Push Down Method For Leveling

Decorating By mindy1204 Updated 4 Aug 2010 , 5:44pm by CWR41

mindy1204 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 1:27pm
post #1 of 19

I was reading on here last night while I had 2 cakes in the oven and I read about this method.

I have to say it was awesome. I just used a cake board the size of the pan and it worked perfect. No more leveling with the wilton cake leveler for me. And it saves on wasted cakes. thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

Hubby isnt happy he doesnt get the scraps anymore icon_smile.gif

Is there any other option to push them down with instead of wasting my cake boards?

18 replies
Babs1964 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 1:46pm
post #2 of 19

A cookie sheet thumbs_up.gif

BosCakes Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 1:50pm
post #3 of 19

i just use a sheet of wax or parchment paper and press down with an oven-mitted hand..i still double check with the leveler to make sure it's all uniform...so nice to not have so many scraps (i really don't need more cake scraps...)

idocakes4fun Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 1:52pm
post #4 of 19

I use a lint-free towel and just lay it across the cake and start pressing all around.

leily Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 2:01pm
post #5 of 19

I lay a piece of parchment paper over the cake, then either a cutting board or my cooling rack (dependson the size) then put one of my glass bowls on top to help hold it down. Leave it there for about 2-3 minutes then take it all off.

mindy1204 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 2:14pm
post #6 of 19

Thanks.. The cookie sheet wouldn't work while they are still in their pans I need something to go down into the pan. I will try the parchment paper idea next time. I did check them and they were perfect!

CWR41 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 2:26pm
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mindy1204

Is there any other option to push them down with instead of wasting my cake boards?




It certainly doesn't ruin the cake board, so why don't you use that same board to flip your cake onto? You'll need it for support to use in the freezer or under the cake anyway for easier handling when icing and transfering to your baseboard or stacking onto another tier.

mindy1204 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 2:31pm
post #8 of 19

My cakes do not rise above the edge of the pan so to get it in so I can smush it well I do have to bend the edges of board since it is a little bigger than the pan. I guess I could bend them back out and re-use them since the icing/fondant would cover them!

kansaslaura Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 2:51pm
post #9 of 19

I just grab a clean towel and gently push--don't you love the texture and moistness??

debbief Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 2:55pm
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mindy1204

My cakes do not rise above the edge of the pan so to get it in so I can smush it well I do have to bend the edges of board since it is a little bigger than the pan. I guess I could bend them back out and re-use them since the icing/fondant would cover them!




I just use a smaller cardboard cake circle with a tea-towel between the cake and circle. So for a 10" cake, use an 8" or 9" cake circle. I use the towel in between so the cake does not stick to the board.

TobysCakes Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 3:10pm
post #11 of 19

Does this not make your cake not as fluffy?

CWR41 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 3:20pm
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mindy1204

My cakes do not rise above the edge of the pan so to get it in so I can smush it well I do have to bend the edges of board since it is a little bigger than the pan. I guess I could bend them back out and re-use them since the icing/fondant would cover them!




Rather than bend the edges of the board by forcing it into the pan (which makes it harder to get the board out), why not use the next size smaller cake circle?

I prefer using the smaller size to allow the cake edges to come up higher than the center temporarily since it's going to spring back down somewhat anyway. (or the center actually pops back up a bit!)

CWR41 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 3:27pm
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by debbief

So for a 10" cake, use an 8" or 9" cake circle.




Me too... thanks for mentioning this. I didn't mean to post a similar answer after you did--just got tied up on the phone before hitting the send button!

CWR41 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 3:32pm
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobysCakes

Does this not make your cake not as fluffy?




Surprisingly, it does not change the texture of the cake (as long as it's not underbaked to begin with!)

frogcooke Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 4:45pm
post #15 of 19

You do this when its right out of the oven? Or does it cool first? I might have to try this.

mindy1204 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 4:57pm
post #16 of 19

Yeah I did have to fight a little to get the board out of the pan. I will try the next size down next time.

I did it about a minute or two after is cake out and it worked so well.

millermom Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 5:14pm
post #17 of 19

You don't want to wait too long after you take it out, or the sticky top part will make a mess.

foodguy Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 5:27pm
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by leily

I lay a piece of parchment paper over the cake, then either a cutting board or my cooling rack (dependson the size) then put one of my glass bowls on top to help hold it down. Leave it there for about 2-3 minutes then take it all off.




This is the exact method that I use and it works beautifully for me.

CWR41 Posted 4 Aug 2010 , 5:44pm
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by frogcooke

You do this when its right out of the oven? Or does it cool first? I might have to try this.




Yes... immediately after removing from the oven. Press it down, remove your circle, let it cool, dump it out, flip back over to bottom.

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