dm321 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 6:42pm
post #1 of 13

Between all my books and all the different websites online - I'm getting some contradictory info, or at least some very confusing info...

The sad thing is - it's not that hard. I'm just second guessing myself now after looking at so many different conversion charts.

Anyone have a firm answer?

thanks in advance!
~diem

12 replies
Cakepro Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 6:45pm
post #2 of 13

After you find out, you really should go buy a kitchen scale. Items like flour and powdered sugar are best measured out by weight, not by volume.

cheatize Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 6:56pm
post #3 of 13

Do you have a digital scale to weigh yourself? If so, step on the scale holding an empty cup. Now fill the cup to what you think is close and weigh yourself holding the cup again.

dm321 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 7:02pm
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

After you find out, you really should go buy a kitchen scale. Items like flour and powdered sugar are best measured out by weight, not by volume.




Yes, I need to get one... Thanks for the tip!

~diem

dm321 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 7:04pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

Do you have a digital scale to weigh yourself? If so, step on the scale holding an empty cup. Now fill the cup to what you think is close and weigh yourself holding the cup again.




I'm afraid I weigh icon_wink.gif way too many cups to get an accurate measurement like that! icon_lol.gif he he!

~diem

Caths_Cakes Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 7:17pm
post #6 of 13

Definatley weigh your ingredients, Much more accurate than using cups.

donnella2045 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 7:21pm
post #7 of 13

4 oz of flour, both ap and cake flour, equal one cup (according to King Arthur Flour). All ingredients should be weighed for accuracy because the size of cups do vary.

dm321 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 9:53pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by donnella2045

4 oz of flour, both ap and cake flour, equal one cup (according to King Arthur Flour). All ingredients should be weighed for accuracy because the size of cups do vary.




Thanks! to Donella & King Arthur! thumbs_up.gif

~diem

dm321 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 10:00pm
post #9 of 13

Thanks, bakers icon_smile.gif ! I appreciate the help & the tips!

I do plan to get a scale. And once I have it, I'll know how much a cup of flour should weigh! icon_wink.gif

Thanks again!
~diem

sweet_honesty Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 10:06pm
post #10 of 13

I usually use this site as a guide. It isn't gospel but it's pretty accurate I find. I cross reference with other cookbooks as well to get an average,

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking#subs

dm321 Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 10:10pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_honesty

I usually use this site as a guide. It isn't gospel but it's pretty accurate I find. I cross reference with other cookbooks as well to get an average,

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking#subs




Oh - Love that you can pick your substance with this one. Thank you!

~diem

LindaF144a Posted 29 Jul 2010 , 11:03pm
post #12 of 13

I use 4.5 for AP flour and 4.1 for cake flour. If the cake flour is sifted first, then it is 3.5 oz.

All these weights are taken from several different books, but the ones I remember off the top of my head are Bakewise, who has a completely listing in the back of the book, and The Cake Bible.

I figure as long as I am consistent it will work out. Besides I weigh my ingredients. I don't like it when a recipe just puts down volume and not weight, so I convert everything I bake.

anxietyattack Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 1:17am
post #13 of 13

According to Google (which I live by lol) 12 US fluid ounces = 1.5 US cups

If you type in the conversion you want google will pull up a conversion calculator. I do however agree with the previous posts and I would try and get a good kitchen scale. I love mine. It really helps me to convert tons of recipes.

good luck icon_smile.gif

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