom of the cake.

bmarlow001 Posted 8 Aug 2010 , 4:50am
post #30 of 31

I freeze it then when somewhat thawed I slide it off my board using the wilton cake lifter.. it works out great especially when it comes to it being even with the cake below it.

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