Little Ball Shaped Cakes - How?

Decorating By gp2010 Updated 9 Aug 2010 , 6:48am by Skirt

gp2010 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 10:08pm
post #1 of 27

I have seen a lot of examples of wedding cakes which are a cake at the top and then lots of small ball cakes underneath. Anyone know how these are made and more importantly, how on earth they are iced with the fondant!!??

26 replies
Elcee Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 10:14pm
post #2 of 27

Do you have a picture as an example? The only thing I can visualize from your description are the ball separators that Wilton makes and those are not cake.

tesso Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 10:46pm
post #4 of 27

now those are cool !!

metria Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 10:49pm
post #5 of 27

cake ball w/ poured fondant?

Tracy7953 Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 10:50pm
post #6 of 27

I have the ball pans from Wilton-they would probably do the trick. I have made larger balls for different cakes but I love these smaller ones. They are so pretty. Would be cute Christmas ornaments.

Elcee Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 10:58pm
post #7 of 27

malakainrop, those are very cool...way out of my skill level, though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracy7953

I have the ball pans from Wilton-they would probably do the trick. I have made larger balls for different cakes but I love these smaller ones. They are so pretty. Would be cute Christmas ornaments.




Tracy, have you been able to get a true round ball from that pan? I use mine a lot but just use the half rounds. It seems like no matter how much tweaking I do, the 2 halves never come together to form a perfect sphere. Or am I just too nit picky? icon_lol.gif

Tracy7953 Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 11:10pm
post #8 of 27

Elcee,
Here is one example of a ball I did. It is buttercream so the small ones should probably be covered in fondant so you can handle them. Maybe if you worked with the half spheres chilled it would be easier to match up. I really don't know for sure - just guessin!

Apti Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 11:10pm
post #9 of 27

DANG! Those are super cool round cakelets! I thought you were talking about the Wilton round ball cake supports until I went to the link you provided. I've seen lots of photos of the Wilton ball supports wrapped in all sorts of things, but I've never seen round cakes like these. I'll be watching this thread to see if anyone knows how to do perfectly round cakelets.

I'm with Elcee, unless I get really detailed instructions, I think these are out of my skill level for sure.

Tracy7953 Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 11:12pm
post #10 of 27

If anyone else knows the details on how to make them, I'd love to know too.

allaboutcakeuk Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 11:34pm
post #11 of 27

I agree on the Wilton mini ball pan. Possibly they are part frozen to enable them to be handled easily to cover with fondant. It is possible to get a pretty smooth finish with balls but so so so tricky!!! I often use another piece of fondant as a smoother for tricky things that a larger smoother won't work with. They are gorgeous though has certainly got me thinking ....

SugarFrosted Posted 31 Jul 2010 , 12:23am
post #12 of 27

Are you perhaps talking about this Wilton ball pillar set? They are often used as a base to make many different things, spiders, animals, etc, as shown in the ideas pictures at the bottom of that page.
http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=01BC340D-802D-F658-0CD45CAA252EAB95&fid=01BC342C-802D-F658-04F75CC3D5E68FDD

ladyanaely Posted 31 Jul 2010 , 12:44am
post #13 of 27

Maybe they used something like the Wilton mini ball cake pan. icon_wink.gif

cutthecake Posted 31 Jul 2010 , 12:52am
post #14 of 27

Cake balls dipped in chocolate?

Apti Posted 31 Jul 2010 , 4:16am
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by malakainrop

http://www.makiscakes.com/wedding-cakes/temari




If you visit the link above that was provided, I don't think there's any way to make those gorgeous round creations with cake balls. I tried a CC search with "round", "sphere", "ball shaped" and got nothing even close to Maki's signature round cakes.

I sent an email to Maki, she's located in London, asking if she might share with Americans at CC how she does her round cakes. Who knows if I'll get a reply, her wedding cakes are booked a year in advance and her party cakes at least 3-4 months in advance. I'd love to be able to do perfectly round, smooth cakes like hers; sigh.......

Apti Posted 31 Jul 2010 , 3:16pm
post #17 of 27
Quote:




ibmoser, you are wonderful! I saw your "first try" photo on the thread you provided and it came it great. I'm sure I can do this now that I've read all the information and saw how your first one came out. I'm finding that my "first" of everything I do is very unsatisfactory to me, but everyone in my family thinks it's amazing. It takes me two or three times (or way more....) before I start to get the hang of new techniques.

I think I'll begin with the larger Wilton mini ball pans, then when I get those down, order the smaller round sizes from the store you mentioned in your link.

Thank you AGAIN! Have an wonderful day!

Apti Posted 2 Aug 2010 , 4:43pm
post #18 of 27

This is the reply I received from Maki (see the link from OP) following an email to compliment her on her signature round Temari cakes and ask if she would be able to share her how-to:

Thank you very much for your compliments.

I am pleased to hear you like my cake designs.
Due to a high demand, I have decided to take this opportunity to publish my first book. The book is due to published in Spring 2011 by Squires Kitchen Group.
http://www.squires-shop.com/ibf/index.php?p=home&loc=GB

The book includes my signature Temari cake and some other popular items. I hope you enjoy my book and making the Temari cake!

Kind Regards,
Maki
www.makiscakes.com

ibmoser Posted 2 Aug 2010 , 4:57pm
post #19 of 27

So I have less than a year to come up with more space on my bookshelves icon_lol.gif I will definitely have to have that one......

Apti Posted 2 Aug 2010 , 5:16pm
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibmoser

So I have less than a year to come up with more space on my bookshelves icon_lol.gif I will definitely have to have that one......




Look at it this way, we have less than a year to try these little goodies and see if we don't need to buy her book!

Apti Posted 8 Aug 2010 , 6:26pm
post #21 of 27

Guess what?! I was checking out a CC member's cakes and she does perfect little round ball cakes using the Wilton Mini-Ball pan and has a series of 4 pictures with a description of how she did it. YIPPEE! Her Christmas ornament cakes are gorgeous. Here's the link:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1523981

I am going to PM her and tell her about this forum.

I ran down to Michael's, coupon in hand, but the bums didn't have the mini-ball cake pan. It's the first time I've left Michael's without buying something from the cake aisles.
I'm attending ICES in a few days, so I'll stifle my urge for instant gratification and see if the Wilton booth has any mini-ball pans for sale on site.

CreativeCakeFactory Posted 8 Aug 2010 , 8:18pm
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

Guess what?! I was checking out a CC member's cakes and she does perfect little round ball cakes using the Wilton Mini-Ball pan and has a series of 4 pictures with a description of how she did it. YIPPEE! Her Christmas ornament cakes are gorgeous. Here's the link:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1523981

I am going to PM her and tell her about this forum.

I ran down to Michael's, coupon in hand, but the bums didn't have the mini-ball cake pan. It's the first time I've left Michael's without buying something from the cake aisles.
I'm attending ICES in a few days, so I'll stifle my urge for instant gratification and see if the Wilton booth has any mini-ball pans for sale on site.


Hi All! I made the Christmas ornament cakes. Heres the instructions

I used the Wilton mini ball pan and put two of the cakes together to make the ball. (I never found this pan in the store; had to order it online.) I put filling in the middle of the two cakes halves. Then I crumb coated them with buttercream and made sure they were perfectly round balls with the buttercream. I put them in the fridge overnight to set. The next day I put alittle more buttercream around them (make sure this is perfectly smooth) and covered each in colored fondant. Cover them quickly and move the fondant around the base to get it perfect. I used my hands and the fondant smoother to keep them perfectly round. I put them back in the fridge for about an hour. Then I took them out of the fridge and let the sweat dry off and decorated them with luster dust and cut out decorations. Hope this helps!

Dayti Posted 8 Aug 2010 , 11:05pm
post #23 of 27

Thanks for posting your instructions! I have a potentially dumb question though. If your finished ball is around 3.5" in diameter, how big did you roll out your fondant, and did you roll it into a circle? icon_redface.gif I'm just wondering how to deal with creases at the base of the sphere...or do they not matter cos you can't see them much?

casme Posted 9 Aug 2010 , 4:04am
post #24 of 27

Beautiful, I am going to have to try these.

Skirt Posted 9 Aug 2010 , 4:27am
post #25 of 27

I just got my mini ball pan. 4 months left to practice making Christmas ornaments...

Not for nothing but did you see the price for those balls? icon_eek.gif The small ones start at £10 (that's $16.00!!!) icon_eek.gif

Charmed Posted 9 Aug 2010 , 4:41am
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by CreativeCakeFactory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apti

Guess what?! I was checking out a CC member's cakes and she does perfect little round ball cakes using the Wilton Mini-Ball pan and has a series of 4 pictures with a description of how she did it. YIPPEE! Her Christmas ornament cakes are gorgeous. Here's the link:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1523981

I am going to PM her and tell her about this forum.

I ran down to Michael's, coupon in hand, but the bums didn't have the mini-ball cake pan. It's the first time I've left Michael's without buying something from the cake aisles.
I'm attending ICES in a few days, so I'll stifle my urge for instant gratification and see if the Wilton booth has any mini-ball pans for sale on site.

Hi All! I made the Christmas ornament cakes. Heres the instructions

I used the Wilton mini ball pan and put two of the cakes together to make the ball. (I never found this pan in the store; had to order it online.) I put filling in the middle of the two cakes halves. Then I crumb coated them with buttercream and made sure they were perfectly round balls with the buttercream. I put them in the fridge overnight to set. The next day I put alittle more buttercream around them (make sure this is perfectly smooth) and covered each in colored fondant. Cover them quickly and move the fondant around the base to get it perfect. I used my hands and the fondant smoother to keep them perfectly round. I put them back in the fridge for about an hour. Then I took them out of the fridge and let the sweat dry off and decorated them with luster dust and cut out decorations. Hope this helps!




Is there a trick to crumb coat these little balls? you know because of their shape ...how do you hold them without disturbing the buttercream and how to smooth the fondant without having many pleats.

Skirt Posted 9 Aug 2010 , 6:48am
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by charmed



Is there a trick to crumb coat these little balls?




I've seen on different cake shows that they use a flexible piece of plastic to smooth the buttercream. That way, the plastic curves itself around the contour of the sphere. The strip of plastic seems hard but soft enough to bend. It's a straight piece, no curve in it already, that gets bent.

I saw it recently on Fabulous cakes (the Earth cake on top of 3/4 other tiers). Oh, and also on Amazing Wedding Cakes where one shop did a basketball themed groom's cake.
HTH!

I think I watch too much cake tv..... icon_redface.gif

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